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The John Moore Home, 1911, 2 of 2: Interior
An inscription on photograph reads: "(John Moore Home) 1911." The original builder was Hugh Coleman. John Moore occupied the house at a later date. Please note the period dress and furniture. The names of the people pictured are not known. This photograph appears to show a house now located at 915 NW 4th Avenue.
John Moore Home, 1911 [exterior]
An inscription on photograph reads: "(John Moore Home) 1911." The house was built in 1906 at 915 NW 4th Avenue by Hugh Coleman. Note the period dress and cowboy clothing. The names of the people pictured are not known. The young man in the foreground is demonstrating his skill with a lariat. The group appears to be in the home's porte-cochere, which was used to protect people, while disembarking from an automobile or a carriage during inclement weather
[A Joint Meeting of Kiwanis and Rotary Clubs]
This photograph is found in A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells...", first edition, on page 101. The caption reads, "Inside the Damron Hotel at a joint meeting of Kiwanis and Rotary Clubs. Dr. McCracken is third from the right." Dr. Joseph Hill McCracken was President of the Texas Medical Association in 1911. The Damron Hotel, in the 100 block between West Hubbard and Southwest1st Street, burned in 1975.
[Judy Garland in Mineral Wells]
This picture, found on page 161 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, identifies the man selling a money order to Judy Garland in the Old Post Office (on NE 2nd Street) as D. C. Harris. The man on the right is identified as W. A. Ross. It has since [2102] been determined that the reason for Miss Garland's presence in the post Office was to lead a procession of children there in order to purchase Defense Stamps.
A July Crowd
This photograph,labeled "A July Crowd", shows a ladies' gathering about 1920. The photograph shows what is possibly a tea party or a ladies' club meeting. Some of the ladies shown were members of prominent Mineral Wells families. Identified in a typed note - and graph - accompanying the photograph are: (starting at back left) the 4th lady is Mrs. D. G. Galbraith [wife of the owner of the Hexagon House], the 8th is Mrs. E. F. Yeager [wife of Dr. E.F. Yeager, Pharmacist/ Owner of the Lion Drug Store), 16th is Mrs. J.H. McCracken [wife Dr. J.H. McCracken, president of the Texas Medical Association], 17th may be Mrs. Raines (Mrs. McCracken's mother); (middle row, starting in front of Mrs. Yeager) the second from left is Mrs. Dr. Beeler; (first row from left) the 3rd lady may be Mrs. Coon, the 6th lady is Mrs. Paul Bock, the 8th is Mrs. Reba Williams. The children in front are Langdon Bock on the left and Elizabeth Galbraith on the right. There were forty people in total.
Junior Class, 1913
A photograph of the Junior Class of 1913 is illustrated here. Please observe that two of the men in the front row are wearing soft collars, which was just becoming fashion at the time. The only person identified is Miss David Gladys Galbraith (named after her father, owner of the Hexagon Hotel) in the middle row, 3rd from the right. Identifications of the other people would be welcomed. The Junior class of 1913 would have been the last graduating class from the East Ward School in 1914. Mineral Wells' High School opened that following year, 1915.
[The Kidwell Heights Elementary School]
Kidwell Heights School was built in 1910 at 1508 SE 6th Avenue as an elementary school for grades one to four. It was used for various purposes after being closed as an elementary school--including the administrative offices for Mineral Wells' fledgling Silk Industry before and during the early part of World War II (when the supply of silk for parachute material was embargoed). The development of nylon as a substitute, however, was accelerated. The cheaper and more versatile artificial material doomed the native silk industry, and the offices were closed in 1942. Kidwell Heights was used as a Junior High School for about three years, 1951 to 1954, after which time, the Junior High moved to the (then) new Mineral Wells third High School building at 900 SW 5th Avenue. The inset in the picture is the south entrance of Mineral Wells' second High School at 101 NW 5th Avenue. The building currently [2010] houses the Knights of the Pythias Hall.
The Kingsley
The Kingsley was built on the side of East Mountain around NW 7th Street, and was eventually destroyed by fire. The legend reads "The Kingsley, Mineral Wells Texas." This photograph appears on page 102 of A. F. Weaver's pictorial history book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells..." Second Edition, 1988.
