Boyce Ditto Public Library - 380 Matching Results

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[Photograph of L. J. Varnell, Jr., Mayor of Mineral Wells]

Description: Photograph of L. J. Varnell, Jr., Mayor of Mineral Wells. Mr. Varnell is wearing a dark suit and tie and standing or sitting against a light backdrop. On the back of the photograph are a stamp giving the Boyce-Ditto Public Library address and handwritten notes, including one that identifies the photo's subject, and a stamp with the photographer's information.
Date: unknown
Creator: Weaver, A. F.

[612 N. W. 6th Street]

Description: This house is currently [2007] owned and occupied by Gil Hulls. An earlier photograph is pictured on page 140 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. The house was built in 1905 by W. S. McCutcheon. The style is tentatively thought to be neo-classic. The two-story porch is unusual. The house shows evidence of much remodeling. The local parish of the Episcopal Church held meetings in the basement that members lovingly called "the Catacombs." St. Luke's Episcopal Church is located next door on a lot donated by the McCutcheons. For more details on the Episcopal Church, and its use of his building, please see William Gross Jr's book "Mineral Wells History--A Sampler."
Date: unknown

[Three Women and a Man In Front of a Car]

Description: Three unknown women and a man are shown standing in front of a large automobile. The man sports a celluloid collar & a straw hat. One lady carries what appears to be a reticule, another an umbrella. Benches are visible behind them all. The date of the picture is also unknown, but the early 1920's is conjectured.
Date: unknown

[The Zappe Home -- NW 4th Avenue]

Description: Trees in full foliage (the photograph was taken in July of 1975) obscure the Zappe House on NW 4th Avenue. This Tudor-style home with a native sandstone porch was originally built in 1929 by Mr. R.S. (Bob) Dalton, a pioneer rancher and developer of the Dalton oilfield in north Palo Pinto County. Dr. H. Arthur Zappe, a local dentist, member of the Texas State Board of Dental Examiners, and former mayor of Mineral Wells, bought the house in 1947. The house is currently [2009] owned by David Adams. There are arched entrances throughout the house, leaded and stained-glass windows, French doors, stippled stucco walls and doors that are inlaid with mahogany panels. In addition to fireplaces, the house obtains heat from gas-fired steam radiators.
Date: July 1975

The Thatch

Description: This photograph presents a conundrum. The building itself appears to be an eclectic mixture of Gothic Revival and Queen Anne (Spindle work subclass) styles. Advertising copy from around the picture relates that The Thatch was operated by Mrs. W. G. Wright. The building was said to be located "Within one block of the famous Gibson and Sangcura pavilions" (the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue and the 800 block of NW 2nd Avenue, respectively). Polk's Directory for 1909 fails to record The Thatch, or Mrs. Wright, as also fail the directories for 1920, 1924, and 1927. No mention of the Thatch appears in A.F. Weaver's "Time was in Mineral Wells...." The unpaved roads in front of the hotel suggest that the picture was taken before 1914. Copy around the picture (not visible here) remark that the building was "Erected two years ago", but no firm date may be deduced from that information.
Date: unknown

[The Thompson House, at 215 NE 2nd Street]

Description: Shown here is a photograph of the front of the Thompson House (later the "Cunningham House"), a two-story, Queen Anne-style home located at 215 NE 2nd Street in Mineral Wells, Texas, just north of the Baker Hotel. Architectural elements include decorative woodwork around the eaves in the gable ends and across the front porch, and cutaway bays on the left of the photograph. A truncated tower serves in place of the full tower that is characteristic of Queen Anne styles.
Date: February 1974
Location Info:

[Unloading Grain From Box Cars]

Description: This picture depicts men unloading grain from box cars at the Mineral Wells railroad yards into horse-drawn wagons. During the days if the Great Depression years of the 1930's, grain and cotton were the principal cash crops of farmers around Mineral Wells, and the WMW&NW (Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwest) Railroad was a prime shipper of the crops to market. This photograph is featured on page 92 of A.F. Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells," second edition.
Date: unknown

[The Tygrett House]

Description: The Tygrett Hotel, built as a Room-and-Board Hotel about 1910, is still [2008] located at 415 NW 4th Street. The house is named "Silk Stocking Row" at this time [2008], and is currently Mineral Wells' only Bed and Breakfast Inn. The house is Queen Anne style, free classic sub-type. Note the unusual two-story wrap-around porch and the the polygonal tower. The Palladian windows and classic columns are characteristic of this sub-type. A. F. Weaver reminisces that he learned how to play the piano at this house. This photograph appears on page 105 of the "Time Was"..., Second Edition.
Date: unknown

[D. W. Griffith]

