Boyce Ditto Public Library - 115 Matching Results

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Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 43, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 16, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 29, Ed. 1 Thursday, November 10, 1904
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 10, Ed. 1 Thursday, June 29, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 12, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 13, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 19, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 31, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 11, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 6, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
The Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 14, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 21, 1904
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 51, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 13, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
The Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 12, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 7, 1904
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 16, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 10, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 3, Ed. 1 Thursday, May 11, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 50, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 6, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 4, Ed. 1 Thursday, May 18, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 18, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 24, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 14, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 27, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 47, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 16, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 1, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 27, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 21, Ed. 1 Thursday, September 14, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 5, Ed. 1 Thursday, May 25, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
The Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 15, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 28, 1904
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 7, Ed. 1 Thursday, June 8, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 13, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 20, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 41, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 2, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 49, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 30, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 8, Ed. 1 Thursday, June 15, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 2, Ed. 1 Thursday, May 4, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 52, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 20, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 17, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 17, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 20, Ed. 1 Thursday, September 7, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 46, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 9, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
The Daily Index. (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 3, No. 87, Ed. 1 Wednesday, August 13, 1902
Daily newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
The Daily Index. (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 1, Ed. 1 Saturday, May 5, 1900
Daily newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 15, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 3, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
[The Arch] "Welcome Ye Editors"
This picture of the arch, erected to welcome the members of the Texas Press Association (who held a meeting in the nearby Chautauqua auditorium--visible in the background), was taken from East Hubbard Street, looking North on Mesquite Street. The Texas Press Association held its meeting on May 21-23, 1908. A note with the photograph states "The group of people were attending the Odd Fellows Convention and/or Press Convention." The note also states that "Bill Cameron (Who was an editor of the Mineral Wells Newspaper. He was about 21 at this time) has an Odd Fellows Apron [sic] on. Aprons, however, are not in evidence in the picture. The men are shown assembled under the standard of a lodge (on the right-hand side, whose legend is barely legible), and they are wearing variously-decorated tippets (except, of course, for the man in the center, who is wearing a sash, and the men at the ends, three of whom wear sashes; and the others, who are wearing uniforms, bandoleers and plumed fore-and-aft hats). The organization has been tentatively identified as the Eagles, whose lodge was said to be organized in Mineral Wells in 1906.
"Where the Famous Crystals Are Made"
This is a photograph of a building with a sign that says, "Famous Mineral Wells Crystal Plant." There is a hill, covered in trees, behind the building. Writing at the bottom of the image reads: "Where Famous Crystals Are Made." Ed Dismuke, a druggist from Waco, came to Mineral Wells for his health after his family physician told him he only had a "short time" to live. After miraculously regaining his health, which he credited to the mineral waters of his new hometown, he sold water by the drink at the Damron Hotel, later opening his own company, The Famous Water Company. He also opened The Famous Mineral Crystal Plant on the east side of Lake Pinto in partnership with local banker Cicero Smith. The two also organized The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway with its two gasoline-powered "dinky cars" named "Esther" and "Susie" after Smith's daughters. This is a picture of the plant where Famous Crystals, labeled "Pronto Lax" were made. Dismuke had outlived the doctors who had told him he only had a short time to live when he died at the age of ninety-four.
Cafe Royal
Only a caption on the photograph identifies it as the Cafe Royal. This building that houses it, on the N.W. corner of NW 1st Avenue and 3rd Streets, was known as the W.E. Mayes Building. Upstairs rooms were rented under the name of the "Carlsbad Hotel" in recognition of the nearby Carlsbad Drinking Pavilion at the opposite (or NE) corner of the block: 700 NW 2nd Avenue. (The first edition of "Time Was in Mineral Wells", page 105, identifies it as the Wells Hotel.)
The Curtis House
The Curtis House was an early hotel at 315 E. Hubbard Street, where the Baker Hotel swimming pool is now [2008] located. This picture was handed down through the Curtis family to Robert Curtis, who donated it to A.F. Weaver June 25, 1996. A later view of the hotel is found on page 101 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells."
James Alvis Lynch, Founder of Mineral Wells
This is a photograph of James Alvis Lynch, who founded Mineral Wells in 1881, is wearing a suit, sitting on a donkey, and holding a bottle of mineral water on an unknown rocky hill.
