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ABOUT BROWSE FEED
The Kingsley
The Kingsley was built on the side of East Mountain around NW 7th Street, and was eventually destroyed by fire. The legend "The Kinglsey, Mineral Wells Texa." invites comentary, as "Texa" is not a proper abbreviation for "Texas." This photograph appears on page 102 of A. F. Weaver's pictorial history book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells..." Second Edition, 1988.
[The First Air-Mail Service to Mineral Wells]
The first batch of airmail arrived in Mineral Wells, 1947, 6:30 pm. Individuals from left are: John Chamberlain, Manager of the Chamber of Commerce, Fred Parnell, Bill Cameron, of the Index, Fred Brown, Manager of the Baker Hotel, Mayor John Miller, an unidentified pilot, D.C. Harris, Postmaster (holding the mail bag) and R. T. Jones. The airplane in the background, a Cessna 190, was probably the one used to transport the mail. It appeared to be a cold day, as the officials are all wearing coats. (A negative accompanying this picture depicted a "Christmas rush at the old Post Office")
[Col. and Mrs. W. Riess (W. R.) Austin]
Colonel and Mrs. W. Riess (W. R.) Austin are depicted here, from an image taken from a 1902 photograph. Colonel Austin is mentioned on page 54 of "Time Was..." second edition. A. F. Weaver says, "...the Austin Well, established by Col. W. R. Austin, who came from Kentucky to Palo Pinto County about 1880. Austin settled on Staggs Prairie, where he farmed and ranched. Then he became interested in mineral waters when he had an eye infection that affected his sight. So he moved to Mineral Wells, and the constant use of the waters restored his sight. He engaged in the dairy business, at first; but later entered the mineral water production field, establishing the Austin Well, which was later operated by his son-in-law, Tom Sims."
[Judge J. A. Lynch]
. This picture,of Judge J. A. Lynch (1827-1920), founder of Mineral Wells, Texas, may be found published on page 32 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. It is taken from a painting that is owned by the Lynch family, and executed by Thomas Beauregard. A label at the bottom of the frame cannot be read, but presumably identifies the subject of the painting.
[The Founder of Mineral Wells - Portrait]
This unlabeled photograph appears to be of Judge J. A. Lynch and his third wife, Armanda Sweeny Lynch, possibly at a family reunion. Judge James Alvis Lynch was the founder of Mineral Wells. No identification of the people (numbered) around them appears to survive.
[The Tour of Homes, 1976, (5)]
The Cunningham House (502 NW 23rd Street, Mineral Wells, Texas) was built in the 1930's. It is in Italian Renaissance style, and it shows evidence of later remodeling. It later became the home of E.B. Ritchie, Palo Pinto County Judge from 1904 to 1908. Judge Ritchie was the first of four generations (son George M., grandson John P., great grandson Richard P.) of attorneys and civic Leaders in Palo Pinto County. This negative was part of a collection of photographs take by A. F. Weaver and was found in an envelope marked "Homes, Tour of, 4/76" The following names were listed: "McFall, Brewer, Catrett, John Moore, Hull, McLaughlin."
[Mineral Wells' First Public School]
Mineral Wells' first public school was erected in 1884, and located on what is now [2008] NW 5th Avenue. The building is now used as a museum.
[An Early Bird's-Eye-View of Mineral Wells]
A very early panoramic view of Mineral Wells (taken around 1882) from East Mountain and looking southwest is illustrated here. Locations identified by numbers are: 1: Judge Lynch's cabin, now Lynch Plaza at S. Oak Avenue and E. Hubbard Street; 2: The Mesquite Street well, middle of NE 1st Avenue (the second well in town, now [2008] abandoned); 3:The current center of downtown Mineral Wells, showing the intersection of Oak Avenue (US 281) and Hubbard Street (US Highway 180); 4: The current Fire and Police Departments; 5: S. Oak Avenue; 6: The Southern House Hotel; 7: The present "Business District", NE 1st Avenue; and 8: N. Oak Avenue (a residential area at the time.)
[A Home at 401 N. W. 6th Street]
This photograph is found on page 115 of the "Mini Edition, 'Time Was'..." and on page 140 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. J. S. Murphy (seen on the left) built this home in 1914 for L. E. Seaman (on the right). The style appears to be eclectic, with Prairie and Mission elements. Please note the unusual double porte-cochere and the shaped parapet of the front dormer.
[The Period Hotel and Annex]
The Period Hotel, located at N.W. 4th Avenue and 6th Street, was owned and managed by Miss Lizzie More. The hotel was destroyed by fire, but its annex is still [2007] standing, and is in use as an apartment house. A similar, but earlier, photograph is found on page 103 of A.F. Weaver's pictorial history "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells," Second Edition, 1988.