Kitchens & Mess Halls, Camp Wolters
A legend on the bottom of the photograph clearly reads: Left: Top, Entrance to Camp Wolters. Bottom, Kitchens and Mess Halls, Camp Wolters." It shows seven rock-faced buildings with a curb in front of them. Ash cans, and trash repositories--also rock-faced--are visible on left. Five men--unidentified--stand around. The date of the photograph has not been preserved, but Camp Wolters was the World War I and World War II predecessor of what was changed to Fort Wolters during the Vietnam Era.
[The Knights of Pythias Band]
This photograph appears on page 187 of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." (Second edition, 1988, by A. F. Weaver) with the caption, "Knight of Pythias 212 Band of Mineral Wells". The photograph is labeled "K of P Band -- Guy Woodward, Director, Mineral Wells, Texas." The Knights of Pythias Lodge is now located at 610 SE 14th Street in Mineral Wells, adjacent to the former Kidwell Heights elementary school. The Knights of Pythias has run an orphans' home in Weatherford, Texas since the turn of the twentieth century. Mr. Weaver had been in possession of a Pythian album, from which this picture may have been abstracted.
KORC 1140 On Your Dial
A picture of a KORC-KBS Microphone--"1140 on your dial" is shown here. Mineral Wells' radio history dates back to the 1930's when Mr. Hal Collins, owner of the Crazy Hotel, began sponsoring broadcasts originating in the hotel lobby. The radio station was founded and owned by Mr. Achilles Corcanges, and aired its first broadcast on December 5, 1946. Radio station KMWT-FM began broadcasting from Mineral Wells in 1970. The broadcasts were aired nationwide, at noon daily, over the Texas Quality Network. It advertised Crazy Water Crystals. Both stations' call letters were changed in 1983 to KJAS-AM and KYXS-FM. Many show business luminaries appeared on the shows. For instance, Mary Martin of Weatherford began her singing/acting career here.
A Label of Mineral Water
Shown here is a fairly modern label from a bottle of (concentrated) mineral water. Unlike its earlier representations, it makes no promise of curing disease. Instead, the label gives instructions on how to dilute the water, when to take it--and a warning when not to imbibe.
[A Ladies' Athletic Team]
Nine ladies in uniform (?), with kerchiefs on their heads, are shown seated on a rug in front of what is presumed to be a painted background. The basketball in front of the center-most lady is marked "'14". They are, perhaps a ladies' basketball team. Further information concerning them is lacking.
[The Ladies Civic League Fountain]
The Ladies Civic League Fountain, shown in this photograph, is now [2009] located in the "Towne Common" (behind the Mineral Wells Office Supply), surrounded by "Memorial Bricks." It was originally located at the corner of SE 2nd Street and SE 1st Avenue as a watering trough for horses. It was moved in 1911 to the back part of the Gibson Well Park in the 700 block NW 2nd Avenue. (It may have been moved to facilitate the flow of the expected traffic around "the old Post Office", construction of which started in May the following year, 1912.) The fountain was relocated in October of 1972 (the time of the photograph) to West City Park on W. Hubbard Street (Highway 180 W), and placed at its present location in 2007.
[Ladies Holding Flowers]
This photograph presents a mystery. Ten ladies, dressed in 1920's-style fashion, stand on the steps of the Baker Hotel, holding bouquets of chrysanthemums; one lady has roses; a basket of flowers with a tulle ribbon stands in foreground. The occasion for this display is entirely unknown. A legend on back reads: "For Q from L Mrs Joe Young." The identities of the people mentioned are entirely unknown.
[Ladies With Parasols]
"Sllew La Renim" (a social club) was "Mineral Wells" spelled backwards. Its members pose in front of the Old Post Office in 1913. Identified in the photograph are: Anna Mae Guinn, Ernestine Pollard, May Belle Smith, Ann Locke Galbraith, Ruby Andrews, Mattie Withers. Note the Mineral Wells Sanitarium in the left background. This photograph may be found on page 118 of "TIME WAS...", First Edition by A.F. Weaver.
[Lake Mineral Wells, 1 of 4, Flood Stage]
Lake Mineral Wells, Mineral Wells State Park, is shown here in flood stage. Heavy spring rains dumped 7.2 inches of rainfall into the area over a violent week-end in March 1976, resulting in a flood that claimed 24 lives in fire- and water-related incidents. The dam is visible on the far left side of the picture, with water flowing over it. Flood waters cover a large part of the land between the photographer and the dam. The public boat ramp and fueling station are on the peninsula at the far right side of the picture. The picture is part of a group of films labeled "1977", but related news articles give the date as March of the previous year.
