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ABOUT BROWSE FEED
The Sam Houston School--- An Afternoon Group of 1954
Students, teachers and the principal, D.R. Hudson, of the Sam Houston School's Afternoon Group are shown here in March of 1954. The picture was taken outside the school building.
[Women in a Decorated Car]
Five females ("Aunt Matie, Edith Preston, Lena, and two of Edith's friends", a legend states on the back)) in a decorated car outside the Western Union Telegraph office. Signs on and by the building read "Crazy Well Flats and Modern Rooms", "Cigars", and "Western Union Telegraph and Cable Office."
[People in an Automobile]
An automobile is shown here, decorated for a parade. The occupants of automobile are obviously dressed for the special occasion. The photograph is a view looking south on Oak Avenue at First Street, in downtown Mineral Wells. The ghostly images in the picture remain unexplained.
Panorama of Camp Wolters, TX
This picture is a panoramic photograph of Camp Wolters in Mineral Wells, Texas, the largest infantry replacement center in 1941. Labels on photograph identify (left to right) Target Range, Regimental Area No. 4, Dental Clinic,Guest House, Service Club, Theater, Regimental Area No. 3, Infantry Replacement Center/Headquarters Area, Regimental Area No. 6, Warehouse Area, Corps Area Service Command and Hospital Area, Regimental Area No. 2, Regimental Area No. 1, and Machine Gun Range.
Old Elmhurst Park , Allen & Charles,1907
Two people are shown standing on the wooden bridge at Elmhust Park, Mineral Wells, in 1907. A holograph inscription on the photograph that reads "Old Elmhurst Park, Allen & Charles, 1907", probably refers to the man and boy in the picture. Elmhurst Park, a very popular recreation area during its heyday, was located in southwest Mineral Wells at the end of the streetcar line. Patrons walked from the streetcar (in the background) across the wooden bridge to the Casino and other attractions.
[The Mineral Wells Fair of 1908]
Farm products, such as home-canned food items, fresh produce, and plant specimens are displayed here, within the Dance Pavilion at Elmhurst Park at the 1908 Mineral Wells Annual Fair, a Palo Pinto County Fair exhibit.
[A Sporting Event]
A group of people watching a pole-vaulting event is shown here. A vaulter goes over a crossbar set at approximately 10 feet in this picture. The covered area in the background is the Dance Pavilion at Elmhurst Park (also the site of the Palo Pinto County Fair at this early date). Two ladies, with their backs to the camera, at the rear of the crowd wear ladies' basketball uniforms of the day. The horse and buggy were a standard mode of transportation at this time--about 1910.
Camp Wolters - Texas
Illustrated here is a panoramic view of Camp Wolters, Texas. Labels on photograph identify (left to right) Area No. 4, Sports Arena, Service Club, Area No. 5, Area No. 3, Area No. 2, and Area No.1. Platoons of soldiers are marching on the left side of the photograph.
[The St. Nicholas Hotel]
A group of men stand in front of the St. Nicholas Hotel. A colophon at the lower right designates this picture as a photographic souvenir from Minerals Wells, taken by Dan W. Evans. The building had a varied history. It was first (in 1904) an unnamed two-and-one-half-story sanitarium, then re-named the St. Nicholas Hotel, and then later it became the Delaware Hotel. It was located at N. Oak and NE 3rd Street. The building was eventually consumed by fire on October of 1907. The back of photograph has a T and P Railway logotype and this information about the Jericho Fine Photo Company: "Mountain and Donkey Groups, View Souvenirs and Scenery of Min-Wells, Kodak Supplies and Finishing, Button and Stamp Photos a Specialty. Dan W. Evans Prop. Min Wells, Tex."
[A Play Day at Elmhurst Park]
Girls are shown playing a basketball game in Mineral Wells' Elmhurst Park, about 1910. The scene catches a "Jump Ball" during progress of the game. Please note the women's uniforms, and also the enthusiastic crowd.
