Boyce Ditto Public Library - 1,381 Matching Results

Search Results

Mineral Wells Index (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 31, No. 258, Ed. 1 Sunday, March 1, 1931
Daily newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising.
Mineral Wells Index (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 31, No. 268, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 12, 1931
Daily newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising.
Mineral Wells Index (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 31, No. 286, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 2, 1931
Daily newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising.
Mineral Wells is 100% for "Ike" Sablosky
Two boys,wearing flat paper caps,are shown here holding a sign that proclaims that Mineral Wells is "100% for 'Ike' Sablosky." The occasion is presumably a sports event--as suggested by the background. Details concerning Sablosky may be found in other pictures in this collection--under his name.
[The Mineral Wells Mounted Police]
A copy of a newspaper clipping, the caption identifies members of the Mineral Wells Mounted Police "57 years ago." Identified are: "Uncle Billy Wood" on his white horse (not a member of the force); Bob Pate; Paul Craig; Jim Barrett, probably Chief of Police at the time; Paul Granbury. All are reported to be deceased at time of printing. The picture was furnished to the paper courtesy Mrs. Paul Granbury. The sign on the building at the far left of the picture has been tentatively identified as a Livery Stable. Though the sign is visible, the distance has made its contents extremely obscure. The first city hall was located at the corner of First Avenue and Third Street, with a fence to hold impounded livestock. The rounding up of stray livestock was the primary duty of the mounted police in 1910. Two more more individuals were also forbidden to fight in public; no-one was permitted to use obscene language; playing cards for liquor. The renting of houses for the playing of cards was also forbidden. Teams were not allowed to be unhitched while attached to wagons, and vagrants were fined $10- In short, the police team were kept busy. These details are taken from "The Mineral wells Police Department 1882-1988" by Kaye Ashby, in the custody of the Boyce Ditto Library.
[Mineral Wells' Municipal Airport]
An aerial View of Mineral Wells Municipal Airport and Downing (named after Colonel Wayne Downing, who was killed in a stateside accident) Heliport is shown here. In 1946, the City of Mineral Wells obtained use of the airport, although the Department of Defense retained an "Emergency-use" provision until 1966--after which year it was not renewed. In April 1966, the Department of Defense leased 970 acres from the City of Mineral Wells to build a heliport ("To improve helicopter training", it was stated) that was due to be completed by September of that year. The Fort Wolters "Trumpet" reported the progress of the construction of the heliport in detail in its subsequent numbers.
Mineral Wells News (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 26, No. 39, Ed. 1 Tuesday, September 17, 1957
Weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising.
[A Mineral Wells Orchestra]
Shown here is a clipping from a newspaper, showing the Mineral Wells Orchestra. Members are, top row: John Nance, Jeff Reimar, John (last name unknown) and an unidentified mandolin player; middle row is a string guitar quartet consisting of: Mrs. J.E. Johnson, Mrs. R. L. Yeager, Mrs. P. E. Bock, and an unidentified fourth lady; front row: Mrs. J.D. Cranford, John Muns, an unidentified person (perhaps a trombonist), and Mrs. I. N. Wynn. The clipping was cut short; some information is clearly missing.
[Mineral Wells Policemen]
On back of this photograph is written: "T. Row. L to R. Harry Shuffler, Gilbert Summerfield, L.D. Hill, Bill Patton & Odie Heath 1953 B. Row L. to R. Chief Frank Granbury, B Lain (probably "Blain") Price, John Fletcher, E. Scott Tobey & Alfred A Perkins" The picture was donated to the Mineral Wells Heritage Association on February 12, 1988, by Scott Tobey.
A Mineral Wells Public Schools Certificate of Promotion
A certificate of Promotion from Mineral Wells Public Schools, certifying that Floy Stone has completed the 8th grade in May 1903 is shown here. It is signed by B. C. Osborn.