The Curtis House
The Curtis House was an early hotel at 315 E. Hubbard Street, where the Baker Hotel swimming pool is now [2008] located. This picture was handed down through the Curtis family to Robert Curtis, who donated it to A.F. Weaver June 25, 1996. A later view of the hotel is found on page 101 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells."
Crazy Water Hotel
Shown here is the front entrance of the Crazy Water Hotel, in the 100 block of NW 3rd Street. This entrance is into the hotel lobby with the front desk to the left. The "Crazy Water Crystals" radio show originated from the hotel lobby immediately to patron's right upon entering the hotel. A salesman convinced hotel owner, Hal Collins, that if he would advertise crazy water crystals over that "new-fangled" media, radio, that he could sell a boxcar-load of crystals a week. Radio advertising from the lobby of the hotel over the Texas Quality Network (TQN) made the crystals so popular in the thirties, they were selling a boxcar-load of them each DAY! Just dissolve the crystals in water and the purchaser had, perhaps, the world's first "instant food."
[Time Was, 1st Edition, Auction, 2 of 8, A. F. Weaver]
This picture shows Ed Ford, standing before the picture he had painted of Mineral Wells' First Public School. It was built in 1884, and restored in 1975 by The Mineral Wells Heritage Association as a museum to preserve the history of the city.
[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 2 of 3: A Piggy Wiggly Is in the Background]
The construction of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, at 101 SE 1st Avenue in 1975, was documented in this series of photographs. The Howard Building, the first of the complex of Howard Brothers Department Stores, had been built on this location in the early 1900's. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975, to make room for the Savings and Loan. The Piggly Wiggly Grocery Store (at the site of Mineral Wells' first Post Office) and the Green Stamp Store are visible across SE 1st Avenue, south of the Savings and Loan. The new First State State currently covers the entire city block at this location.
[A Piano Recital, 5 of 10]
This photograph, along with nine others, was taken from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey." Thelma Doss, a local radio personality and historian, is pictured with the pianist in this photograph. The recital was given in the Fellowship Hall of the First Presbyterian church.
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the East, 1967]
A view of the businesses and residences north of East State Highway 180, looking west toward the Baker Hotel in the background. Note the Spanish Trace Apartments and the Brazos Mall.
The Bimini Bath House
A photograph of an old postal card showing the Bimini Mineral Bath House, later known as "The Wagley Building" is shown here. It was constructed by Goodrum, Murphy, and Croft and located at 114 NW 4th Street. It was later demolished.
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
The Rotary Club featured a float during "Time Was" Bicentennial (celebrating the United States Bi-Centennial) parade in downtown Mineral Wells, on April 4, 1976. It is moving south on Oak Avenue at the intersection of Oak and Hubbard Streets. Riders on the float depict "flappers" and a golfer of the "Roaring Twenties", dancing to jazz music.
The Curtis House
The Curtis House was once to be found at 315 E. Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells. This photograph of it is to be found on page 101 of "Time Was..." by A.F. Weaver. Note the steeple of Methodist Episcopal Church at 301 NE 1st Street, at the far right edge of the picture. Built in 1898, the church was expanded in 1903 as the First Methodist church, whose congregation still [2008] occupies this location in a newer church building.
[Bathing Beauties]
Three young women lounge at the "old" Mineral Wells City Pool. The woman on the right was Jill Hickey, Mineral Wells High School graduate of 1966, later Jill Hickey Moore of Stafford, Texas. This photograph, judging by the women's hair-do's, appears to have been taken in the 1960's.
[The Penix Home ]
The Penix Home (at 1001 SW 7th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas)was once owned by William H. Penix--partner of the law firm of Penix, Miller, Perkins, and Dean. He also served as vice-president of the Bank of Mineral Wells in 1920. The style is Queen Anne, Free Classic sub-type. It is shown here much-ravaged by time. Note the decayed "Gingerbread", the cut-away bay (not common in Mineral Wells),and the flat-topped tower, which is unlikely to have been original. The house was re-located in 1989 to an area north of town,now [2008] Bennett Road. Restoration of the house was completed in 1998.
[The Christmas Rush With the First Airmail]
The sorting room of the "old post office" at Christmas time. Airmail had just arrived in Mineral Wells. The caption "1916" is written in the top margin of photograph. Air Mail arrived in Mineral Wells in two distinct eras. The first was from the 1916 date on this photograph to about the beginning of World War II. The mail route of that era was marked by rotating signal beacons for night flight, and low frequency radio directional beams with "A" (dot-dash) and "N" (dash-dot) Morse Code signals to indicate straying, right or left, from the true course between landing fields during flight operations. These deliveries were suspended during World War II, and improved service was resumed for a period of time a few years after the war. At one time during the 1950's-1960's, Trans Texas Airways operated from Shreveport,Louisiana. to El Paso, Texas It made scheduled daily stops in Mineral Wells for both passengers and mail.