[Lake Mineral Wells, 2 of 4]
The dam of Lake Mineral Wells is shown here during a flood, March 1976. A large area of Palo Pinto and Parker counties received heavy rains (up to 7.2 inches in places) during a three-day period. The road directly below the dam was entirely under water, and the effect of water flowing over the road is barely visible. Heavy damage was also reported over a substantial part of the City of Mineral Wells as a result of the downpour.
[Lake Mineral Wells, 3 of 4: Sign]
A sign in front of the spillway (which was part of the dam for Mineral Wells Lake before it was rebuilt to a higher level during World War Two) says, "Water For Texans."
[Lake Mineral Wells, 4 of 4: The Spillway]
Shown here is the lower end of the spillway from Lake Mineral Wells after the flood in March 1976. The dam is barely visible at the upper end of the spillway in the middle of the picture. The road directly below the dam is under water, and is not visible in any other pictures of this flood. It suffered such severe damage that it had to be rebuilt.
[Lake Pinto]
Many property owners in early Mineral Wells had their own water wells, but the city pumped water to a small standpipe on East Mountain for distribution to the city. When the wells became insufficient to supply the city's needs, Barber Lake 9it was later named "Lake Pinto) was built in the Barber Addition--in the northeast part of town--as Mineral Wells' first city water supply lake. Around 1905, Cicero Smith and Ed Dismuke built a dam across Pollard Creek west of the city to form Lake Pinto, the city's next water supply. Barber Lake, the City's first municipal water supply, can still be found southeast of Cullen Grimes School (built in 1920 at 1800 Northeast 1st. Avenue as Barber School, the name was changed to Cullen Grimes School in honor of a long-time principal when it was enlarged in 1942.)
[A LakeWood Park Scenic Railway, Dinky Car "Esther"]
This photograph shows the "Dinkey Car", Esther, that operated on The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway to Lake Pinto from 1905 to 1907, at which time the lines were removed. The background indicates the picture was taken near Lake Pinto. This "Dinky Car" was one of two named "Esther" and "Susie" after local banker Cicero Smith's daughters. Banker Smith and Ed Dismuke, owner of The Famous Water Company, built the Scenic Railway. These little cars, powered by gasoline engines, ran every 15 minutes from Mineral Wells, around West Mountain, to Lake Pinto. A larger version, called the "Ben Hur", was added in 1907. Round trip cost 15 cents, and the cars ran on their own steel rails from 1905 to 1909. The Scenic Railway operation to Lake Pinto differed significantly from the trolley and tracks of the Mineral Wells Electric System. The trolley company served the City and ran some two miles southwest to Elmhurst Park and Lake between 1906 and 1907.
The Lamar Bath House
The Lamar Bath House was part of a complex of buildings, the last of which was next door to the current First Methodist Church on NE 1st Street. In this picture, the first, or old, First Methodist Church, which was across NE 1st Street, north of the Lamar, can be seen at the far left. An engraving in the "Cutter's Guide to Mineral Wells" (originally published in 1893, re-printed in 2007) showed a wooden structure with a polygonal tower, from whose apex a flag flew. This photograph, therefore, must be of a newer building. The original Lamar Bath House, however, was sophisticated. It featured "[H]ot, cold, vapor, douche [shower] and Turkish electro-therapeutic (both faradic [sic] and galvanic [sic]) baths", and cooling rooms (segregated by sex) for its customers. Page 59 of A.F. Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells" defines the Lamar property as consisting of several buildings in the same vicinity. The current Baker Hotel, at the corner of Hubbard and NE 1st Street, replaced all the Lamar buildings along with a couple of other businesses.
[The Lamar Bath House, Lamar Annex]
This picture is the Annex to the Lamar Bath House, and was located south of the first Methodist Church. The first bath house in Mineral Wells (at Dubellett's French Well) was located northeast of the Methodist Church, and was a neighbor to the Lamar property. The White Sulphur Well, operated by a Mr. Ligon, was located across the street--south of the Methodist Church--and sold in 1891. The Lamar Well and Bath House was developed at this time, and served water under the White Sulfur label. The Lamar property became part of the Baker Hotel property when the hotel was built and opened in 1929.
Laying the Cornerstone of the Post Office
Shown here is the laying the cornerstone of the Post Office at 201 NE 2nd Street on May 13, 1912. The Chautauqua is at the upper left corner of the picture, and the Cliff House Hotel is visible in the upper middle of the picture. Buildings on the right side of the picture were situated on the east side of Mesquite Street (now NE 1st Avenue). Buildings on the far right of the picture were once located where the Baker Hotel now [2008] stands. Early automobiles and horse-drawn carriages also appear in the picture. The photographer appears to have been standing on the north side of NE 2nd Street, looking east. A holograph inscription above and below the picture cannot be read.
Legarian Club
This photograph shows Members of the Legarian Club, a Mineral Wells Ladies' social club around the turn of the twentieth century. Members included (from top to bottom): Anna Hustead, Hitt Hiles, Anna Oliver Munns, Gussie Waldron Coe, Annie Farley, Maggie Arnold Johnson, Bessie Birdwall Yeager, Alice Raines Williams, Willie McQueary Martin, Anne Yeager Crawford, Fay Henry, Alice Richards Hiles, Kitty Austin Simms, Ada Yeager, [Unidentified], and Ada Crump. The picture appears to have been taken at an outing at Lovers' Retreat, (a public recreation park at the time) on Eagle Creek, about 4 miles west of Palo Pinto.
[Leon Cross, Shoe Shine Boy in 1975]
Leon Cross was the only "shine boy" left in Mineral Wells in 1975. He worked in the first Crazy Hotel just before it burned; and has been with the Crazy Hotel ever since, working in different departments of the Hotel. He is the Shine Boy today [2003] in the Crazy Barber Shop, located in the Crazy Hotel. This photograph appears in A.F. Weaver's book "Time Was in Mineral Wells."
[A Letter from Texas Governor to D.C. Harris]
James V. Allred, then governor of Texas wrote, on July 14, 1938, to D.C. Harris a charming response to a letter Mr. Harris had sent to him. The original letter, that prompted this reply, has not survived to this day [2010]. Mr.Allred's letter is reproduced here for the benefit of the curious.
[The Lezine Home]
This picture illustrates the John and Gracie Lezine home, located at the corner of S. Oak Avenue and SW 7th Street. The Lezines had three boys,that survived: Oscar, O[die]. D., and Olen; and two girls: Evelyn and Dora Le , all of whom were reputed to have worked hard. A John H. Lezine was born in 1904, but died in 1905. The Lezines were quite prominent in the community. John Lezine, himself, was born in 1881; he died in 1945. Gracie (Richardson) Lezine was born in 1883, and she died in 1944. This photograph appears on page 183 of A.F. Weaver's "Time Was...", Second Edition.
[The Lezine House
A large house is shown here. The original photograph is not in good condition. A black man (in shirtsleeves) may be seen on the first floor, next to a seated black lady. Two black men, more formally dressed, stand on the second floor. The building was owned by John Lezine, who began as a cook, and ended up owner. The hotel (and later private building) was operated as a hotel for black people. The presumed street in the front does not appear to be paved.
[A Lion's Club Christmas Project]
A note by A.F. Weaver identifies this group as "Left to right: Lions, Cary Lodal, Moon Mullins, Charlie Johnson, "Santa Claus", Jess Pervine, Noble Glenn." The last four are pictured as sitting on the running board of a General Motors truck, which appears to be loaded with wrapped gifts. (No connection is known or implied, but since the "Santa Claus" in the picture is not identified, an interesting bit of local history is offered by way of suppletion: Rancher Charley Belding, a bachelor living west of Palo Pinto, was known annually to contribute (anonymously) truckloads of Christmas Gifts for needy children in the county.) Note the Hexagon Hotel in the upper right corner and the two gasoline stations, Gulf and Sinclair (H.C.) The picture appears to have been taken on the east side of N. Oak Avenue in about the 500 block. The Lion's club, mentioned in the title, is a service organization.
