Boyce Ditto Public Library - 403 Matching Results

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[Walker's Grocery and Market]
Shown here is the J.J. Walker Grocery & Market, once located at 614 Southeast 6th Avenue. The picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 176. The identities of the three people pictured is not known at this [2015] time. Note, however, the hand-operated gasoline pumps, the oil pumps in the background, and a sign that advertises Texaco gasoline at 18 cents per gallon!
Mineral Wells Sanitorium
An early edition of the Mineral wells "Index" states that two doctors have leased this building, but further details are not as yet [2014] forthcoming.
[Three Women and a Man In Front of a Car]
Three unknown women and a man are shown standing in front of a large automobile. The man sports a celluloid collar & a straw hat. One lady carries a reticule, another an umbrella. Benches are visible behind them all. The date of the picture is also unknown, but the early 'twenties of the twentieth century is conjectured.
[A Rock Outcrop on Mineral Wells "Mountain"]
A rock outcrop, and vegetation typical of the hills (local custom calls them "Mountains") in Mineral Wells. Some of the houses of the town can be seen through the bushes. This photograph is one of 17 negatives that were in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography and postmarked Aug. 4, 1975. Some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)" were also on the envelope.
Kitchens & Mess Halls, Camp Wolters
A legend on the bottom of the photograph clearly reads: Left: Top, Entrance to Camp Wolters. Bottom, Kitchens and Mess Halls, Camp Wolters." It shows seven rock-faced buildings with a curb in front of them. Ash cans, and trash repositories--also rock-faced--are visible on left. Five men--unidentified--stand around. The date of the photograph has not been preserved, but Camp Wolters was the World War I and World War II predecessor of what was changed to Fort Wolters during the Vietnam Era.
[A View of the Baker Hotel]
Shown here is yet another view of the Baker Hotel in its days of glory.
[A View of Mineral Wells]
A set of buildings is shown here. The only buildings that have been identified with confidence are the Crazy Water Hotel, and the Nazareth Hospital, both at the right. The Baker occupies a small position on the extreme right.
[The Convention Hall and its Surroundings]
Shown here is the back side of the convention hall. The picture antedates its demolition. The surrounding buildings have not yet [2014] been identified.
[A View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
A view of Mineral Wells and South Mountain, taken from atop East Mountain is shown here. Notable buildings are the West Ward School next to the "Little Rock" school house in upper right and Poston Dry Goods in left-center. The photograph was taken before the second high school was built in 1914.
[Lake Mineral Wells, 1 of 4, Flood Stage]
Lake Mineral Wells, Mineral Wells State Park, is shown here in flood stage. Heavy spring rains dumped 7.2 inches of rainfall into the area over a violent week-end in March 1976, resulting in a flood that claimed 24 lives in fire- and water-related incidents. The dam is visible on the far left side of the picture, with water flowing over it. Flood waters cover a large part of the land between the photographer and the dam. The public boat ramp and fueling station are on the peninsula at the far right side of the picture. The picture is part of a group of films labeled "1977", but related news articles give the date as March of the previous year.
[Lake Mineral Wells, 2 of 4]
The dam of Lake Mineral Wells is shown here during a flood, March 1976. A large area of Palo Pinto and Parker counties received heavy rains (up to 7.2 inches in places) during a three-day period. The road directly below the dam was entirely under water, and the effect of water flowing over the road is barely visible. Heavy damage was also reported over a substantial part of the City of Mineral Wells as a result of the downpour.
[A Farm House]
Photograph of a farmhouse in Palo Pinto County (possibly near Thurber), visible at the end of a round driveway of red soil. The house is two stories tall and has a long row of dormer windows above a full-length front porch. Several vehicles are parked in front of the home. On the right side of the image, a white fence marks the boundary of the yard and hills covered in scrub are visible on the other side.
[Mineral Wells High School]
This view of Mineral Wells High School, taken from the east in 1940, shows the 1884 "Little Rock School House" (Mineral Wells' first public school) on the north side of the high school. The larger school was built at 101 NW 5th Avenue in 1915. The second high school in Mineral Wells, it still [2008] stands. Three other high schools have been built since the last class graduated from this one in 1955.
[Mineral Wells High School]
This photograph was taken at the completion of Mineral Wells High School in 1915. The Mineral Wells Independent School District donated the building to the Fifty Year Club in 2007.
A Hazy View of Mineral Wells
Photograph of the city of Mineral Wells, Texas, taken from a hill looking down at the buildings.
[The Hexagon Hotel]
The Hexagon Hotel at 701 N. Oak Avenue, opened in December 1897. The brick building to the right was the Convention Hall (built in 1925 on the foundation of the Hotel's electric plant) for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. The Hexagon Hotel was demolished in 1959, the Convention Center in 1977.
[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 3 of 3: The East Side of the Construction]
This series of photographs of the construction of Mineral Wells Savings and Loan was taken in 1975. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975, to make room for the Savings and Loan. D.M. Howard was the first of five brothers to arrive from North Carolina. He later sent for his other brothers to establish the Howard Brothers Department Stores complex in the early 1900's. The Baker Hotel, directly across E. Hubbard north of the Savings and Loan, is seen to the left of the picture. Across SE 1st Street, to the south, were the Piggly Wiggly Grocery store (at the site of Mineral Wells' first Post Office) and the S & H Green Stamp store. The First State Bank now [2012] occupies this entire city block.
[The Hexagon Hotel]
A large group of people, most sitting on donkeys, are shown out front of the Hexagon Hotel. Donkeys were used to transport visitors to the top of East Mountain for an overview of the City of Mineral Wells. It appears the party in this picture is preparing for such a trip. The Caldwell family ran the Hexagon Hotel as a boarding house for a while, hence the sign on the second floor of the building. H. L. Milling and his father also ran the hotel for a while, too. The building visible behind the hotel is the DC generating plant that supplied electricity to illuminate the building.
[The Home of Dr. C.F. Yeager at 300 NE 1st Street]
A note on the back of the print states that this home was located at 300 NE 1st Street. This home, of physician Dr. C.F. Yeager, stood next door and east of the Old Methodist Church, which may be seen on the left side of the photograph. Dr. Yeager's drugstore was one block west of his home at the SW corner of of NW 1st Street and NW 2nd Avenue.
[Men and a Woman Around a Microphone]
Five men and a lady are pictured congregating around a microphone. The word "Gulf" is seen obscurely on it. An alert-looking boy in the background holds a musical instrument, as does one of the men. A man in striped pants talks into the microphone. The occasion is entirely unknown.
[The Murphy Home]
A picture taken of the Murphy home, taken about the turn of the twentieth century is shown here. The home underwent several renovations during Mr. Murphy's residency. The family at the time of this photograph consisted of two adults and three children. The home is located on East Mountain, and can be seen from most of North Oak Avenue. It was later known as the Brewer home. Mr. Murphy, a contractor, built many buildings in Mineral Wells, including the Mineral Wells High School and the second First Baptist Church.
[Mineral Wells Steam Laundry]
An edition of the Mineral Wells Daily Index for May 6, 1902 (Volume VIII, Number 1) states that the Steam Laundry had already been in operation for six years. A certain J. W. Beasley was listed as the manager. The article associated with the photograph of the Steam Laundry goes on to state that "2 additions have been added." It continues to boast much the same perquisites of the trade as do more modern-day laundries: "Thoroughly modern equipment", "A...competent staff", and "The best" service available anywhere in the city. "Pure, artesian [sic] water" was reputed to have been used in the cleaning process. A legend on the back of this photograph reads: "200 Block of NE 7th St." (The Daily Index of 1902 gives the address as "North Wichita Street.")
Moore St [Now NE. 6th St.]
A view of Moore Street (now [2008] NE 6th Street) is shown here, looking east up Welcome Mountain, with the Hexagon Hotel on the left side of the street near the middle of the picture.
Paving Brick Plant
Shown here is a photograph of the Paving Brick Plant. In the lower right-hand corner is the legend: Young Studio Mineral Wells, Tex." It was established in 1921; electrified in 1925-1926; the company was sold in 1927, re-named "Reliance Brick Company." It is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells on page 162. Electrification was accomplished when the Texas Power and Light Company furnished an abandoned 500 h.p. stream-power plant for the job. It was fed natural gas by means of the Upham Gas Company's line. In 1927, the plant was the largest of its kind west of the Mississippi River. It confined its production exclusively to vitrified shale material. The manager in 1927 has been identified as A. E. Eaton, who was also instrumental in locating the plant in Mineral Wells.
