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[The Wells Hotel]

Description: This is a picture of the Wells Hotel, in the W. E. Mayes Building, once located on the northwest corner of Northwest 1st Avenue and Northwest 3rd Street. This photograph appears on page 105 of the "Time Was", Second Edition. Please note the complete lack of automobiles in the picture. Although it is not apparent from the photograph, the street is not likely to have been paved. The picture was most likely taken in the early years of the twentieth century.
Date: unknown

[The West Texas Chamber of Commerce Parade, 1925]

Description: The West Texas Chamber of Commerce Parade, moving west on NE 2nd Street in Mineral Wells is shown here. The parade was staged to welcome the 1925 Convention. Businesses include R. O. Norman and Company, Dry Cleaners; the Whatley-Maddox Motor Co (Ford and Lincoln); the Mineral Wells Sanitarium; and the United States Post Office.
Date: unknown

[The West Ward School, East (Front) View ]

Description: The West Ward School, Mineral Wells' second public School, was built in 1902. It was located north of the old Rock School at 205 NW 5th Avenue. It served as both a High School and Elementary school until the East Ward School was built in 1906, and High School classes were moved there. The West Ward School was renamed the Houston Elementary School when the Mineral Wells High School was built in 1915. The building was torn down after a new Houston Elementary School was built in 1930.
Date: unknown

[Where the "Doodle Bug" Crossed the "Dinky Car" Tracks]

Description: Illustrated here is the intersection of the "Doodle Bug" and "Dinky Car" tracks at the southwest corner of the Gibson Well property, NW 6th Street and NW 2nd Avenue. There were two "Doodle Bug" gasoline-powered motor coaches. The first one ran from Mineral Wells to Graford on the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railroad (WMWNW) tracks. It was joined later by a second similar coach that ran from Mineral Wells to Seymour on the Gulf Texas and Western (GT&W) line. Two Dinky Cars, gasoline-powered motor cars on the Lakewood Scenic Railway, made round trips each quarter hour from the Mineral Wells depot to Lake Pinto. The Dinky cars, Esther and Suzie, were named after (banker and co-owner) Cicero Smith's daughters. The cars were joined in 1908 by a larger car--the Ben Hur. In the photograph the narrow-gauge dinky tracks running east-west along 6th Street crossing the wider standard-gauge railroad tracks running north-south (left to right in the picture.) The Gibson Well park and drinking pavilion are also shown in the picture.
Date: unknown

[A Window in the "Texas Carlsbad Water"]

Description: This photograph illustrates one of the painted-glass windows that was installed around 1915 at the Texas Carlsbad Water. It shows a bottle of "#3", extolling its efficacy against "Stomach and Liver Disorders. The Texas Carlsbad Water no longer [in 2012] exists. The picture occurs in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...." on page 63.
Date: unknown

[Women in a Truck]

Description: An unknown group of six women is shown posing on a truck. The type of truck is also not known. There are two photographs of this group of women with not a clue concerning who they might have been. The Bimini Bath House (and a horse-drawn wagon) are in the background. See also, the photograph "Five Women on Bridge."
Date: unknown

[A Women's Basketball Game at Elmhurst Park]

Description: Games at Elmhurst Park in 1910 included women's basketball. The players here are wearing the typical basketball uniforms of "genteel ladies" of the day. Girls and ladies played on half of a normal basketball court with both teams shooting at the same basket. The game was restarted with a "jump ball" after each goal or foul (read: "Rule infraction").
Date: unknown

[The Women's Corps, Palo Pinto County Civil Defense]

Description: The Women's Corp, Palo Pinto County Civil Defense. The photograph pictures 13 (unnamed) women, a young girl, and A. F. Weaver during a flag presentation. Mr. Weaver, a Ham Radio operator, set up the Palo Pinto County Civil Defense on October 1, 1972 and was the director for 26 years. Mr. Weaver was also the author of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", a photographic history, first published in 1975. The book was revised and published again in three subsequent editions.
Date: unknown

[The Woodmen of the World -- 1905]

Description: Mineral Wells was a popular convention city in its heyday. This photograph is part of the group attending a convention of the Woodmen of the World in Mineral Wells. The picture was taken around 1905 at the Texas Carlsbad Well, once located at 415 NW 1st Avenue.
Date: October 30, 2006

[The Woodmen of the World - 1911]

Description: The picture was taken in 1911 during the Woodmen of the World convention. It shows the backside of the Crazy Flats, before the first Crazy Hotel sections were constructed. The buildings in the background are the four wings of the Crazy Well Water Company, "The Crazy Flats," where rooms for rent were also available. The first Crazy Hotel was built the following year, 1912, on the location where this convention gathering is pictured.
Date: October 30, 2006

[The Woodmen of the World Convention, 1911],

Description: This is another picture of the convention of The Woodmen of the World in 1911. Note the men holding symbolic axes. This picture represents half of a photographic panorama view. It was taken at the back of Crazy Flats, the Crazy Water Company's third Drinking Pavilion, that also offered rooms for rent. The first Crazy Hotel was built on this open lot the following year. Clark's Pharmacy and The Lithia Drug Company are also pictured behind and to the left of the "Crazy Flats."
Date: unknown

The Woodruff Cottage

Description: Copy around this picture states that the Woodruff Cottage was built by a Civil War veteran who came to Mineral Wells for his health in 1903. His health improved so much, writes the copy, that he decided to build a fine home here with rooms for visitors. A note on the back of the picture indicates the "Cottage" was opened in 1905. The copy also states that it was located one block north of the Crazy and Carlsbad wells, and became quite popular because of its convenient location.
Date: unknown

[The Yeager Block]

Description: This picture shows a white sandstone building on NE 1st Avenue named "Yeager Block." The original home of (what was often called) the Lion Drugstore, it once sported a metal statue of a lion mounted on the roof, which gave rise to the legend that the business was called "The Lion Drug." (Current living descendants of Dr. Yeager do not ever remember the drugstore being referred to by than name. However, a casual reference to it in 1912 refers to the store as "The Lion Drug.") It housed the Baker Medical Supply at the time of the photograph. A retail store in the left of the photograph is named "The Rural Route." A handwritten date on the back of the photograph gives the year as "1993." The coffee shop "H2J0" is located [in 2007] where "The Rural Route" used to be.
Date: unknown

[The Yeager Building]

Description: Shown here is a stone building named "Yeager Block" on NE 1st Avenue. The building originally housed what was called, (by some) "The Lion Drug Store", and once had a metal statue of a lion on its roof. It housed the Baker Medical Supply Company at the time of the photograph. A retail store in the left (south) of the photograph was named "The Rural Route." A handwritten date on the back is given as 1993. The coffee shop H2JO was located on the north part of the building in 2006. Mike Chamberlain Photography was located on the north end of the block in 2006. It is now [2008] closed.
Date: unknown

[The Yeager Building - Mineral Wells, Texas]

Description: The Yeager Building, located on the southwest corner of NE 1st Street and NE 1st Avenue is shown here. Concrete lettering in the gable atop the building (barely visible in the photograph)identifies it as "YEAGER BLOCK". The building once had a metal lion mounted atop it, giving rise to the story that the business was named "The Lion Drug." Descendants of Dr. Yeager do not recall the place's ever having that name. A casual reference to the building in 1912 gives it as "The Lion Drug", however. The metal lion met its fate by being donated for scrap in a drive for metal during World War II.
Date: unknown