Boyce Ditto Public Library - Browse

ABOUT BROWSE FEED

The [Old] City Hall

Description: This picture shows the old Mineral Wells City Hall at 202 N. Oak Avenue. Police, who were on foot, were summoned to the police station by a red light in the dome of the Baker Hotel before the two-way radio came into use. The City Hall was later located at 215 [Weaver's book, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", on page 152, says 211] S.W. 1st Avenue with Fire and Police station at 215 [the book says 212] S. Oak--east of the City Hall.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

Old Elmhurst Park , Allen & Charles,1907

Description: Two people are shown standing on the wooden bridge at Elmhust Park, Mineral Wells, in 1907. A holograph inscription on the photograph that reads "Old Elmhurst Park, Allen & Charles, 1907", probably refers to the man and boy in the picture. Elmhurst Park, a very popular recreation area during its heyday, was located in southwest Mineral Wells at the end of the streetcar line. Patrons walked from the streetcar (in the background) across the wooden bridge to the Casino and other attractions.
Date: 1907
Item Type: Photograph

[An Old Home in Mineral Wells]

Description: An old home, located in Mineral Wells, Texas, on 404 SW 3rd Street is shown here. The Baker Hotel faintly visible in the background, looking about half-way up the lowermost branch of the tree in front of the house, and looking towards the northeast.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[An Old Map of Mineral Wells]

Description: An early cadastral map of Mineral Wells with the original street names, it also shows the unusual topography of the surrounding mountains. The streets were paved in 1914, and the street names were changed January 1,1920.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Map

[The Old Matt Skeen Home - 516 NE 4th Avenue]

Description: This is a picture of old Matt Skeen Home at 516 NE 4th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. The porch, the face of the gable, and the differing roof lines all suggest later remodeling. Note the unusual candle-snuffer roof of the unusually-placed tower. The picture was taken June of 1974.
Date: June 1974
Item Type: Photograph

[The Old Post Office]

Description: This picture shows what is now [2101] known as "The Old Post Office Building." A horse, dragging a cart, is seen drinking out of a trough in front of it. The trough is now [2010] located in the Mineral Wells Commons park. The whereabouts of horse is unknown. The building now [2010] houses the Women's club. The picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 188.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

On the Broadway of America Highway, Mineral Wells, Texas

Description: The title on the Picture states, "On The Broadway Of America Highway, Mineral Wells, Texas." This picture shows a section of the Bankhead Highway, looking east where the main road to Millsap descends from the mountain on which the Mineral Wells Airport stands. Once identified as part of US Highway 281 south of town [Mineral Wells], it overlooks much of the scenery viewed from "Observation Point",at one time called one of the most scenic vistas in the state. The Bankhead Highway was America's first transcontinental highway, starting at Mile Zero on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D. C. It terminated in San Diego, California, and was named for Senator John Hollis Bankhead, head of the Good Roads Movement. It was once labeled "The Broadway of America." The road was approved by Congress in 1916, but construction was delayed by World War I. Hundreds of miles were built in the 1920's when it crossed Palo Pinto County. Mineral Wells' main streets, Hubbard Street and SE 6th Avenue were part of the Bankhead Highway. Hollis Bankhead was the grandfather of Broadway Actress, Tallulah Bankhead. His brother ran a Drugstore in Gordon, Texas, with the proud motto: "The best is none too good for our customers." The drugstore also advertised, "Everything from the cradle to the grave", selling products ranging from baby food to coffins.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

One of the Residence Streets

Description: Pictured here is a promotional brochure. The main part of the picture is a view looking west on Moore Street (now NE 6th Street). At the left (south) side of the street, in the middle distance, is the Hexagon House Hotel that was built by David G. Galbraith, inventor of the paper clip. The hotel opened in 1897. To the immediate left is the Gibson Well and Drinking Pavilion. At the far corner of the Gibson property, in the middle of the street, appears to be the public drinking fountain shown in a companion picture--AWO_1076P--which is also included in the Weaver Collection. The fountain was apparently removed from the intersection when the "Dinky cars" began operating to Lake Pinto in 1905. The poor quality of the image is due to print screening.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

The Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells

Description: A.F. Weaver obtained this cartoon from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters", now in the Palo Pinto County Album collection (q.v.). The booklet is written in the nineteenth-century burlesque tradition, and is not meant to be taken seriously. See also the cartoons "The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877" and "Mr. Lynch on His Way to Discover Mineral Wells."
Date: unknown
Item Type: Artwork

[The Opening of the New Brick Highway - 1936]

Description: A new, brick-topped highway was opened between Mineral Wells and Weatherford in 1936. In the opening ceremony, J. Pat Corrigan is identified cutting the symbolic ribbon held by Allan Wallace and W.A. Ross. The new brick highway began at [NE?] 9th Avenue, and extended along East Hubbard Street. Brick paving the 21-mile stretch of road was laid entirely by hand by two black men whose names, however, were never preserved for posterity.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

Our City

Description: A photograph, taken from Welcome Mountain looking West down NW 4th Street, of unknown date is illustrated here. The small brick building in 4th Street is the Crazy Well. The first Crazy Water Hotel (left middle of picture) was built on same location as present Crazy Water hotel. The present hotel is much larger and extends to the Crazy Well. Note the Crazy Flats (drinking pavilion with apartments) in foreground. Note the first Catholic Church, on West Mountain. The West Ward School and the High School are in upper left quadrant of picture.
Date: 1912?/1915
Item Type: Photograph

The Oxford Hotel

Description: The Hubbard Street Trolley car is shown at Oak and Hubbard Streets on its way west to Pinto Lake, next to the Oxford Hotel. The First State Bank and Trust was located in the northwest (near) corner of the hotel.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

Oxford Hotel, Mineral Wells, Tex[as]

Description: Shown here is a photograph titled "Oxford Hotel, Mineral Wells, Tex." It shows the completed building of the Oxford Hotel, and First State Bank and Trust Company, located at Oak and Hubbard. Note the period automobile. Written under the picture is: "I was just getting along alright [sic] write and let me know [lacuna?] you all are getting along. Will go to Wichita Falls next wk" [Signature illegible]
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

Pal-Pinto-Crystal Wells Bath House

Description: The Pal-Pinto Crystal Wells Bath House is illustrated here, although its location is unknown. Thelma Doss wrote in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" that, "It was a long, rambling structure with a large number of rooms for bathing purposes for both ladies and gentleman. There was a grand selection of baths such as Plain, Turkish, Salt Glow, Russian Massage, and Vapor baths. This large rambling structure looked more like a house for a large family than a business." This picture occurs on page 65 of A. F. Weaver's book in both First and Second Editions.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph