Boyce Ditto Public Library - Browse


[A Christmas Card from Boyce Ditto]

Description: Christmas card sent to Mrs. Weaver, signed "Boyce Ditto." The front cover has a picture of greenery decorated with red bells and silver balls; at the top it says "To A Special Friend." The inside has a similar illustration in the center with text on either side. The text on the left says, "Friends as fine/ as you are/ Don't often come/ one's way./ And special times/ like Christmas/ Don't happen every day." The text on the right continues: "And so this/ Christmas greeting/ Is coming to extend/ This wish--/ 'A Merry Christmas/ To a very/ special friend!'"
Date: unknown

"Crazy" Water Crystals Plant

Description: The "Crazy" Water Crystals Plant was built in 1919. Mineral water was boiled down in the plant, until only the mineral crystals were left. The crystals became an early version of "instant food" when dissolved in water. Radio advertising in the 1930's over the Texas Quality Network, direct from the lobby of the Crazy Hotel, developed a market for the "Crazy Water Crystals" all over the world. This picture of the plant has been computer-enhanced.
Date: unknown

[Dismuke's Famous Mineral Crystals Label]

Description: One of the by-products of the water which made Mineral Wells famous was mineral crystals, which were shipped all over the world. Purchasers could dissolve the crystals in tap water and (reportedly) receive the same benefits from the reconstituted water as from the well water. The Famous Water Company and the Famous Crystal Company were founded by Ed Dismuke, a druggist from Waco who came to Mineral Wells for his health. The Famous Water Company is still in operation (under different ownership) and it is the only mineral water company in Mineral Wells at this time. Ed Dismuke is buried in Elmwood Cemetery. He died in 1957 at the age of 97.
Date: unknown

The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877

Description: This photograph illustrates a cartoon. "1880" is written in ink at bottom of the photograph, evidently in correction of the cartoon. Lynch arrived in what would later be Mineral Wells in 1877. His first well, dug to forty-one feet in 1878, was dry. The second well, drilled deeper, was in 1880. Please see also "Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells" and "Mr. Lynch on His Way to Discover Mineral Wells." The cartoon appears to have been taken by A. F. Weaver from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters" which is in the holdings of the Palo Pinto County Album (q.v.). The booklet was written in the nineteenth-century burlesque tradition, and Weaver makes no comment on the cartoon or the booklet.
Date: unknown

[The Lynch Cabins]

Description: A drawing of the Lynch cabins, done by Jarmon Alvis Lynch, grandson of James Alvis Lynch. The drawing says "Alvis Lynch 77" in the bottom right-hand corner. The picture was apparently done from memory. The original mineral water discovery well is in the right foreground, with a windlass for drawing water. "Judge" Lynch and his family did not arrive in Millsap Valley until Christmas 1879. Note the tents in the right background. H. M. Berry, Mineral Wells' first teacher, noted in an article that when the reputation for the curative powers of the water spread, the area looked like "an army on the move" with health-seekers temporarily camping in tents until housing could be built for them.
Date: unknown

Mr. Lynch On His Way to Discover Mineral Wells

Description: This picture is a photograph of a cartoon. See also "Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells" and "The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877." Please note the centipede, illustrated along with other forms of wildlife. Also, please note the Indians, who appear to be friendly. A.F. Weaver took this cartoon from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters" (q.v.) that is in the Palo Pinto County Album collection (q.v.) It is written in the nineteenth-century burlesque style, and need not be taken seriously.
Date: October 16, 2006

The Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells

Description: A.F. Weaver obtained this cartoon from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters", now in the Palo Pinto County Album collection (q.v.). The booklet is written in the nineteenth-century burlesque tradition, and is not meant to be taken seriously. See also the cartoons "The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877" and "Mr. Lynch on His Way to Discover Mineral Wells."
Date: unknown

The Right Ticket

Description: An old advertisement for Mineral Wells, touting the "pleasures" to be had in the city. The lady's crown displays the legend "Health & Pleasure." The "Pleasures" obtainable in the city need not be discussed, as they are plainly describedd in the picture, which may be found on page 91 of the second edition of A. F. Weaver's book, "Time Was..."
Date: unknown

[Souvenir Views of Mineral Wells, Texas]

Description: A pamphlet, shaped like a water bottle, with illustrations of the Mineral Wells area. Some pictures include unidentified visitors to the area that are enjoying the outdoor natural beauty. The statement "Patent and Trademark applied for by the Yeager Drug Company" is located on the lower left-hand portion of the photograph.
Date: unknown

Time Was in Mineral Wells

Description: The dust cover of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells... 1975 Edition," considered the first pictorial history of the city, is illustrated here. The book is the product of A.F. Weaver, whose collection of photographs comprises the "A. F. Weaver Collection."
Date: unknown