[Photograph of the First Mineral Wells Golf Country Club]
A photograph of the first clubhouse of The Mineral Wells Golf and Country Club is shown here. This picture comes from Knights of Pythias Album, 1925. The swimming area and lifeguard station can be seen at the far left of the picture.
[An Un-named Water Well]
Since the mineral water that was needed for commercial purposes did not flow in convenient springs, it was necessary to pump it out of the ground by way of wells. The wells were abandoned when the fad for the water evaporated. For example, what remains of this water well (only its head) is at the North West corner of NW 9th Street and NW 3rd Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas.
[View from NW Mountain looking East]
View from NW mountain looking East. The North Oak Community center is visible.
[The Crazy Hotel Lobby]
This picture shows the First Crazy Hotel Lobby in 1913. The first Crazy Hotel was built in two sections; the first section, which contained this lobby, was built in 1912. The second section was added in 1914, and joined to the first with the two sections sharing this same sky-lighted lobby. A fire on March 15, 1925 destroyed the first Crazy Hotel along with all the other businesses in this block. The second Crazy Hotel, covering the entire city block, opened in 1927. It is now [2008] a retirement home. It was shut down--after much contention--in 2010.
[The Dam/causeway]
This picture shows the dam that formed Mineral Wells' first municipal water reservoir. This dam is probably the one that Thelma Doss refers to on page 51 of A.F. Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells." Its erection was credited to banker Cicero Smith in that article. Located southeast of the Cullen Grimes School, it is in the G. P. Barber Addition. The lake was actually built by George P Barber, and the water impounded behind it is known locally as Barber Lake. The lake served to supply water for Mineral Wells until banker Cicero Smith and Ed Dismuke (owner of Famous Water Company) built a dam on Pollard Creek, west of the city, to form Mineral Wells' second municipal water supply, Lake Pinto. The original photograph is one of 17 (4 X 4) negatives that were discovered in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975" and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. Some telephone numbers were visible on the envelope, as was the remark: "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)."
[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 1 of 3, The Baker Hotel is in the Background]
This series of photographs was taken in 1975, during the construction of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan at 101 SE 1st Avenue. The Howard Brothers Department Store was an early occupant of the site. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975 to make room for the Savings and Loan. A new First State Bank currently [2011] occupies this entire city block. A good view of the south side of the Baker Hotel is visible in the background.
[Photograph of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
Photograph of a view of Mineral Wells, taken from East Mountain, looking southwest. Poston Dry Goods is shown in the left foreground); the First Baptist Church (upper right); the Dr. A.W. Thompson residence in middle foreground, with Mineral Wells Sanatorium to its right (west).
[Penitentiary Hollow]
This is a photograph of a woman and young boy (both of them unidentified) posing among the tall rock formations at Penitentiary Hollow in Lake Mineral Wells State Park.
A July Crowd
This photograph,labeled "A July Crowd", shows a ladies' gathering about 1920. The photograph shows what is possibly a tea party or a ladies' club meeting. Some of the ladies shown were members of prominent Mineral Wells families. Identified in a typed note - and graph - accompanying the photograph are: (starting at back left) the 4th lady is Mrs. D. G. Galbraith [wife of the owner of the Hexagon House], the 8th is Mrs. E. F. Yeager [wife of Dr. E.F. Yeager, Pharmacist/ Owner of the Lion Drug Store), 16th is Mrs. J.H. McCracken [wife Dr. J.H. McCracken, president of the Texas Medical Association], 17th may be Mrs. Raines (Mrs. McCracken's mother); (middle row, starting in front of Mrs. Yeager) the second from left is Mrs. Dr. Beeler; (first row from left) the 3rd lady may be Mrs. Coon, the 6th lady is Mrs. Paul Bock, the 8th is Mrs. Reba Williams. The children in front are Langdon Bock on the left and Elizabeth Galbraith on the right. There were forty people in total.