[A Parade With a Rotary Club float]
The Rotary Club float in Mineral Wells' 1976 Bi-Centennial Parade featured riders, in clothes typifying the period, that represent a "Roaring Twenties" golfer dancing with "Flapper Fannies."
[The "Old" Post Office]
No Description Available.
[Three Women at a Swimming Pool]
Three women are shown at the "old" Mineral Wells City Pool. A male lifeguard, to their right, looks on unconcernedly. Only one woman can be identified: Jill Hickey, Mineral Wells High School graduate of 1966,the woman on the right, now Jill Hickey Moore of Stafford, Texas.
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
A float, with women dressed in period clothing, appeared in the April 4, 1976 "Time Was" Bicentennial Parade (commemorating the United States Bicentennial). The float commemorates several historical mineral-water drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells, including the Lithia, the Gibson, Lynch's mineral well, the Carlsbad, the Crazy, and the Hawthorne.
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows a celebrity car in the "Time Was" Bicentennial (celebrating the United States Bicentennial) parade, held April 4, 1976. The passengers riding in the back seat of the 1976 Cadillac El Dorado convertible are The Mayor of Mineral Wells, Ellis White, and his wife, Janie. The picture was taken at the intersection of Oak Street (Highway 281) and Hubbard Avenue (Highway 180) in downtown Mineral Wells. The car is moving south on Oak Street, with the Baker Hotel one block east in background. The camera that took the picture is facing east-northeast.
[A House at 1004 SW 10th Street]
A picture of the home at 1004 SW 10th Street, Mineral Wells, Texas is shown here. The picture does not afford a sufficiently good view to determine its style, but Neoclassical elements are evident. A 1940 telephone book lists it as the address of one Alvin Maddox.
[A House at 1004 SW 10th Street]
This photograph affords a wider view of the house shown in the previous picture. It is of eclectic style, with Prairie, and Neoclassical elements. A telephone book dated 1940 lists it as the address of Alvin Maddox.
[The Ray Hamilton Home - 1016 SW 7th Avenue]
The Ray Hamilton Home at 1016 SW 7th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. The style is Queen Anne, free classic. Please note the inset arches and the Palladian windows. The style was popular around the turn of the twentieth century. The house shows very slight evidence of remodeling.
[The Mineral Wells High School Band in the Bicentennial Parade]
The Mineral Wells High School Band in the "Time Was" Bicentennial Parade of 1976 (celebrating the United States Bicentennial) is shown here, as taken from a perspective looking northeast at intersection of N. Oak Avenue (Highway 281 left to right) and E. Hubbard Street (Highway 180, one-way right to left.)
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
A float, depicting the Rock School House in the "Time Was" featured in Bicentennial parade (celebrating the United States Bicentennial). Built in 1884, it was Mineral Wells' first public school. The float is shown at the corner of Hubbard and North Oak Streets. It was sponsored by the Junior History Club. A sign on the building in the background identifies the Proctor Schneider Insurance Agency. This site was formerly occupied by the First National Bank. The Baker Hotel is in left background.
[The Old Matt Skeen Home - 516 NE 4th Avenue]
This is a picture of old Matt Skeen Home at 516 NE 4th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. The porch, the face of the gable, and the differing roof lines all suggest later remodeling. Note the unusual candle-snuffer roof of the unusually-placed tower. The picture was taken June of 1974.
[Parade at Highways 180 and 281 in Mineral Wells]
The bi-centennial parade, 1976 is shown here in progress. A covered wagon, horses, riders, and parade float are visible in the background. The view is taken from the corner of westbound Hubbard Street, (US Highway 180) at Oak Avenue, (US Highway 281.)
[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]
The Mineral Wells Heritage Association sponsored a float in the April 4, 1976 "Time Was" Bicentennial Parade (celebrating the United States Bicentennial). The float commemorates both the publishing of A. F. Weaver's photographic history, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...", which was published co-incident with the conversion of the "Little Rock Schoolhouse" into a museum, and restoration of the building itself. The ninety-member Mineral Wells Heritage Association was formed to preserve Mineral Wells' first (1884) public school. Mr. Weaver was a director and Charter Member of the Heritage Association, and served as its first President. He was also chairman of the Palo Pinto County Bi-centennial Committee. The parade is pictured going south on Oak Avenue (US Highway 281) at the corner of Hubbard Street (US Highway 180). Jeep's "The Thing" automobile is pulling the float.