On the Broadway of America Highway, Mineral Wells, Texas
The title on the Picture states, "On The Broadway Of America Highway, Mineral Wells, Texas." This picture shows a section of the Bankhead Highway, looking east where the main road to Millsap descends from the mountain on which the Mineral Wells Airport stands. Once identified as part of US Highway 281 south of town [Mineral Wells], it overlooks much of the scenery viewed from "Observation Point",at one time called one of the most scenic vistas in the state. The Bankhead Highway was America's first transcontinental highway, starting at Mile Zero on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D. C. It terminated in San Diego, California, and was named for Senator John Hollis Bankhead, head of the Good Roads Movement. It was once labeled "The Broadway of America." The road was approved by Congress in 1916, but construction was delayed by World War I. Hundreds of miles were built in the 1920's when it crossed Palo Pinto County. Mineral Wells' main streets, Hubbard Street and SE 6th Avenue were part of the Bankhead Highway. Hollis Bankhead was the grandfather of Broadway Actress, Tallulah Bankhead. His brother ran a Drugstore in Gordon, Texas, with the proud motto: "The best is none too good for our customers." The drugstore also advertised, "Everything from the cradle to the grave", selling products ranging from baby food to coffins.
[A Women's Basketball Game at Elmhurst Park, Mineral Wells]
A women's basketball game (at Elmhurst Park, Mineral Wells, taken about 1910) is shown in progress here. A "Dancing Pavilion" is visible in the background. Please note the players' uniforms. This scene shows a battle for the rebound after a shot at the basket.
Sam Houston School
Students, teachers and principal D.R. Hudson, of the Sam Houston School in March 1954 stand outside the school building.
[The D. M. Howard Store]
A photograph taken during the construction of the D. M. Howard Store, located at 101 SE 1st Avenue. D. M. Howard was the first of five brothers to arrive in Mineral Wells. He built the first large department store(s) here. This was the first in a complex of Howard Brothers stores, and later housed the J. M. Belcher Furniture Store and its successor, R. & W. Furniture. Howard himself departed this life in 1910. The building was torn down in 1975.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 1 of 21, Dec. 22, 1975]
A fire destroyed the Damron Hotel, December 22, 1975. The hotel was located at 109 West Hubbard Street, facing north, before the unfortunate conflagration. The fire also destroyed Davidson Hardware, located in the same block.
Piedmont Hotel - [The First Piedmont With Numerous Individuals on Porches]
The First Piedmont Hotel. This photograph was probably taken in the early twentieth century, judging by the attire of the men photographed. The photograph appears on page 104 of "Time Was...", Second Edition.
[Two Men and a Woman]
This picture shows two unidentified men and a woman. The photograph is believed to have been taken during construction of the road up Wynn Mountain east of Palo Pinto (prior to construction of the Bankhead Highway, which was built following passage of "Good Roads Act" in 1916.)
[A Man with a Catfish]
An unknown man is pictured holding a catfish that he has presumably caught. An embossed legend at the base of the picture states that the photograph was taken by Young's Photography, Mineral Wells, Texas. (Palo Pinto County held the Texas record in 2005 for a catfish. A ninety-six-pound monster was caught at the outflow of Morris Sheppard Dam on Possum Kingdom Lake.)
[People in a Parade]
A buggy is shown here, filled with people dressed in what appears to be fashions from the 1920's. The buggy wheels are decorated for a parade and the buggy itself has the name "T. J. Green" on it. The location appears to be in front of the Gibson Well in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue, now [2008] the location of the First Christian Church.
[The Gulf and Brazos Valley Railroad Depot]
A caption to the photograph states: "Gulf and Brazos Valley Railroad Depot 1899-1902. Erected back some 80 years ago, and served the Brazos Valley Railroad from Mineral Wells to Peck City near Millsap, now known as Bennett." The area formerly known as Peck City is now the location of an Acme brick plant, and is named "Bennett" for the rail switch that serves the plant. Standing on the right in the photograph is Noble Nuttall, father of Verne Nuttall, the first depot operator and telegraph operator. Please note the guitar near the woman at the window. The depot was once located on the site now occupied by the Hayes Lumber Company, in the 300 block on SE 1st Avenue. The newspaper caption: "Passengers would ride on the Texas and Pacific to Peck City and come by the Brazos Valley train from Peck City to Mineral Wells" is incorrect. The GULF and BRAZOS RIVER RAILWAY was strictly a freight line that hauled coal from the Rock Creek mines (east of Mineral Wells) to the T&P main line at Peck City. The first depot in Mineral Wells for passenger service from Weatherford was built when the W.-M.W.-N.W. that first arrived in Mineral Wells in 1891. It burned down, and it was replaced by the current brick depot in 1902, the year the GBV was sold at a sheriff's auction in Weatherford. (Photo courtesy of Verne Nuttall)
[Two men dressed as Bonnie and Clyde]
Two men, posing as the notorious gangsters of the 'thirties (Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow), standing beside a (1932 Ford?), are shown in front of Woods Camera Shop. Woods Camera Shop advertises (on a faded sign in front of the store) "Eastman Dealer - Enlarging Framing Finishing - Kodaks Loaned Free" The occasion of this disguise remains, as yet, unknown.
