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Thompson-Cunningham Home

Description: This picture is, apparently, a page distributed during a 1975 "Tour of Homes." It is best viewed and read when enlarged on the computer screen. The picture is a copy of the one used on page 141 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. This house, at 215 NE 2nd Street, is Queen Anne style, spindle work subtype. It was restored in 2006 by Bill Pratt, Jr.
Date: unknown

The John Moore Home, 1911, 1 of 2: Interior

Description: An inscription on the photograph reads: "(John Moore Home) 1911." The original builder of the house was Hugh Coleman. John Moore occupied the house in the early twentieth century. Please note the period dress and furniture. The fireplace shows an "Arts and Crafts" style of construction. The names of the people pictured are not known. This picture appears to be that of a house now [2008]located at 915 NW 4th Avenue. Hugh M. Coleman was the head of H.M. Coleman & Co., dealers in "Everything that men wear." He is said to have accumulated a large number of rent houses, of which this might be one. (This information about Hugh Coleman is taken from the "Mineral Wells Index", special supplement, originally published May 6, 1907)
Date: unknown

[The Norwood Hospital]

Description: A photograph of the Norwood Hospital during its completion. Note the "Parry and Spicer Architects" sign and the "Goodrum, Murphy and Croft Contractors" sign. Dr. Norwood was the first Osteopathic doctor to set up business in Mineral Wells. He departed this life at the age of 82 in 1953. The building was donated to the Mineral Wells Historic Foundation. Plans were announced to convert the clinic to a Bed and Breakfast facility, but no progress towards such a conversion has been made to date [2007]. The legend "1863" appears on the photograph, but it is not known what it signifies. It cannot possibly be the date of the building--or of its photograph.
Date: 1900?

The John Moore Home, 1911, 2 of 2: Interior

Description: An inscription on photograph reads: "(John Moore Home) 1911." The original builder was Hugh Coleman. John Moore occupied the house at a later date. Please note the period dress and furniture. The names of the people pictured are not known. This photograph appears to show a house now located at 915 NW 4th Avenue.
Date: unknown

The Kingsley

Description: The Kingsley was built on the side of East Mountain around NW 7th Street, and was eventually destroyed by fire. The legend "The Kinglsey, Mineral Wells Texa." invites comentary, as "Texa" is not a proper abbreviation for "Texas." This photograph appears on page 102 of A. F. Weaver's pictorial history book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells..." Second Edition, 1988.
Date: unknown

The Welcome Sign on East Mountain, Mineral Wells, Texas

Description: This picture is taken from a postcard claiming that the "Welcome" sign on East Mountain is "reputed to be the largest non-commercial electric sign in U.S." It has been claimed that the "Hollywood" sign was inspired by the "Welcome" sign, but this is likely a folk legend. (The preceding picture is a black and white original of this tinted picture. A more complete description may be found there.)
Date: unknown

The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877

Description: This photograph illustrates a cartoon. "1880" is written in ink at bottom of the photograph, evidently in correction of the cartoon. Lynch arrived in what would later be Mineral Wells in 1877. His first well, dug to forty-one feet in 1878, was dry. The second well, drilled deeper, was in 1880. Please see also "Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells" and "Mr. Lynch on His Way to Discover Mineral Wells." The cartoon appears to have been taken by A. F. Weaver from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters" which is in the holdings of the Palo Pinto County Album (q.v.). The booklet was written in the nineteenth-century burlesque tradition, and Weaver makes no comment on the cartoon or the booklet.
Date: unknown

The Curtis House

Description: The Curtis House was once to be found at 315 E. Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells. This photograph of it is to be found on page 101 of "Time Was..." by A.F. Weaver. Note the steeple of Methodist Episcopal Church at 301 NE 1st Street, at the far right edge of the picture. Built in 1898, the church was expanded in 1903 as the First Methodist church, whose congregation still [2008] occupies this location in a newer church building.
Date: unknown

[The Penix Home ]

Description: The Penix Home (at 1001 SW 7th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas)was once owned by William H. Penix--partner of the law firm of Penix, Miller, Perkins, and Dean. He also served as vice-president of the Bank of Mineral Wells in 1920. The style is Queen Anne, Free Classic sub-type. It is shown here much-ravaged by time. Note the decayed "Gingerbread", the cut-away bay (not common in Mineral Wells),and the flat-topped tower, which is unlikely to have been original. The house was re-located in 1989 to an area north of town,now [2008] Bennett Road. Restoration of the house was completed in 1998.
Date: unknown

[An Old Map of Mineral Wells]

Description: An early cadastral map of Mineral Wells with the original street names, it also shows the unusual topography of the surrounding mountains. The streets were paved in 1914, and the street names were changed January 1,1920.
Date: unknown

Inside Information about the Waters

Description: A souvenir booklet, shaped like a bottle from Mineral Wells. It is almost devoid of information, except to note that it was printed by the Harris Service of Ft. Worth, Texas (with its advertising mark of an arrowhead). A copyright was applied for is the last bit of information on the pamphlet's cover.
Date: c. 1919

The Mineral Wells Guide

Description: The Mineral Wells Guide, as it itself proclaims, was published for the out-of-town visitor. It contains facts about Mineral Wells, instructions about how to reach Mineral Wells, the water and baths to be found there, the Milling Sanatorium, recreation in the city, and various advertisements.
Date: unknown