Exchange Hotel
[The] Exchange Hotel (also known as [The]Plateau in 1909, and later as the Hospital) was built on the site of the Cliff House, which was destroyed by fire. The house to the right was built in 1896 by Dr. A. W. Thompson as a wedding present for his second wife. The Mineral Wells Post Office was built on the vacant lot at the left of the hotel in 1912. The Hotel presents something of a conundrum. An annotation without date states that the Exchange Hotel was destroyed by fire and the Plateau Hotel was built in its place. A notation of 1902 states that the Plateau Hotel was the only brick hotel. A 1907 map shows the Hotel as being at 207 East Coke (Now NE 2nd Avenue) Street. In 1909, a St. Paul Sanitarium was listed at 118 NE 7th Street. .A map of 1912 shows the Plateau Hotel as still being in existence. The city directory of 1920 shows no building in the 200 block--except for the Post Office. A Mineral Wells City Directory of 1924 listed the former Exchange/Plateau building as the Mineral Wells Sanatorium. Dr. A.W. Thompson was still living in the house to the right at the time. In 1924, the Mineral Wells Sanitarium was listed as being at 211 NE 2nd Street, and a Hotel Wilson (with no room for a third building) at 211 NE 2nd Street. In 1928, the Mineral Wells Sanitarium was listed at 211 NE 2nd Street. By 1937, there was no listing in the City Directory. It is presumed that the Hotel/Hospital was finally demolished.
Old Elmhurst Park , Allen & Charles,1907
Two people are shown standing on the wooden bridge at Elmhust Park, Mineral Wells, in 1907. A holograph inscription on the photograph that reads "Old Elmhurst Park, Allen & Charles, 1907", probably refers to the man and boy in the picture. Elmhurst Park, a very popular recreation area during its heyday, was located in southwest Mineral Wells at the end of the streetcar line. Patrons walked from the streetcar (in the background) across the wooden bridge to the Casino and other attractions.
Casino
A (gambling) Casino at Elmhurst Park was located in southwest Mineral Wells, Texas, at the turn of the twentieth century. The structure was a large stucco building facing Elmhurst Lake (created by a dam on Pollard Creek) in the foreground. The lake was sometimes referred to as "Pollard Lake." Elmhurst Park was served by the Mineral Wells Electric Railroad (Street Car), with whom it seemed to have had a symbiotic relationship; both came into existence about 1903, and both went out of business about 1913.
West Side School -- Second Grade 1907
The second grade class at West Side School in 1907 sit on the steps outside the old rock building built in 1886. The teacher is Miss Amie Hensley. Some of the names of the children are listed on the back.
A Mineral Wells Public Schools Certificate of Promotion
A certificate of Promotion from Mineral Wells Public Schools, certifying that Floy Stone has completed the 8th grade in May 1903 is shown here. It is signed by B. C. Osborn.
[The St. Nicholas Hotel]
A group of men stand in front of the St. Nicholas Hotel. A colophon at the lower right designates this picture as a photographic souvenir from Minerals Wells, taken by Dan W. Evans. The building had a varied history. It was first (in 1904) an unnamed two-and-one-half-story sanitarium, then re-named the St. Nicholas Hotel, and then later it became the Delaware Hotel. It was located at N. Oak and NE 3rd Street. The building was eventually consumed by fire on October of 1907. The back of photograph has a T and P Railway logotype and this information about the Jericho Fine Photo Company: "Mountain and Donkey Groups, View Souvenirs and Scenery of Min-Wells, Kodak Supplies and Finishing, Button and Stamp Photos a Specialty. Dan W. Evans Prop. Min Wells, Tex."
Looking South on Mesquite Street
A street scene, identified as Mesquite Street (now NE 1st Avenue)and looking south, taken at the turn of the twentieth century, shows businesses that antedate the coming of the automobile. On the right, in the middle of the picture, the Yeager Building is shown with a stone lion mounted on its roof. Many historians now refer to this building as the Lion Drug Store. However, current Yeager descendants now living in Mineral Wells do not remember the store as ever being named anything but The Yeager Drug Store. The third building on the left (with the spire on top) was the Star Well whose manager, Frank Richards was an active participant in Mineral Wells' early business and social activities. At the end of the street is Mineral Wells depot built in 1902. Absence of the "Dinky Car" tracks in the middle of the street indicates that the picture was taken prior to the building of the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway in 1905.
