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ABOUT BROWSE FEED

[A Street Scene: Highways 281 and 180]

Description: A picture, looking north on US Highway 281 from NW 1st Street to its intersection with US highway 180 (Hubbard Street). The first building on the right is Lynch Plaza, the location of the discovery of the mineral water well that gave Mineral Wells its name and made it the leading health spa in the state. Other businesses are: Cole's Florist on the west (left) corner of the block opposite Lynch Plaza, Poston's Dry goods (the low building in middle of block north of Cole's), First State Bank on the corner north of Lynch Plaza. The Crazy Hotel can be seen in the distance; three blocks up the street on the left. Oak Street was widened, with turn lanes, in 2005.
Date: 2005

[The Baker Hotel Roof Garden]

Description: This photograph is identified as "Baker Hotel Roof Garden February 1999." Two chandeliers are still in place on the ceiling, but the missing floor boards, the peeling paint, and the deserted condition of the room are indicative of the sad condition of a once beautiful ballroom. A ballroom on the twelfth floor was titled "The Cloud Room" by virtue of the clouds painted on its ceiling. A picture of it has yet [2014] to be found.
Date: 1999

[A Panorama of Mineral Wells, Texas: Looking East]

Description: Shown here is Mineral Wells, Texas looking east. This photograph was taken from Northwest Mountain, by A.F. Weaver on September 5, 1997. The Baker Hotel is in the center of the picture, with the Second Crazy Water Hotel in front of and left of the Baker; and the Nazareth Hospital, to the left of the Crazy Hotel.
Date: 1999

[The Weatherford, Mineral Wells, Northwestern Railroad Depot]

Description: The Weatherford, Mineral Wells, and Northwestern (WMW&NW) Railroad began operations October 1,1891. The Texas & Pacific Railway bought out the WMW&NW in 1902, and shortly thereafter built this depot to replace a former wooden structure that had been destroyed by fire. The rail line had a colorful history, operating through World War II and into the 1990's. Construction of an extension of the line to the city of Oran was completed in 1907, and on to Graford the following January. In 1912 two McKeen motor coaches (called "Doodlebugs" by the locals)were added. These were self-contained, 200 Horsepower, 70-foot long, gasoline-powered, 80-passenger coaches which provided service between Mineral Wells, Weatherford, Fort Worth and Dallas. A round trip took less than six hours, and two "Doodlebugs" provided service in each direction every three hours. In 1913, the Gulf Texas and Western Railroad, building south from Seymour, Texas, began operations over the WMW&NW line from Salesville to Mineral Wells, thus connecting the cities of Seymour, Olney, Jacksboro, Graford, Oran, Salesville, Mineral Wells, and Weatherford with daily round-trip service to Dallas. In 1928, passenger traffic had declined to a point that passenger service was discontinued, and did not resume until the nation began mobilizing for World War II in 1940. Nearly a half million troops (429,966) passed through the depot during the war years in transit to and from Ft. Wolters training base. The City of Mineral Wells bought the 22.8 miles of track to Weatherford October 1, 1989. It was the last operator, and kept the road open for freight traffic, for the benefit of local businesses. The passenger depot was restored after the trains ceased operations, and it is now [2008] the offices of the Elliott Waldren Abstract Company, and lawyer George Gault. The right-of-way from Mineral Wells to Weatherford was converted ...
Date: 1990?

[Lynch Plaza 3 of 3]

Description: Lynch Plaza, in the center of this picture, is located on the corner of North Oak and East Hubbard Streets. This structure, originally called the Firstron Building, replaced the First National Bank at this location. The bank was located in the northwest corner of the Oxford Hotel. The hotel building, including the bank, was destroyed by fire in 1983.
Date: September 1988

[The East Side of the (Third) First Presbyterian Church Building]

Description: This picture shows the back (east) side of the third First Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, Texas. It features an arched window, and (presumably) the dedicatory cornerstone. Due to structural damage, this building was torn down in the 1980's, and replaced with the fourth First Presbyterian Church-- the third building at 300 NW 4th Avenue.
Date: 1980
Creator: A. F. Weaver

[First Presbyterian Church - 2 of 13: SW Corner]

Description: This picture is the second in a series about the First Presbyterian Church, showing the juncture of the south side of the building and the main entrance, which was at the southwest corner of the building (left in the photograph.)
Date: 1980
Creator: A. F. Weaver

[First Presbyterian Church -7 of 13: Dome Detail]

Description: The seventh in a series of pictures of architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells, this picture is a close-up of the dome atop the sanctuary.
Date: 1980
Creator: A. F. Weaver

[First Presbyterian Church -- 9 of 13: South Side]

Description: This photograph is the ninth in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the Presbyterian Church. This picture is a view of the south side of the church, including, at left, the main entrance at southwest corner of building.
Date: 1980
Creator: A. F. Weaver

[First Presbyterian Church - 12 of 13: Front View]

Description: This is the twelfth picture in a series of pictures showing architectural details of the First Presbyterian Church prior to its demolition. This is a general view of the church from the southwest corner of the building.
Date: 1980
Creator: A .F. Weaver