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[An Early Car at the Crazy Well Flats]
Frank Richards (The driver, identified as "Dad") sits in a Thomas Flyer, parked at the Crazy Pavilion, in late October (or early November) of 1909. Dust on the car, extra spare tires, and a sign on the spares, indicate they have been involved in a "Pathfinder Endurance" run (from Fort Worth to San Angelo) for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. The driver and passenger are dressed in typical "duster" clothing for cross-country travel. Frank Richards went on to maintain a successful Abstract company in Mineral Wells. His father, Thomas Richards, had the Star Wells Company in Mineral Wells. A cigar sign in the window suggests this was the drug store, then located in the southeast corner of the Crazy Flats. A sign on the hotel also advertises rooms for rent in addition to its being a mineral water drinking pavilion.
DUPLICATE OF The Bimini Bath House, Mineral Wells, Texas
A photograph of an old postal card showing the Bimini Mineral Bath House, later known as "The Wagley Building." It was constructed by Goodrum, Murphy, and Croft and located at 114 NW 4th Street. A vintage automobile is shown at right side of the picture. This building was demolished before 2008.
[Pediment on the Second Building of the First Presbyterian Church]
This photograph shows the pediment of the south-west entrance to the First Presbyterian Church (This is its third building) at 300 NW 4th Avenue. The acanthus ornaments on top of the pediment (in Classical times, a guard against dripping rain), have no real function. The dentils that line the interior of the pediment are not Classical, nor are the capitals of of the pillars.
[Hubbard Street/Crazy Sign]
This picture affords a view of Hubbard Street, in Mineral Wells, Texas,looking east. Please note the sign above street, "Welcome to Mineral Wells, Home of Crazy." The sign was torn down on December 24, 1958, to the general consternation of the public.
[Taken From North Oak]
This information is printed on the back of photograph: "Taken from the North Oak and N. E. 3rd. Street looking North May 28, 1975 by A.F. Weaver." Businesses that are visible in the photograph are, in order: The Crazy Water Hotel, Community Aerial Cable Company, Bennett's Office Supply and The Grand Theater.
Woodmen of the World Camp Meeting , June 19, 1947
A white-ink legend on the face of this photograph reads: Woodman [sic] of the World Camp Meeting----6-19-47 Mineral Wells, Texas. phillips [sic] photographic [sic] Service [sic] A typed legend on the back of the photograph reads: WOW MEETING 6-19-47 held in Convention Hall. Recognized Front [sic] row from left: #1 Ezra Wortham. #5 Charlie Sheridan, #6 George Oliver 3rd. Row standing #1 John Birdwell, #5 Louis Fryer, #6 John Miller, #7 Ben Yeager, #12 Bill Teichman. 4th row: #1 Charlie Langley #15 Roy Langley [Unreadable deletions in green ink above appear this caption] This picture appears in Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" on page 165.
[The Welcome Sign]
The WELCOME Sign (shown here) was built in 1922 by George Holmgren, the Texas Rotary Club's Governor,in his San Antonio iron works following the State Rotary Club's Convention in Mineral Wells. He gave the sign to the people of Mineral Wells with the understanding that they would maintain what was, at the time, the world's largest non-commercial lighted sign. The original incandescent bulbs were later replaced with lower-maintenance red neon lights by the Mineral Wells Jaycees. A Warrant Officer Company from Fort Wolters moved the sign from its original site on East Mountain to the east side of Bald Mountain (now called Welcome Mountain), overlooking Elmwood Cemetery, in 1972. It remains there today [2008], lighted at its base with flood lights, to greet visitors coming from the east. This is a picture, taken in 1972, of the restored sign.
[Walker's Grocery and Market]
Shown here is the J.J. Walker Grocery & Market, once located at 614 Southeast 6th Avenue. The picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 176. The identities of the three people pictured is not known at this [2015] time. Note, however, the hand-operated gasoline pumps, the oil pumps in the background, and a sign that advertises Texaco gasoline at 18 cents per gallon!
Mineral Wells Sanitorium
An early edition of the Mineral wells "Index" states that two doctors have leased this building, but further details are not as yet [2014] forthcoming.
Street Parade / West Texas C. of C. Convention / Mineral Wells 1925
A parade on North Oak Avenue in Mineral Wells, Texas is the subject of this picture. Businesses partaking of it include Poston Dry Goods, a bath house, the Hexagon Hotel, Palace Drugs, American Cafe, and the Caldwell Hotel. American flags, Texas flags, and various banners are hanging from the buildings. The parade is moving south (while the picture is looking north) on N. Oak Avenue, at its intersection with SE 1st Street It was held during the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention of 1925. The photograph bears the colophon of the Basil Clemens Photo Company of Breckenridge, Texas.