[Construction of the Malsby Dairy]
Construction of the Malsby Dairy is shown here, going on apace. Steel girders are being put in place, presumably to support a future roof. It was located at 300 SE 1st Street. Construction began (it is conjectured) in the late 1940's. The building once housed a newspaper (in the 1960's) called "The Advance", and then the "Mineral Wells Index." The "Index" still [2007] occupies the building. Please note that only half of the men in the picture are shown wearing hard hats. Please note also the derrick mounted on the back of a truck. A hand-written legend on the photograph reads: "Malsby Creamery"
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 17 of 21: Two Individuals on the Street Northwest of the Fire]
Shown here is another view of the plume of thick black smoke at the height of the fire that completely destroyed the Damron Hotel December 22, 1975, along with two hard-hatted individuals (presumably fire-fighters) standing in the street. It was a very popular hotel during the mineral water industry's heyday through the "Roaring Twenties", Great Depression and World War II. By the time of the fire, however, one informant remarked--verbally--that no respectable lady permitted herself to be found within a block of the hotel. Sic transit, it would appear, gloria mundi.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 6 of 21: Bystanders Observing the Fire]
The Damron Hotel was destroyed (on December 22, 1975) in a spectacular fire that received extensive photographic coverage. The hotel was located at 109 W. Hubbard. This is another picture of that immense conflagration. All the firemen answered a call that came in at 9:08 on the morning of the fire. The City of Weatherford also sent men and equipment over to help. Volunteers who were not themselves firemen also helped. Other buildings that suffered damage were Pemberton's (an appliance store across the street and west of the hotel), and the hardware store (Bought by Bob Sturtivant) next to the hotel. Note the height of the flames in this picture taken in the later stages of the fire.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 11 of 21: Fighting the Fire on W. Hubbard St.]
Shown here is another picture in the series of photographs of the fire that destroyed the Damron Hotel during the holiday season of 1975. This smoke-shrouded scene of W. Hubbard, shows the front entrance to the hotel in the earlier stages of the fire's progress. The Damron was built in 1906, during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort spa. It burned completely on December 22,1975. The hotel's name was changed in 1917 when Mr. Holt (who had built the hotel) traded it to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. It was a very popular hotel through the "Roaring Twenties", the Great Depression and World War II.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 4 of 21, Fire Inside the Structure]
This is another view of the spectacular fire that consumed the Damron Hotel on December 22, 1975. The hotel was built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife. The name was changed in 1917 when the hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. The fire received extensive photographic coverage. Note the height of the flames in this picture, taken in the later stages of the fire.
[Mineral Wells' First Police Department]
Mineral Wells' first Police Department is shown on horseback here. On the far left is Jim Barrett, Chief, and in the middle is Paul Granbury. The man on the right remains unknown. This photograph comes from A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", page 153. The picture appears to have been taken at the photographer's souvenir picture stand on the donkey trail about halfway up East Mountain. J. C. McClure, an early photographer, first owned the donkeys for the trail; but he was killed while riding a wild stallion on Oak Avenue. J. L. Young and his wife took over the photographer's stand. They built a rock house, here as a background, for souvenir pictures. In 1895, a policeman (C.M. Harris) was appointed as City Marshall." A night watchman (A. Scott) was also appointed. Their respective duties were primarily fire prevention and keeping livestock from roaming the streets; and seeing to it that businesses were properly locked up. Boys under the age of 17 were forbidden from roaming the streets at night (under pain of a $10 fine). C.M. Harris was elected to his position in 1896, at a salary of $60 per month. In 1889, upon the sudden death of Frank Johnson, Harris was appointed Interim Marshall to "Inspect and supervise all premises and places of business." J.I. Johnson became night watchmen at the salary of $12.50, and he was charged with roaming the streets at nights to be on the lookout for fire. The City Marshall was expected to corral any stray dogs--and kill them if they were unclaimed. He was to remove the carcasses from the city limits afterwards. in 19001, an ordinance was passed forbidding the possession of pigeons in the city--the control of which fell to the City Marshall. [Note: Several kinds of dove ...
[Photograph of Suspension Bridge Over the Brazos River]
This is a photograph of a suspension bridge being built over the Brazos river near the town of Brazos, in Palo Pinto county. Three adults and a child in early twentieth-century clothes are obscurely visible in the lower left-center. The view is looking east.
[Twenty Men and One Woman in Front of a Building]
Illustrated here are 20 unidentified men (some in uniform) and 1 unidentified woman standing in front of an unidentified building. Four of the men have removed their hats. The prevalence of uniforms suggests either the military or the police. The high boots worn by two of the men (and the hats that some of the have), the dress of the woman all suggest an early 1930's date for the photograph. The occasion that brought them to that place is not known. The photograph taken by Young's Studio of Mineral Wells, Texas.