Description: D. W. Griffith is shown standing on the roof of the new Crazy Hotel, which opened in 1927; and replaced the First Crazy Hotel, which had burned in 1925. Mr. Griffith, who produced silent movies including the "Keystone Kops" comedies, and the classic film "Birth of a Nation", was a guest at the Crazy Hotel while visiting Mineral Wells in 1929. A commemorative postage stamp was issued in his honor on May 27, 1975. Local folklore has it that Mr. Griffith was impressed by the "WELCOME" sign on East Mountain (the world's largest non-commercial, electrically-lighted sign at the time). He developed the "HOLLYWOOD HILLS" addition with other partners when he returned to California, and he erected what is probably the most recognizable landmark in America: The HOLLYWOOD sign now graces Los Angeles. Both signs have survived similar difficult times in their histories. This picture appears on page 19 of A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", second edition, 1974.
Date: 1929

[A View of NE 1st Avenue]

Description: In this view of NE 1st Avenue, the Old Post Office Building is shown at the end of the street and at the left of the picture. It is now [2007] The Woman's Club. The Baker Hotel (apparently under construction) can be seen at the far right of the picture. The Southwestern Bell Telephone Company building in the center of the picture sits across NE 1st Street, and to the north of the Baker.
Date: 1965?

[A Guest Room in the Baker Hotel]

Description: This photograph shows a guest room in the Baker Hotel, when it was operating. Please note the corner sofa, shag carpet, round coffee-table. Please note also the smoking stand at one end of the sofa--an amenity not encountered in modern hotel rooms. The decor suggests the late 1950's or the early 1960's. It is said that the door of the room had an apparatus in it that automatically turned off the lights and the fan when the key was turned in it. The method used has not yet [2016] been fathomed. "Smart" keys (and computers that took their advice) were still in the future, but it was within the technology of the period to accomplish such wonders as rooms that automatically came to life hen the door was opened.. It is conjectured that a mercury switch in the door accomplished the feat.
Date: unknown

[Baker Hotel Grounds' View]

Description: Here is a view of Baker Hotel from across its grounds. The style of the hotel is Spanish Colonial Revival, which William Gross, Jr. states in his book "Mineral Wells History: A Sampler" was a favorite of Mr. T. B.Baker. Note: There are umbrellas around swimming pool, but the swimming pool itself is out of view. Foliage includes Canna flowers and cedar trees. An unidentified woman and child are in foreground. The Baker Hotel had an ill-starred opening, as it occurred only weeks after the infamous stock market crash of 1929. The marketing of Crazy Crystals had been blamed for the distress, because fewer people needed to make the trek to Mineral Wells for the waters. They could produce the same thing in their own homes. However, no proof of that assertion has been found, and the general malaise of the Great Depression probably should be blamed. The owners of the Baker Hotel filed for bankruptcy In 1932. On April 30, 1963, Earl Baker formally closed the hotel. The property went under the hammer that August. The rest is history.
Date: unknown

[The Baker Hotel at Night]

Description: This picture shows the Baker--in its great days--at night. According to William O. Gross, Jr. ("Mineral wells, Texas: A Sampler, 1997) the hotel is properly named "Hotel Mineral Wells", the name "Baker" refers to the Baker Hotel Corporation of San Antonio, Texas, which operated nine hotels at the time. Legend has it that a female guest jumped to her death. Her ghost is supposed to be resident in the building, but substantial evidence for the existence of the ghost remains to this date [2014] lacking. A legend on the front of the photograph states that it was colorized by A. F. Weaver in 1940.
Date: 1940

[The Baker Hotel Roof Garden]

Description: This photograph is identified as "Baker Hotel Roof Garden February 1999." Two chandeliers are still in place on the ceiling, but the missing floor boards, the peeling paint, and the deserted condition of the room are indicative of the sad condition of a once beautiful ballroom. A ballroom on the twelfth floor was titled "The Cloud Room" by virtue of the clouds painted on its ceiling. A picture of it has yet [2014] to be found.
Date: 1999

[A Baseball Team]

Description: This picture shows a men's baseball team in Mineral Wells, but the identification of both the team and the men are unknown. Ike Zablosky (sometimes spelled Zabronski), a Russian immigrant, arrived in America in 1906. He entered the fur-trading business in Mineral Wells, and is credited with naming the Possum Kingdom area when a customer inquired about some premium pelts. Zablosky replied that he had none at the time, but "When my boys return from the possum kingdom, I'm sure they will have some." Zablosky operated a class C professional league baseball team (the Resorters) in Mineral Wells. He became owner of the first professional baseball team in Dallas, later in life. The Chicago White Sox (J. C. McClure was their official photographer) are known to have held their Spring Training camp in Mineral Wells in 1911, and again during a three-year stretch of 1916, 1917, and 1918. It has not been established whether the players shown in this picture represent the Resorters or the White Sox teams. The man in the background, apparently in a World War I uniform, is shown holding an instrument (probably a bugle) whose function has not been determined.
Date: unknown

[The Chautauqua Hall]

Description: This picture shows a side view of the Chautauqua Hall, once located on the side of Welcome Mountain, where the Jaycee Youth Center is now [2010] located (behind the Grand Theater.) It was taken, perhaps,in late spring or early summer--possibly in the morning. The photograph is featured in "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." on page 50. The building departed existence in 1912, after only about seven years of service. The Chautauqua movement began in 1874 in an eponymous town in New York (it is still there). It was conceived as a form of adult education, which featured a set of touring lectures. Before the advent of moving pictures and the radio, Chautauqua was immensely popular. For example, William Jennings Bryan (he of the famous "Cross of Gold" speech)--and other people--gave various lectures and orations at this Chautauqua hall. H.L. Mencken ("Prejudices:First Series", published in 1919) speaks disparagingly of "...oafish, witless buffoonishness [sic] of the chautauquas [sic] and the floor of Congress...." Mr. Mencken, though, had a reputation for disparaging everything (that was American) in his sight. This remark seems to be his only direct comment on the movement. He makes reference to Chautauqua only tangentially otherwise. One might surmise, therefore, that television (which supplanted Chautauqua) followed a parallel route in its later years.
Date: unknown

[A Building Being Demolished]

Description: This building, once the second Post Office, had stood at the corner of 201 SE 1st Avenue and Hubbard Street. This building (as the photograph shows) was subsequently demolished. A Piggly Wiggly grocery store was located on its site. As of March 2, 2009, the place was occupied by the Dollar General Store. This picture may be found in A.F. Weaver's "Time Once was in Mineral Wells" on page 149
Date: unknown

[A Buffet Table]

Description: A buffet table, presumably in the Baker Hotel, is shown ready for guests (who are absent) to use it. Its opulence would reflect the quality of the hotel. The fact that the photograph is in color suggests that it was taken in the late twentieth century. The exact location of this buffet table is [2014] unknown. An ice sculpture of a sleigh and reindeer suggests a Christmas occasion. Further details are lacking.
Date: unknown

[The Damron Hotel Fire, 9 of 21: Firemen and a Fire Truck Near the North Side of Budiling]

Description: This photograph shows another view of the early response to the holiday conflagration that consumed the Damron Hotel on December 22, 1975. The Damron was built in 1906, during Mineral Wells' heyday as a popular resort city. Originally named the Colonial Hotel by J. T. Holt, and built for his second wife, the name of the hotel was changed in 1917 when Mr. Holt traded the hotel to Agnew and Bessie Damron. The hotel was located at 109 W. Hubbard, and the spectacular fire received extensive photographic coverage.
Date: December 22, 1975

[The Damron Hotel Fire, 4 of 21, Fire Inside the Structure]

Description: This is another view of the spectacular fire that consumed the Damron Hotel on December 22, 1975. The hotel was built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife. The name was changed in 1917 when the hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron . The fire received extensive photographic coverage. Note the height of the flames in this picture, taken in the later stages of the fire.
Date: December 22, 1976

[The Damron Hotel Fire, 5 of 21: View from the Rear of the Building]

Description: The Damron Hotel was built in 1906 as the Colonial Hotel by J. T. Holt. At one time, both Kiwanis and the Rotary service Clubs met in the dining room that was located on the west side of the main floor. Formerly located at 109 W. Hubbard Street, the hotel burned completely on December 22, 1975 in a spectacular fire that was extensively photographed. Shown here is one of many views of the fire.
Date: December 22, 1975

[The Damron Hotel Fire, 6 of 21: Bystanders Observing the Fire]

Description: The Damron Hotel was destroyed (on December 22, 1975) in a spectacular fire that received extensive photographic coverage. The hotel was located at 109 W. Hubbard. This is another picture of that immense conflagration. All the firemen answered a call that came in at 9:08 on the morning of the fire. The City of Weatherford also sent men and equipment over to help. Volunteers who were not themselves firemen also helped. Other buildings that suffered damage were Pemberton's (an appliance store across the street and west of the hotel), and the hardware store (Bought by Bob Sturtivant) next to the hotel. Note the height of the flames in this picture taken in the later stages of the fire.
Date: December 22, 1975

[The Damron Hotel Fire, 13 of 21: Christmas Decorations on Light Poles]

Description: The Damron Hotel (which was built in 1906 during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort city) burned completely on December 22, 1975. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard Street. By 11:30 (some two hours after the fire started), the Davidson Hardware company, next door, was engulfed in flames. George's Man's Shop and Hill's style Shop were also damaged.
Date: unknown