Mineral Wells Sanitarium
The Mineral Wells Sanitarium was located at 315 NW 1st Avenue. It was built by Mssrs. Blake Barber and H. M. Coleman, who were fashioning the "First building of this magnitude erected at Mineral Wells." It was listed in 1905 as being leased by Doctors J.M. Massie, and R. G. Braswell. It was later owned and operated by B.H. Milling before he built the Milling Sanitarium. The building burned in June of 1907, (as reported by the El Paso Daily Times in July 1907) with a loss estimated at $40,000. The inmates were all rescued--some narrowly. The fire started at the skating rink of the Palace Amusement Company, (a building valued at $5,000) which had just been finished, but not opened to the public. The Mineral Wells Bath House (which was empty at the time) was also a total loss, as was the Lithia Pavilion. Part of the Wann Hotel was destroyed along with thirty small frame structures. The total loss will be about $100,000 (as the same newspaper reports it). It was later torn down and replaced by Willimann's Pharmacy. The area was vacant before the sanitarium was built. Donkeys were pastured on it, but the wind brought notice of them to the guests in the Crazy Hotel, and they were forcibly removed. Currently [2010], the Woodsmen of the World club resides at this location.
Mineral Wells Sanitorium
An early edition of the Mineral wells "Index" states that two doctors have leased this building, but further details are not as yet [2014] forthcoming.
[The Mineral Wells Savings and Loan]
The Mineral Wells Savings and Loan was once located at 101 SE 1st Avenue. The First State Bank stands at this location as of 2008.
[The Mineral Wells Savings and Loan--and Lynch Plaza Parking Lot]
The Mineral Wells Savings and Loan was once located at 101 SE 1st Avenue. The Savings and Loan building, in this 1988 view (looking south down SE 1st Avenue), is in the left foreground on the southeast corner of Hubbard and 1st Avenue. Across SE 1st Avenue (to the right and west of the Savings and Loan) is the parking lot for Lynch Plaza. In the background, the next street south is SE 1st Street. The Dollar General store occupies the former Piggly Wiggly grocery store on the southeast corner of this next block (near the center of the picture), where Mineral Wells' first Post Office once stood. The Savings and Loan building was eventually torn down, and the First State Bank is now [2008] at this location.
[Mineral Wells Steam Laundry]
An edition of the Mineral Wells Daily Index for May 6, 1902 (Volume VIII, Number 1) states that the Steam Laundry had already been in operation for six years. A certain J. W. Beasley was listed as the manager. The article associated with the photograph of the Steam Laundry goes on to state that "2 additions have been added." It continues to boast much the same perquisites of the trade as do more modern-day laundries: "Thoroughly modern equipment", "A...competent staff", and "The best" service available anywhere in the city. "Pure, artesian [sic] water" was reputed to have been used in the cleaning process. A legend on the back of this photograph reads: "200 Block of NE 7th St." (The Daily Index of 1902 gives the address as "North Wichita Street.")
MINERAL WELLS TEXAS CARLSBAD WATER
This picture appears to be a label taken from a container of mineral water sold by the Texas Carlsbad Water Company. The label describes the water as "Purgative" and "Diuretic." DIRECTIONS state further: The average person requires from 8 to 12 glasses per day, but there are those who need less, and others for whom this quantity will not suffice. Hence drink such quantity as gives desired effect, be it small or great. One or two glasses taken hot, half hour before breakfast, will be found very effective. The label ends with the legend: This Label Censored [sic] by the Parker-Palo Pinto Co. Medical Society.
Mineral Wells, "The Carlsbad of America"
Booklet about the history of, the various services available at, and the attractions in and around Mineral Wells, ("The Carlsbad of America")Texas. Published in 1905, it contains many photographic illustrations and a local map. Please note the colophon at the bottom of the pamphlet: "An empire--a nation within a nation."
Mineral Wells Volunteer Fire Department (Souvenir)
Shown here is the cover of a souvenir booklet published for the benefit of the Mineral Wells Volunteer Fire Department in 1906. It was issued as part of the Firemen's Pension and Relief Fund
[A Mineral Wells Water Cartoon]
Graphic representation of the combined effects of four common mineral concentrations of blended mineral water produced in Mineral Wells, Texas; it shows four bottles spouting water that form a stream of "Health and Happiness" to repel a skeleton (labeled "Disease") and other symbols of medicine (crutches, a wheelchair, and "Patent Medicine" Bottle). A flag over the water jugs says "Mineral Wells, the strongest fort in the world."
Mineral Wells Yesterday And Today
The caption to this picture indicates that there are two of them, taken from a common vantage point. This photograph dates from June, 1895, and it was taken from under the original Welcome sign. The view is to the southwest. The Methodist Church (the large white church with steeple) is in the foreground near the lower left corner. Above it, and slightly to its right (near the left edge and middle foreground), is an old two-story stone building which was occupied by the Bank of Mineral Wells. The second photograph, of Mineral Wells in a later time, is unfortunately not provided.
[A Mini-Park]
The women of Mineral Wells beautified the town by planting vacant lots. This "Mini-park" was located in the 200 block of Hubbard Street, and is now [2008] a parking lot adjacent to Murray's Grill.
[A Minstrel Show Program]
Shown here is presumably the program for a minstrel show (given in November of 1916) sponsored by the B.P.O.E. Please observe the advertisements (that presumably paid for the printing) on both the front and the back.
Montgomery Ward & Co.
The front of the photograph obviously reads: Montgomery Ward & Co. A hand-written legend reads: Mineral Wells, Texas Aug 24th 1929 The back reads: North Oak Ave. Built in 1929 Copyright A.F. Weaver. The Montgomery Ward Company went out of business in the '60's of the twentieth century.
Moore St [Now NE. 6th St.]
A view of Moore Street (now [2008] NE 6th Street) is shown here, looking east up Welcome Mountain, with the Hexagon Hotel on the left side of the street near the middle of the picture.
Mosquito Street, Looking North, Mineral Wells, Texas
Shown here is a postcard, reading "Mosquito Street [actually Mesquite Street], Looking North, Mineral Wells, Texas." Please note the Chautauqua Theater (1905-1912) at the end of the street. This picture was taken before street car tracks were installed in 1907. Also note the the absence of cars on the street--only horses and buggies.
[Mr. and Mrs. R.S. Dalton]
"Mr. & Mrs. R.S. Dalton on their 50th Wedding Anniversary as held in the second wooden structure of the First Baptist Church. Presiding is The Reverend Mr. Harlan Matthews." Robert (Bob) Dalton's father, Marcus L. Dalton, was killed by Indians on the Ft. Worth-Ft. Belknap military road in northeastern Palo Pinto County in 1870. Bob Dalton discovered the Dalton Oil Field on his ranch in north central Palo Pinto County, and the boom town that sprang up there was named Dalton City after him. He later moved to southwest Mineral Wells before building a large home, adorned with native rock, on 2101 NW 4th Avenue.
Mr. Lynch On His Way to Discover Mineral Wells
This picture is a photograph of a cartoon. See also "Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells" and "The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877." Please note the centipede, illustrated along with other forms of wildlife. Also, please note the Indians, who appear to be friendly. A.F. Weaver took this cartoon from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters" (q.v.) that is in the Palo Pinto County Album collection (q.v.) It is written in the nineteenth-century burlesque style, and need not be taken seriously.
[Mrs. Yokley Entertained the "Aid"]
A group of people sit and stand on the elaborately-decorated porch of a house. Written on the back are the following notes: Mrs. Yokley entertaining the "Aid." Standing - Mrs. Mollie Yokley, Mrs. John Beetham, Mrs. M. E. Paren (mother of Mrs. Bock), Mrs. M. Raines (mother of Mrs. McCracken), Mrs. Lock (a neighbor), Mrs. Veal and Nila, Mrs. J. H. McCracken. Sitting - Mrs. Provine, Mrs. Schneider, Mrs. Galbraith and Ann Lock, Mrs. Charles Harris, Mrs. G Montcastle, Mrs. W. L. Kearnes, Mrs. R. E. Bock, Mrs. Rosa Stevenson (a Dear Friend), Miss Lula Giraud (teacher and friend). Children - Bobby Provine, Edna Bock (on Pastor's lap), Drua Yokley and John C. Provine. J. W. McCall, Pastor.
[The Murphy Family]
A scene of children sitting in horse-drawn carriage, with a man leaning against the carriage house is illustrated here. A family home is shown in the background, with chickens, and a cow in the foreground. Information on back of photograph states "Looking west. Back of Murphy Home on East Mountain." Murphy was a builder in Mineral Wells with the firm of Goodrum, Murphy and Croft, Contractors. They built many of the buildings in the early part of the 1900's, including Mineral Wells High School (1915), Bimini Bath House, and the Norwood Hospital.
[The Murphy Home]
A picture taken of the Murphy home, taken about the turn of the twentieth century is shown here. The home underwent several renovations during Mr. Murphy's residency. The family at the time of this photograph consisted of two adults and three children. The home is located on East Mountain, and can be seen from most of North Oak Avenue. It was later known as the Brewer home. Mr. Murphy, a contractor, built many buildings in Mineral Wells, including the Mineral Wells High School and the second First Baptist Church.