[The Lion's Club Womanless Wedding]
The Lion's Club presented an annual comedy skit known as a "Womanless Wedding." This one took place about 1940, and appears on page 119 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells," First edition, 1974, by A. F. Weaver. He identifies the men as, "Standing in back: G. Ritchie, Weaver, B. Joiner, B. Holmes, ?, N. Glenn, J. McGaha. Middle row: F. Brewer, ?, H. Cohen, ?. Front row seated: G. Johnson, ?, L. Gambrell, ?, C. Lodal, N. Carlock, ?, M. Mullins."
[The Lion's Club Womanless Wedding]
Lion's Club Womanless Wedding [Around the 1930's or '40's] A note tacked to the bottom of the picture reads: LEFT TO RIGHT: LIONS Conrad Brady Clyde Murray Alton Pope George Ritchie Al Frances Burl Lawrence Charles Garland One "lady" [Conrad Brady] wears the banner "Miss Conduct"; another, [Alton Pope]the banner "Miss Judge."
[The Lions Club Womanless Wedding]
Pictured here is the Lion's Club "Woman-less Wedding", a Community Entertainment Production sponsored by the local Lion's Club as a fund-raiser for local charity, and popular around the 1930's and 1940's. Participants are identified as: Seated; J. B. Courtney (Miss Fortune), Charles Williams and Noble Glenn (Miss Applied). Standing; Cary Lodal, Dr. Holder, Bob Joiner, Jess Purvine, Cecil Young, Charlie Johnson and Frank Burney (Mae West).
Lithia Well
The Lithia Well drinking pavilion was located on the southwest corner of the Crazy block at 400 NW 1st Avenue. The roof of the second Crazy Well drinking pavilion can be seen to the left of the Lithia. The Mineral Wells Library maintained its second location in this pavilion. The First Crazy Hotel was built on this location in 1914, but burned in 1925. The rebuilt and expanded Crazy Hotel (Now [2008] a retirement home) replaced the burned hostelry in 1927. See also the following picture.
Lithia Wells
The Lithia Wells and Drinking Pavilion was located on the southwest corner of the "Crazy Block." (400 NW 1st Avenue, the current [2008]location of the Crazy Retirement Home). The second Crazy Well Pavilion is the large building the upper left of the photograph. Note the three burros next to the horse. Riding burros up a trail on East Mountain was a popular tourist pastime, in addition to drinking and bathing in the mineral waters. The Mineral Wells Public Library was located in the Lithia Pavilion at one time. See also the preceding picture.
Living Room in Home Econmics.
This picture shows the living room in the Lillian Peek Home Economics Building at Mineral Wells' High School. The Peek cottage was built by the W.P.A. in 1937, and was the first free-standing Home Economics classroom/laboratory in the State of Texas. It is now the property of the Fifty Year Club, and is leased to the Creative Arts Center Studio/Workshop of the Mineral Wells Art Club. Note the construction of the false fireplace with its fire brick lining, which was typical of stucco home construction in the 1930's and 1940's.
[Looking North on Oak Avenue]
A photograph, looking north on Oak Street between 1914 and 1916. Work has started on paving the street. This picture is to be found on page 16 of the second edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells..."
Looking South on Mesquite Street
A street scene, identified as Mesquite Street (now NE 1st Avenue)and looking south, taken at the turn of the twentieth century, shows businesses that antedate the coming of the automobile. On the right, in the middle of the picture, the Yeager Building is shown with a stone lion mounted on its roof. Many historians now refer to this building as the Lion Drug Store. However, current Yeager descendants now living in Mineral Wells do not remember the store as ever being named anything but The Yeager Drug Store. The third building on the left (with the spire on top) was the Star Well whose manager, Frank Richards was an active participant in Mineral Wells' early business and social activities. At the end of the street is Mineral Wells depot built in 1902. Absence of the "Dinky Car" tracks in the middle of the street indicates that the picture was taken prior to the building of the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway in 1905.
[Looking South on Mesquite Street]
A photograph that looks south on Mesquite Street (in 2008: NE 1st Avenue)is shown here. It was taken after 1914, as the pavement indicates. Several automobiles and a horse-drawn buggy share the street. Note the water fountain between cars in right-center foreground. This water fountain was later moved to Mineral Wells' West City Park, and is now in the "Towne Common", located in the 100 block of SW 1st Avenue. The picture may be found on page 79 of A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS . . . " Mini Edition, 2004.