[Two Women in Wylie Park]
Two women (one using an umbrella as a parasol) are pictured strolling in Wylie Park. Notes on back of the photograph read: "Corner of N. Oak and N.E. 1st Street, the West side of Wylie Park, a popular place for strolling." North Oak Avenue is in background, with North to the right in the picture. Hazelwood Drugs is on the west side of Oak Ave, opposite the park. Mineral Wells. The streets of Mineral Wells were paved in the summer of 1914. A wagon can be seen traveling north on Oak Avenue. What appears to be a work crew may be seen at the corner indicates that the finishing touches may have been in the process of being applied to the paving as the picture was taken.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 9 of 21: Firemen and a Fire Truck Near the North Side of Budiling]
This photograph shows another view of the early response to the holiday conflagration that consumed the Damron Hotel on December 22, 1975. The Damron was built in 1906, during Mineral Wells' heyday as a popular resort city. Originally named the Colonial Hotel by J. T. Holt, and built for his second wife, the name of the hotel was changed in 1917 when Mr. Holt traded the hotel to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. The hotel was located at 109 W. Hubbard, and the spectacular fire received extensive photographic coverage.
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (first)]
Shown here is a panoramic View of Mineral Wells, Texas taken August 8, 1974. The Baker Hotel and the Crazy Water Hotel are visible. The Convention Center is seen in the far left of the photograph. The view is from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain over north Mineral Wells.
[A View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
A view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain looking west along NW 3rd Street is shown here. Visible landmarks include: The first Crazy Water Hotel, (built in two sections in 1911 and 1912) with its common lobby entrance on NW 3rd Street; the U.S. Post Office in the left foreground; the first Roman Catholic Church on the side of West Mountain at NW 3rd Street; Mineral Wells High School; West Ward School in the gap between West and South Mountains; and the Presbyterian Church on NW 2nd Street, one block northeast of West Ward School.
[A View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
A view from East Mountain, looking down on Mineral Wells and taken about 1910, includes: The First United Methodist Church, the Yeager Building, and the train depot in the background. This photograph was taken before the Baker Hotel was built.
[Dr. J.H. McCracken Home, 2 of 3]
The Dr. J.H. McCracken home built in 1904 at 516 West Hubbard Street. It was restored by Gil Hull. Joseph Hill McCracken was born on a farm near Springtown, Texas, October 1, 1867. He graduated from the University of Tennessee Medical School in 1891, and returned to Texas. On October 15, 1895, he married Marie Sue Wilson, the daughter of Oliver Loving's youngest daughter, Margaret. He was elected President of the Texas Medical Association in 1911, and practiced medicine in Mineral Wells for over fifty years. He frequently laughed about having "delivered babies of babies of babies." Dr. McCracken died in March of 1954, and his wife died in November of 1955. Both are buried in Mineral Wells' Woodland Park Cemetery. Professor John N, McCracken, who established the Mineral Wells College directly across the street west of the McCracken home, is believed to be Dr. McCracken's father. It is presently [2016] the offices of Brown and Ford, attorneys-at-law. [For details of the Mineral Wells College, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School, Texas."]
[First State Bank & Trust]
Shown here is an interior view of the First State Bank & Trust Company, later known as the State National Bank, located at 102 East Hubbard. This bank was organized in 1906, and it opened on April 17, 1906. It became the State National Bank in 1925. The First National Bank was merged with the State National Bank in 1931. The official name of the institution became First National Bank in 1955. At the desk is H. N. Frost, then president. Standing is W. I. Smith, Vice-President & cashier. The teller is unidentified. The photograph was taken 1921. Note the cuspidors in each corner. It is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 147.
[First Country Club]
Illustrated here is a picture of the first Mineral Wells Golf country club, taken about 1950. The picture shows it on the shore of a lake that was located about three miles east of Mineral Wells. Further information is,sadly,lacking.
[The Murphy Family]
A scene of children sitting in horse-drawn carriage, with a man leaning against the carriage house is illustrated here. A family home is shown in the background, with chickens, and a cow in the foreground. Information on back of photograph states "Looking west. Back of Murphy Home on East Mountain." Murphy was a builder in Mineral Wells with the firm of Goodrum, Murphy and Croft, Contractors. They built many of the buildings in the early part of the 1900's, including Mineral Wells High School (1915), Bimini Bath House, and the Norwood Hospital.