Standard Park
The Standard Park not only had a swimming pool, but a movie theater and dancing pavilion, as well, for the entertainment of health-seekers. A trolley to it operated at 600 North Oak Street from 1907 to 1913. (Note the Kingsley Hotel above and left of the Standard, built into the side of East Mountain--later destroyed by fire.) First known as the Vichy Well and Natatorium, then later as the Beach, the Standard was torn down in World War II; and a USO Club was built here for soldiers at Camp Wolters. The USO building was given to the city after the war, and renamed the North Oak Community Center. The Crazy Water Festival Committee is currently [2003] attempting to restore the Community Center.
Sewing Room
The back of the photograph exhibits a note that this picture was copied from the "Burro", which is the Mineral Wells High School yearbook. The "Sewing Room" was a classroom in the Lillian Peek Home Economics building on the grounds of the high school. The Lillian Peek cottage was built by the WPA in 1937, and was the first free- standing house built specifically for Home Economics education in the State of Texas. It was "Current state of the art" when it was completed. The building now [2008] houses the Creative Arts Center, and is used by the local Art Club as an art workshop and museum.
[A Street Scene, Taken About the 1930's]
This photograph illustrates the "New" Crazy Hotel on North Oak Avenue, which opened in 1927 after the earlier hotel burned March 15, 1925. Many automobiles typical of the period can be seen on the street. Note the following businesses: The Tom Moore Drug Company, a barber shop, a cafe, Young's Studio, a bath house, and the Crazy Drug.
Star House
The Star House was built about 1900,and owned by Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Ramsey. This 34-room hotel was situated at 315 Coke Street. A colophon at the bottom of the picture, barely legible, reads: "1903 Ramsey House Mineral Wells, Texas John Ramsey Ima Ramsey." This picture differs from the last one only insofar as the porch seems to have been extended across the front of the building. This photograph appears on page 105 of "Time Was in Mineral Wells", Second Edition.
Texas Carlsbad Well [ 2 of 3: People on Porch]
An early picture (probably taken from a newspaper) of the Texas Carlsbad Drinking Pavilion, located at 415 NW 1st Avenue. It stood across the street west of the Crazy Well and its first Crazy Drinking Pavilion. The large, two story Second Crazy Pavilion, built adjacent, and to the south of the first one, faced west toward the Carlsbad. The Carlsbad had been replaced by a brick structure by 1909. Stained glass windows were later added to the building that depicted Ponce de Leon and his "Fountain of Youth" mineral water that "Makes a man love HIS wife. "Makes a wife love HER husband, "Robs the divorce court of its business, "Takes the temper out of red-headed people, "Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." (Please see the picture one down, but one, for a better view of it.) This is the second picture of this image. The first one has been cropped, and does not show the outer parts of the picture. The third one is a slightly clearer picture. A colophon on the lower left corner reads: "Evans Photo Min Wells Tex"
[Three Women and a Man In Front of a Car]
Three unknown women and a man are shown standing in front of a large automobile. The man sports a celluloid collar & a straw hat. One lady carries a reticule, another an umbrella. Benches are visible behind them all. The date of the picture is also unknown, but the early 'twenties of the twentieth century is conjectured.
[A Rock Outcrop on Mineral Wells "Mountain"]
A rock outcrop, and vegetation typical of the hills (local custom calls them "Mountains") in Mineral Wells. Some of the houses of the town can be seen through the bushes. This photograph is one of 17 negatives that were in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography and postmarked Aug. 4, 1975. Some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)" were also on the envelope.
The Hexagon Hotel [With History]
Construction of the Hexagon Hotel was started in 1895 and completed in 1897. It was constructed of long-leaf yellow pine; the exterior was cypress siding, and the roof was covered with hand-split cypress shingles. The interior was of "Heart of Pine" wood. All the stone work was done by two English stone-masons. The building was constructed with pegs and square nails. The four staircases inside spiraled down through the five floors. The lobby floor was covered with hexagon-shaped tan, brown and blue tiles. The rooms were hexagon-shaped with a bath between every two rooms. The hotel was torn down for the materials in the building in September 1959. (This information is found on page 106 "Time Was in Mineral Wells" by A.F. Weaver) The "Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.)" remarks (in 1966) that "Rates in season were $1.50 per day; out of season, $1.00 per day, which included bath privileges. Meals were available at nearby hotels." The "Star" goes on to relate that the Hexagon Hotel was converted into apartments at some time prior to its utter demolition, but it does not say exactly when this conversion was made.
[ A Street Scene]
This picture comes from one of 17 (4X4) negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), postmarked Aug. 4, 1975, and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. Also on the envelope, are some telephone numbers and "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield.) The scene is believed to show some of the large homes on the east slope of West Mountain, in the 600 block of NW 6th Street, taken at about the time of their construction. The home in the foreground appears to be the site of the former Episcopal Parsonage (the church adjoins the parsonage to the north (left of the picture).
Kitchens & Mess Halls, Camp Wolters
A legend on the bottom of the photograph clearly reads: Left: Top, Entrance to Camp Wolters. Bottom, Kitchens and Mess Halls, Camp Wolters." It shows seven rock-faced buildings with a curb in front of them. Ash cans, and trash repositories--also rock-faced--are visible on left. Five men--unidentified--stand around. The date of the photograph has not been preserved, but Camp Wolters was the World War I and World War II predecessor of what was changed to Fort Wolters during the Vietnam Era.
[A View of the Baker Hotel]
Shown here is yet another view of the Baker Hotel in its days of glory.
[A View of Mineral Wells]
A set of buildings is shown here. The only buildings that have been identified with confidence are the Crazy Water Hotel, and the Nazareth Hospital, both at the right. The Baker occupies a small position on the extreme right.
[The Convention Hall and its Surroundings]
Shown here is the back side of the convention hall. The picture antedates its demolition. The surrounding buildings have not yet [2014] been identified.
[A View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
A view of Mineral Wells and South Mountain, taken from atop East Mountain is shown here. Notable buildings are the West Ward School next to the "Little Rock" school house in upper right and Poston Dry Goods in left-center. The photograph was taken before the second high school was built in 1914.
[Inspiration Point]
The label on the photograph reads both "Possum Kingdom Dam" and "Inspiration Point". A. F. and Patsy Weaver are shown enjoying the view from Inspiration Point. A.F. Weaver himself took the photograph, using a tripod and camera timer,in the same vicinity where he had proposed to Patsy Weaver years before this photograph was taken. In the early part of the twentieth century,the internationally known evangelist, Billy Sunday, visited Mineral Wells. He was told about an outstanding view from a vantage point south of town. On seeing the vista for himself,the Rev. Sunday remarked it was truly an inspirational view. Since that time the viewpoint has been known as "Inspiration Point". This vista is seven miles south of Mineral Wells off US Highway 281, and approximately 40 miles below the Morris Sheppard Dam at Possum Kingdom Lake. It has been called one of the most beautiful scenic views in Texas. This picture has possibly been used in the course of the advertising of interesting things to see and do around Mineral Wells, which might explain the label attached to the photograph. Similarly captivating is a view from "Observation Point" the Dam at Possum Kingdom Lake. The two vistas, some 20 to 30 miles apart,overlook entirely different stretches of the Brazos, each with its own unique but spectacular view.
[Lake Mineral Wells, 1 of 4, Flood Stage]
Lake Mineral Wells, Mineral Wells State Park, is shown here in flood stage. Heavy spring rains dumped 7.2 inches of rainfall into the area over a violent week-end in March 1976, resulting in a flood that claimed 24 lives in fire- and water-related incidents. The dam is visible on the far left side of the picture, with water flowing over it. Flood waters cover a large part of the land between the photographer and the dam. The public boat ramp and fueling station are on the peninsula at the far right side of the picture. The picture is part of a group of films labeled "1977", but related news articles give the date as March of the previous year.
[Lake Mineral Wells, 2 of 4]
The dam of Lake Mineral Wells is shown here during a flood, March 1976. A large area of Palo Pinto and Parker counties received heavy rains (up to 7.2 inches in places) during a three-day period. The road directly below the dam was entirely under water, and the effect of water flowing over the road is barely visible. Heavy damage was also reported over a substantial part of the City of Mineral Wells as a result of the downpour.
[Lake Mineral Wells, 3 of 4: Sign]
A sign in front of the spillway (which was part of the dam for Mineral Wells Lake before it was rebuilt to a higher level during World War Two) says, "Water For Texans."