[The Lookout Tower of the Casino at Elmhurst Park]
This photograph appears on page 87 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. He writes, "The Casino had two lookout towers. Note the five persons in the tower." The people are not identified. The photograph appears to have been retouched for sharpness and contrast.
[A Love Story of Mineral Wells]
This photograph appears to be a fragment of the cover of an advertising booklet that includes the fiction "A Love Story of Mineral Wells", by Mamie Wynn Cox. Her fiction was first published in 1911. Four libraries worldwide claim possession of a copy of it. The complete booklet is available by flipping through the page by selecting "next" above the photographs. The cover shows a lady holding a handful of dominoes, which was probably meant to establish a connection to Mineral Wells, Dominoes once being a popular pastime in the city. The game of 42 (named after the number of points that could be scored in a game) was invented in Garner, seven miles east of Mineral Wells. For readers interested in obtaining a copy of the fiction, the Dewey Number of it is 833; the Library of Congress Call Number is PS 3505.O97
[Lovers Retreat]
Lovers' Retreat has been called one of the most scenic spots in Texas. This popular picnic spot, located on Eagle Creek north of US Highway 180 (four miles west of Palo Pinto, and south of the creek) was used for many years for camp meetings, and the annual Palo Pinto Old Settlers Reunion. This photograph shows some of the huge boulders in the area north of Eagle Creek, which were accessible from the picnic area by a suspension foot-bridge that spanned a popular swimming and fishing hole. This spectacular recreation area is currently [2007] on private property, and no longer accessible to the public.
Lower End of Mesquite Street
A view of Mesquite Street (in 2008: NE 1st Avenue), taken in 1910, and looking south-east. The scene shows horse-drawn wagons loaded with cotton bales. Electrical lines are visible. The building at the northeast corner of East Hubbard Street and South Mesquite Street is the D.M. Howard Block. D. M Howard was the first of five Howard brothers to come to Mineral Wells and establish businesses. There was a Dry Goods store on the left end of the building, a millinery shop above it, and a grocery store was in the building to the right. Later the J.M. Belcher Furniture occupied the building; and still later, R&W Furniture. Demolition of the building began March 17 of 1975 to make room for the Savings and Loan Building and a parking lot. The First State Bank now [2007] occupies this entire block.
[The Lynch Cabins]
A drawing of the Lynch cabins, done by Jarmon Alvis Lynch, grandson of James Alvis Lynch. The drawing says "Alvis Lynch 77" in the bottom right-hand corner. The picture was apparently done from memory. The original mineral water discovery well is in the right foreground, with a windlass for drawing water. "Judge" Lynch and his family did not arrive in Millsap Valley until Christmas 1879. Note the tents in the right background. H. M. Berry, Mineral Wells' first teacher, noted in an article that when the reputation for the curative powers of the water spread, the area looked like "an army on the move" with health-seekers temporarily camping in tents until housing could be built for them.
[Lynch Plaza , 1 of 3]
This photograph of Lynch Plaza and The First State Bank (now Home Health in 2008) was taken from the 100 block of South Oak Street. The Gentleman's Closet is next to the bank (The store is vacant as of 2008). The Baker Hotel can be seen above Lynch Plaza, at the corner of E. Hubbard and S. Oak Streets.
[Lynch Plaza, 2 of 3, Different View]
No Description Available.
[Lynch Plaza 3 of 3]
Lynch Plaza, in the center of this picture, is located on the corner of North Oak and East Hubbard Streets. This structure, originally called the Firstron Building, replaced the First National Bank at this location. The bank was located in the northwest corner of the Oxford Hotel. The hotel building, including the bank, was destroyed by fire in 1983.
[Lynch Plaza and Martin Building, Parking Lot ]
A parking lot for Lynch Plaza and the Martin Building is located at the corner of West Hubbard Street and SE 1st Avenue. The Berry and Associates Building is visible in the background.
D. M. Howard Merchant
A view of the D.M. Howard store is shown here. It was located at 101 SE First Avenue. D.M. Howard was one of five brothers to come to Mineral Wells from North Carolina. D.M. Howard died on January 23 (a Saturday), 1910 at his home, following an operation for appendicitis. This building was occupied by J. M. Belcher (a furniture dealer)for many years after it had ceased to be the D.M. Howard store, and then by the R.& W Furniture store. It was eventually torn down in 1975 to make room for the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan--and for parking. This picture is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 122.