Nazareth Hospital 25th Anniversary 1931-1956
We have here a copy of the cover of a booklet marking the 25th anniversary (1931 - 1956) of Mineral Well's Nazareth Hospital. The brochure contains pictures of the religious, medical, nursing and administrative staff, with interior scenes of departments, patients and equipment. The Mineral Wells Clinic was built soon after the current Crazy Hotel opened in 1927 to replace the Crazy Flats that burned in 1925. In 1931 the Holy Sisters of the Nazareth purchased the 46-bed facility for $135,000 and moved into the top floor of the building to live and minister to the patients. The hospital was closed in the mid 'sixties. The hospital was temporarily moved to the Crazy Hotel until the present [2009] hospital was built.
[NE 1st Avenue]
This photograph shows a scene of NE 1st Avenue. The stone building on the left is the "Yeager Building", which once housed the "Lion" Drugstore. At the time of the photograph, it housed Baker Medical Supply. A handwritten date on the back of the photograph states "1993." In 2007, the coffee shop "H2Jo" is located in this building. The next building up the street (and in the next block) was once the Hub Tailors, and the large three-story building farther up the street is the Western Auto Store. At the end of the street is the Old Post Office, which currently [2008] houses the Women's Club.
[Newspaper Clipping of Mineral Wells School, Texas]
A newspaper clipping with a photograph of a Mineral Wells School. This clipping had been mounted in a scrapbook, and the legible portion of the caption says, "Mineral Wells School, Texas." The whole caption read: Mineral Wells College. [sic]--A School for Both Sexes The building, which the Weatherford Democrat of September 12, 1895 says would be built in Mineral Wells (It would have been in Romanesque architecture), was to offer "Classical, Scientific, English, Music, Elocution, and Art Courses" . Professor J. McCracken was the head of the school. The building was never built, because the state provided education up to (but not including) college. A need for further education was not felt. .
[Newspaper Special - Rotary Convention, 1922]
A special "Rotary photogravure" edition for the Rotary Club Convention, Mineral Wells, that took place in 1922. The edition carries a panoramic view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain, and pictures of twenty Rotary officials and Convention Committee Chairmen. George Holmgren, District Governor (third from left), had Mineral Wells' WELCOME sign built in his San Antonio Iron Works, and donated it to the people of Mineral Wells that year.
[The North Entrance to Elmhurst Park]
The entrance to Elmhurst Park, Mineral Wells is shown here. The number "7830" in the upper left portion of the picture remains unexplained. The park was a recreational spot for the resort city. The park was closed in 1913, when trolley service was discontinued for lack of customers. As a direct result, the casino no longer exists, being also a casualty of the state's reform of gambling laws. It is now the site of the city sewage disposal facility.
North Front of Old School House
A north (side) view of the West Ward School, Mineral Wells' first High School. Built in 1902, located at 205 NW 5th Avenue, north of and on the same property as the old Rock School. The school served as both a High School and Elementary school until the East Ward School was built in 1906. When Mineral Wells High School was built in 1915, the West Ward name was changed to Houston Elementary School. It was torn down when a new Houston School was built in 1930. A note on the back of this photograph states "From Howard Album."
[North Oak Avenue ]
A street scene in Mineral Wells (looking north on Oak Avenue) approximately at the corner of North Oak Avenue and West Hubbard Street is shown here. Street car (running from 1907 to 1913) tracks are visible in the foreground, and the guy wires required to keep the power wire of the trolley in place festoon the sky. The Hexagon Hotel (opened in 1897)is visible towards the back of the picture. The Vichy (later the Beach, and then later still, the Standard) well is barely visible across from the Hexagon Hotel. The streets of Mineral Wells were not paved until 1914. Please observe the utter absence of automobiles.
[North Oak Avenue Street Scene]
A street scene of North Oak Avenue, looking north from Hubbard Street, taken about 1930, includes businesses as: Palace Drug Company, Owl Book Store, American Cafe, Poston Dry Goods, Max Miller's Shoe Store, Caldwell Hotel, Texas Power and Light, Bath House and Crazy Water Hotel. Please note that the street has been paved, and a traffic light is present.
[A North Oak Streetcar at Elmhurst Park]
A trolley car, and, presuably, passengers, are shown here at the front of entrance to Elmhurst Park. Elmhurst Park was active in the early years of the twentieth century,its career being ended by about 1940. People leaning against trolley car wear what is now [2008] considered "Vintage" clothing. One set of tracks seems to be overgrown by grass; tufts of grass also appear on the other set of tracks. No explanation has been put forward to clarify this situation.