Famous Mineral Water
The Famous Water Company, founded by Ed Dismuke (still located at 215 NW 6th Street) has been restored, and still [2007] sells mineral water. The large concrete bottle depicts the original shape of the container of the product sold. Dismuke also established a plant on the east bank of Lake Pinto, west of Mineral Wells, to manufacture his "PRONTO-LAX" Crystals. He organized the Mineral Wells Lakewood Scenic Railway in partnership with local banker Cicero Smith, whose gasoline-powered "Dinky Cars" operated quarter-hourly between Lake Pinto and Mineral Wells from 1905 to 1909. The Famous Water Company currently sells three grades of water: Regular, full-strength mineral water; deep (400 ft.) well water; and deep-well water that has been ionized and filtered by reverse osmosis.
[Fred Estrada, Street Vendor]
Photograph of Fred Estrada posing next to a wheeled card that says "hot tamales." A street is visible behind him, including a number of storefronts and parked cars. A mail box is visible in the foreground on the right side of the image.
Crazy Paper Box Company
The Crazy Water Company built a plant in 1919 to extract minerals from its water, box the crystals, and sell them nationwide as Crazy Water Crystals. Part of the crystal enterprise included a box factory. Following an action by the Food and Drug Administration in the late 1930's, crystal operations were reduced and the box operation was diversified. A Mr. Breidling bought the machinery to construct boxes in 1940. He remained with the factory when it was sold to Pollock (A subsidiary of Regis). They added 22000 square feet to the plant, over and above the 56000 square feet already in existence.. They introduced two new machines into the plant, and got rid of the old ones. The plant continues (2016) to produced boxes for Christmas presents. Rumor has it (2016) that the Crazy Water industry plans to re-open the plant to produced Crazy Crystals again. "'Treetop' Erwin, left, was the driver of the Crazy Box Company truck" is written on the back of the photograph. The photograph is dated 1940, and can be found in A. F. Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition, 1974, on page 28. Special note: By magnifying the picture so as to be able to read the license plate of the truck, the date "42" becomes visible.
[A Farm House]
Photograph of a farmhouse in Palo Pinto County (possibly near Thurber), visible at the end of a round driveway of red soil. The house is two stories tall and has a long row of dormer windows above a full-length front porch. Several vehicles are parked in front of the home. On the right side of the image, a white fence marks the boundary of the yard and hills covered in scrub are visible on the other side.
[Mineral Wells High School]
This view of Mineral Wells High School, taken from the east in 1940, shows the 1884 "Little Rock School House" (Mineral Wells' first public school) on the north side of the high school. The larger school was built at 101 NW 5th Avenue in 1915. The second high school in Mineral Wells, it still [2008] stands. Three other high schools have been built since the last class graduated from this one in 1955.
[Mineral Wells High School]
This photograph was taken at the completion of Mineral Wells High School in 1915. The Mineral Wells Independent School District donated the building to the Fifty Year Club in 2007.
[Poston's Dry Goods, 13 of 15: Inside Cashier Station]
Photograph of Will Poston standing behind a desk in Poston Dry Goods and reaching up to the handle of a pulley that was part of a messenger system in the store. Part of the store is visible behind him, including boxes stacked on shelves and clothing laid out on tables.
[Partial Minutes: Mineral Wells Bicentennial Committee, November 18, 1975]
First page of the minutes of the Mineral Wells Bicentennial Committee, held in the old Nazareth Hospital in 1975. It includes a list of attendees and a summary of some of the discussion points.
A Hazy View of Mineral Wells
Photograph of the city of Mineral Wells, Texas, taken from a hill looking down at the buildings.
[The Hexagon Hotel]
The Hexagon Hotel at 701 N. Oak Avenue, opened in December 1897. The brick building to the right was the Convention Hall (built in 1925 on the foundation of the Hotel's electric plant) for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. The Hexagon Hotel was demolished in 1959, the Convention Center in 1977.
[The Hexagon Hotel]
A picture of the Hexagon Hotel. See also "Hexagon Hotel [with history]." This picture was taken in 1925. Note the construction of the Convention Hall beside the Hexagon Hotel on the right. The Convention Hall was demolished in 1977
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 20 of 21: Different View of the Fire]
Shown here is yet another view of fire at the Damron Hotel, December 22, 1975 is shown here. The hotel was located in the 109 W. Hubbard Street. The fire also destroyed Davidson Hardware, which was in the same building, and damaged Pemberton's ( nearby appliance store) and George's Man's shop a well as damaging the back of Hill's Style Shop.