Lower End of Mesquite Street
A view of Mesquite Street (in 2008: NE 1st Avenue), taken in 1910, and looking south-east. The scene shows horse-drawn wagons loaded with cotton bales. Electrical lines are visible. The building at the northeast corner of East Hubbard Street and South Mesquite Street is the D.M. Howard Block. D. M Howard was the first of five Howard brothers to come to Mineral Wells and establish businesses. There was a Dry Goods store on the left end of the building, a millinery shop above it, and a grocery store was in the building to the right. Later the J.M. Belcher Furniture occupied the building; and still later, R&W Furniture. Demolition of the building began March 17 of 1975 to make room for the Savings and Loan Building and a parking lot. The First State Bank now [2007] occupies this entire block.
[The Gulf and Brazos Valley Railroad Depot]
A caption to the photograph states: "Gulf and Brazos Valley Railroad Depot 1899-1902. Erected back some 80 years ago, and served the Brazos Valley Railroad from Mineral Wells to Peck City near Millsap, now known as Bennett." The area formerly known as Peck City is now the location of an Acme brick plant, and is named "Bennett" for the rail switch that serves the plant. Standing on the right in the photograph is Noble Nuttall, father of Verne Nuttall, the first depot operator and telegraph operator. Please note the guitar near the woman at the window. The depot was once located on the site now occupied by the Hayes Lumber Company, in the 300 block on SE 1st Avenue. The newspaper caption: "Passengers would ride on the Texas and Pacific to Peck City and come by the Brazos Valley train from Peck City to Mineral Wells" is incorrect. The GULF and BRAZOS RIVER RAILWAY was strictly a freight line that hauled coal from the Rock Creek mines (east of Mineral Wells) to the T&P main line at Peck City. The first depot in Mineral Wells for passenger service from Weatherford was built when the W.-M.W.-N.W. that first arrived in Mineral Wells in 1891. It burned down, and it was replaced by the current brick depot in 1902, the year the GBV was sold at a sheriff's auction in Weatherford. (Photo courtesy of Verne Nuttall)
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells (1 of 2)]
A view from West Mountain looking ESE, contains the following landmarks: The Hexagon Hotel (1895-1959) in the upper middle of the picture, and the Chautauqua (1905-1912) in the upper right. One block right (south) and one block this side (west) of the Chautauqua is Crazy Flats Drinking Pavilion (burned in 1925). The Sangura- Sprudel Well and Drinking Pavilion is below and left (one block north and one block west) of The Hexagon. The Fairfield Inn is one block plus north and east (left) of the Hexagon and about half way up East Mountain. The Vichy Well (Later known as The Beach and still later as the Standard Well) is on the right, and across the street from the Hexagon. It was later the location of the USO building in World War II, and is now [2006] the North Oak Community Center.
Fairfield Inn
The Fairfield Inn, built by Col. Walter H. Boykin around the turn of the twentieth century, was a very popular rooming and boarding house in the early days of Mineral Wells. It was located at 814 North Oak Street, across Oak Street and one block north of the contemporary Hexagon Hotel. Part of the retaining wall shown in the picture still exists. Mr. Boykin built his home at 1501 SE 4th Avenue. The home was later sold to William Whipple Johnson, who operated the Rock Creek coal mines in eastern Parker County around 1910. Mr. Johnson, with his brother Harvey, had previously opened the coal mines at Thurber on the Palo Pinto/Erath county line in 1908.
Bird's Eye-view of Mineral Wells
Two contiguous negatives, taken from East Mountain, looking Southwest are shown here. Please note that some landmarks have been numbered in ink on the photographs. On the first [upper] photograph (No. 3), the pavilion with the steeple on the roof,is the Hawthorne well, located at 314 NW 1st Ave. (No. 4), the large two-story structure, is the Crazy Drinking Pavilion. The Lithia Pavilion is the structure between the Hawthorne and Crazy pavilions. Note also the Hawthorn House (No. 5?), located on North Oak. The large livery stable in the left foreground has not been identified by name. Please note the Poston Building on the second [lower] photograph, on North Oak (not numbered, but the three-part building in the middle left of the photograph). Also, please note the two steeples of the first Catholic Church on NW 3rd Street, in the 600 block, on the side of West Mountain. The large two-story frame hotel (No. 2) in the left foreground has not been identified.