North Oak U. S. O.
This building was erected during World War II as a USO. Many Hollywood stars performed there for the troops during the war. It is now [2009] the North Oak Community Center.
[The Norwood Hospital]
A photograph of the Norwood Hospital during its completion. Note the "Parry and Spicer Architects" sign and the "Goodrum, Murphy and Croft Contractors" sign. Dr. Norwood was the first Osteopathic doctor to set up business in Mineral Wells. He departed this life at the age of 82 in 1953. The building was donated to the Mineral Wells Historic Foundation. Plans were announced to convert the clinic to a Bed and Breakfast facility, but no progress towards such a conversion has been made to date [2007]. The legend "1863" appears on the photograph, but it is not known what it signifies. It cannot possibly be the date of the building--or of its photograph.
NW 6th Street-1906
A legend on the photograph announces: "NW 6th Street: 1906." It shows two children on donkeys and a horse and wagon. The view is west from Welcome Mountain (now East Mountain.) It appears that the old McCutcheon home (now [2008] the Gil Hull home) can be seen on the right at 612 NW 6th Street.
Oak Street, Looking North
An early view of Oak Street (now Oak Avenue), looking North is shown here. The first intersecting road is Hubbard Street. Part of the Oxford Hotel is visible on the southeast corner of Hubbard and Oak. Please note the utter lack of street lights. Street car tracks and an overhead cable run on Oak. Mineral Wells Electric System (Street Car) ceased operation in 1913. The downtown streets were paved in 1914. A hardware store, possibly Davidson's, is on the southwest corner of Hubbard and Oak.
Oak Street, Looking South
This picture shows the 100 block of what is now N. Oak Avenue, looking south. The "Palace Saloon" sign is still visible in 2008. The Palo Pinto County Courthouse Annex currently [2010] occupies the building that once housed Poston's Dry Goods (just down the street from the Palace Saloon). Please note the absence of trolley tracks--or the festoon of wires required to keep its power-line in place. The unpaved street dates the photograph prior to 1914, and probably prior to the previous picture.
Oak Street , Looking South
We have here a picture of Oak Street, looking South. The Poston Company and the Palace Saloon are easily visible in photograph. The wording "Fishburn Dallas" appears on the photograph. The unpaved street, several horses and wagons in picture date the picture to an era before 1914, when the street was paved.
Oak Street, Mineral Wells, Texas
This picture purports to show North Oak Avenue,(the photograph reads "Oak Street")of Mineral Wells, Texas,in the 100 block--looking north. The Mineral Wells Electric Railway operated from 1907 to 1913, and streets were paved in 1914. Visible are: A horse-drawn hack with passengers, a streetcar, automobiles, numerous people on sidewalks, and businesses along the street. The streetcar (Apparently working on air: The electric line required to power it is nowhere in sight)is passing the Poston Dry Goods store on its right. The Hexagon Hotel (opened December 1897)is possibly visible in the distance. A steeple is barely visible on the skyline at the left (west) side of the street.
The Oaks
The Oaks, at NW 3rd Avenue and 3rd Street, burned in 1908 along with the Presbyterian Church. The church steeple can be seen at the left. A later view of the building (with concrete sidewalks) is found on page 103 of A. F. Weaver's 1974 book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition.
The Oaks
Once located at NW 3rd Avenue and 3rd Street, the Oaks met its doom in a fire that destroyed it--and the nearby Presbyterian church--in 1908. A different picture of the hotel appears in A.F. Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells on page 103. The picture appears to have been excerpted from an advertising bulletin. Copy found around the negative's picture does not appear to relate directly to the hotel, but further text (that was not conserved) may have mentioned this particular hotel. A colophon in the lower right-hand corner of the photograph identifies it as the work of "Evans Photo Mineral Wells."
[Oden's Drive Inn]
This restaurant and grocery store was once located at 3403 Highway 280 east in Mineral Wells. It is no longer [2012] in existence. The photograph shows 1940's and 1950's cars parked in front. The Odens resided above the business.
The [Old] City Hall
This picture shows the old Mineral Wells City Hall at 202 N. Oak Avenue. Police, who were on foot, were summoned to the police station by a red light in the dome of the Baker Hotel before the two-way radio came into use. The City Hall was later located at 215 [Weaver's book, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", on page 152, says 211] S.W. 1st Avenue with Fire and Police station at 215 [the book says 212] S. Oak--east of the City Hall.