[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 3 of 3: The East Side of the Construction]
This series of photographs of the construction of Mineral Wells Savings and Loan was taken in 1975. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975, to make room for the Savings and Loan. D.M. Howard was the first of five brothers to arrive from North Carolina. He later sent for his other brothers to establish the Howard Brothers Department Stores complex in the early 1900's. The Baker Hotel, directly across E. Hubbard north of the Savings and Loan, is seen to the left of the picture. Across SE 1st Street, to the south, were the Piggly Wiggly Grocery store (at the site of Mineral Wells' first Post Office) and the S & H Green Stamp store. The First State Bank now [2012] occupies this entire city block.
[The Hexagon Hotel]
A large group of people, most sitting on donkeys, are shown out front of the Hexagon Hotel. Donkeys were used to transport visitors to the top of East Mountain for an overview of the City of Mineral Wells. It appears the party in this picture is preparing for such a trip. The Caldwell family ran the Hexagon Hotel as a boarding house for a while, hence the sign on the second floor of the building. H. L. Milling and his father also ran the hotel for a while, too. The building visible behind the hotel is the DC generating plant that supplied electricity to illuminate the building.
[The Home of Dr. C.F. Yeager at 300 NE 1st Street]
A note on the back of the print states that this home was located at 300 NE 1st Street. This home, of physician Dr. C.F. Yeager, stood next door and east of the Old Methodist Church, which may be seen on the left side of the photograph. Dr. Yeager's drugstore was one block west of his home at the SW corner of of NW 1st Street and NW 2nd Avenue.
Mineral Wells High School
We have here a view from the south of Mineral Wells' High School, built in 1915 at 101 NW 5th Avenue. This side of the building faces W. Hubbard Street. The tower atop the West Ward School can be seen below the skyline, and to the left, above the high school. (The West Ward school was torn down in 1930.)
[Men and a Woman Around a Microphone]
Five men and a lady are pictured congregating around a microphone. The word "Gulf" is seen obscurely on it. An alert-looking boy in the background holds a musical instrument, as does one of the men. A man in striped pants talks into the microphone. The occasion is entirely unknown.
[A party at the Wann home]
A photograph of a news article describing a party given by Mrs. Chloe Schillings at her home, located on NW 2nd Street and 4th Avenue--across the street and west of the Presbyterian Church--is shown here. The party included Mrs. M. R. Birdwell, Mrs. S. A. Prostridge, Mrs. B. R. Beeler, Mrs. R. L. Yeager, Mrs. Elizabeth Cushman, Mrs. J. E. Johnson, Mrs. Gus Wicklund, Mrs. Millie Turner, Mrs. Mitchell, Mrs. Thomas, Mrs. Mae B. Tiliord, Mrs. E. W. Rogers, Mrs, Vera Lang, Mrs. Ed Oliver, Mrs. F. C. Highsmith and Mrs. Chloe Wann Schillings At the time of the news article, the home, a large Queen Anne-style house, was said to be owned by Mrs. S. H. Smith.
[NE 1st Avenue]
This photograph shows a scene of NE 1st Avenue. The stone building on the left is the "Yeager Building", which once housed the "Lion" Drugstore. At the time of the photograph, it housed Baker Medical Supply. A handwritten date on the back of the photograph states "1993." In 2007, the coffee shop "H2Jo" is located in this building. The next building up the street (and in the next block) was once the Hub Tailors, and the large three-story building farther up the street is the Western Auto Store. At the end of the street is the Old Post Office, which currently [2008] houses the Women's Club.
[A Parade in Mineral Wells on North Oak Avenue]
The Chamber of Commerce float, with the Parade Princess, greets visitors in the 1936 Centennial Parade in Mineral Wells,Texas. It is shown proceeding along the 200 block of North Oak Avenue. Businesses in photograph include, (bunting-festooned) Perry Brothers 5-10-and 25-cent store, City Bakery, and (to the left) part of Duke & Ayers 5-& 10-cent store. Angle-parked automobiles and spectators line the street.
[The Murphy Home]
A picture taken of the Murphy home, taken about the turn of the twentieth century is shown here. The home underwent several renovations during Mr. Murphy's residency. The family at the time of this photograph consisted of two adults and three children. The home is located on East Mountain, and can be seen from most of North Oak Avenue. It was later known as the Brewer home. Mr. Murphy, a contractor, built many buildings in Mineral Wells, including the Mineral Wells High School and the second First Baptist Church.
[The Old Post Office]
This picture shows what is now [2101] known as "The Old Post Office Building." A horse, dragging a cart, is seen drinking out of a trough in front of it. The trough is now [2010] located in the Mineral Wells Commons park. The whereabouts of horse is unknown. The building now [2010] houses the Women's club. The picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 188.