The Cullen Grimes School
Principal Donald Bond, the teachers and the students of the afternoon group at Cullen Grimes School in Mineral Wells, Texas congregate in front of the building in March of 1954.
[A Group Picture]
A picture of a large group of attendees at the Mineral Wells Annual Fair is shown. The picture was taken in the early 1900's at the Dance Pavilion at Elmhurst Park.
[The Mineral Wells High School Concert Band]
This picture, showing the concert band of the Mineral Wells High School Marching Band (standing on the steps of the school) was taken around 1922. James Walker Calvert is on the top row at the far right. Mr. Brunswick, the bandleader, is on the front row at the far left. Ellis White is the trombone player on the left. See also "Mineral Wells High School Marching Band."
Casino
A Casino at Elmhurst Park was located in southwest Mineral Wells, Texas, at the turn of the twentieth century. The structure was a large stucco building facing Elmhurst Lake (created by a dam on Pollard Creek) in the foreground. The lake was sometimes referred to as "Pollard Lake." Elmhurst Park was served by the Mineral Wells Electric Railroad (Street Car), with whom it seemed to have had a symbiotic relationship; both came into existence about 1903, and both went out of business about 1913.
The First Anniversary of the Aviation Engineer Force Activation
Troops and spectators celebrate the first anniversary of Aviation Engineer Force Activation at Wolters Air Force Base on April 10, 1952, with Colonel A.B. Campfield, the Commander of Troops; Brigadier General H.W. Ehrgott, Commanding; Colonel Philip G. Kemp, the Base Commander.
[The West Ward School]
Exterior of the West Ward School in Mineral Wells, TX.
[The North Entrance to Elmhurst Park]
The entrance to Elmhurst Park, Mineral Wells is shown here. The number "7830" in the upper left portion of the picture remains unexplained. The park was a recreational spot for the resort city. The park was closed in 1913, when trolley service was discontinued for lack of customers. As a direct result, the casino no longer exists, being also a casualty of the state's reform of gambling laws. It is now the site of the city sewage disposal facility.
The Sam Houston School--- An Afternoon Group of 1954
Students, teachers and the principal, D.R. Hudson, of the Sam Houston School's Afternoon Group are shown here in March of 1954. The picture was taken outside the school building.
[Women in a Decorated Car]
Five females ("Aunt Matie, Edith Preston, Lena, and two of Edith's friends", a legend states on the back)) in a decorated car outside the Western Union Telegraph office. Signs on and by the building read "Crazy Well Flats and Modern Rooms", "Cigars", and "Western Union Telegraph and Cable Office."
[People in an Automobile]
An automobile is shown here, decorated for a parade. The occupants of automobile are obviously dressed for the special occasion. The photograph is a view looking south on Oak Avenue at First Street, in downtown Mineral Wells. The ghostly images in the picture remain unexplained.
Panorama of Camp Wolters, TX
This picture is a panoramic photograph of Camp Wolters in Mineral Wells, Texas, the largest infantry replacement center in 1941. Labels on photograph identify (left to right) Target Range, Regimental Area No. 4, Dental Clinic,Guest House, Service Club, Theater, Regimental Area No. 3, Infantry Replacement Center/Headquarters Area, Regimental Area No. 6, Warehouse Area, Corps Area Service Command and Hospital Area, Regimental Area No. 2, Regimental Area No. 1, and Machine Gun Range.
Old Elmhurst Park , Allen & Charles,1907
Two people are shown standing on the wooden bridge at Elmhust Park, Mineral Wells, in 1907. A holograph inscription on the photograph that reads "Old Elmhurst Park, Allen & Charles, 1907", probably refers to the man and boy in the picture. Elmhurst Park, a very popular recreation area during its heyday, was located in southwest Mineral Wells at the end of the streetcar line. Patrons walked from the streetcar (in the background) across the wooden bridge to the Casino and other attractions.
[The Mineral Wells Fair of 1908]
Farm products, such as home-canned food items, fresh produce, and plant specimens are displayed here, within the Dance Pavilion at Elmhurst Park at the 1908 Mineral Wells Annual Fair, a Palo Pinto County Fair exhibit.
[A Sporting Event]
A group of people watching a pole-vaulting event is shown here. A vaulter goes over a crossbar set at approximately 10 feet in this picture. The covered area in the background is the Dance Pavilion at Elmhurst Park (also the site of the Palo Pinto County Fair at this early date). Two ladies, with their backs to the camera, at the rear of the crowd wear ladies' basketball uniforms of the day. The horse and buggy were a standard mode of transportation at this time--about 1910.
[The Mineral Wells High School Marching Band]
The Mineral Wells High School marching band is shown here performing on a football field in the late 1930's. The band director at that time was Mr. Dave Brunswick. See also "Mineral Wells High School Concert Band."