Oak Street, Looking North
An early view of Oak Street (now Oak Avenue), looking North is shown here. The first intersecting road is Hubbard Street. Part of the Oxford Hotel is visible on the southeast corner of Hubbard and Oak. Please note the utter lack of street lights. Street car tracks and an overhead cable run on Oak. Mineral Wells Electric System (Street Car) ceased operation in 1913. The downtown streets were paved in 1914. A hardware store, possibly Davidson's, is on the southwest corner of Hubbard and Oak.
Our City
A photograph, taken from Welcome Mountain looking West down NW 4th Street, of unknown date is illustrated here. The small brick building in 4th Street is the Crazy Well. The first Crazy Water Hotel (left middle of picture) was built on same location as present Crazy Water hotel. The present hotel is much larger and extends to the Crazy Well. Note the Crazy Flats (drinking pavilion with apartments) in foreground. Note the first Catholic Church, on West Mountain. The West Ward School and the High School are in upper left quadrant of picture.
[The West Texas Chamber of Commerce Parade, 1925]
The West Texas Chamber of Commerce Parade, moving west on NE 2nd Street in Mineral Wells is shown here. The parade was staged to welcome the 1925 Convention. Businesses include R. O. Norman and Company, Dry Cleaners; the Whatley-Maddox Motor Co (Ford and Lincoln); the Mineral Wells Sanitarium; and the United States Post Office.
[A Panorama Taken in1974 (eighth)]
A panorama of houses and streets, taken from from Welcome Mountain s shown here. The purpose of the photograph remains uncertain.
[The Mineral Wells Golf Country Club and Lake]
Please note the men in golf attire standing on bank, one of whom is holding a bag of golf clubs. Knee-length knickers with decorated socks were typical golf wear in the Roaring Twenties. Others are lounging around on the bank between club house and lake on a typical lazy Sunday afternoon.
[Ladies with parasols]
"Sllew La Renim" (a social club) was "Mineral Wells" spelled backwards. Its members pose in front of the Old Post Office in 1913. Identified in the photograph are: Anna Mae Guinn, Ernestine Pollard, May Belle Smith, Ann Locke Galbraith, Ruby Andrews, Mattie Withers. Note the Mineral Wells Sanitarium in the left background. This photograph may be found on page 118 of "TIME WAS...", First Edition by A.F. Weaver.
[Paving East Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells]
A group of men work on paving East Hubbard street in Mineral Wells. Electrical lines are present. Street paving in Mineral Wells began in 1914. On the right is the Richards House. Behind the house is Lamar Flats water pavilion, now [2008]the site of the Baker Hotel.
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (tenth)]
Shown here is a panorama of the Baker Hotel and First United Methodist Church, taken from the west.
[A View of Mesquite Street, Mineral Wells]
An early scene of Mesquite Street (now [2008] NE 1st Avenue) looking North toward old U.S. Post Office from the corner of East Hubbard Street. Electrical lines are present as are cars and trucks typical of the post-1914 era, when the streets of Mineral Wells were paved. The cornerstone for the Post Office was laid in May, 1912. The building on the near right housed Campbell's Bargain store. It occupied the site of the current Baker Hotel (Opened in 1929.)
Fairfield Inn
The Fairfield Inn, built by Col. Walter H. Boykin around the turn of the twentieth century, was a very popular rooming and boarding house in the early days of Mineral Wells. It was located at 814 North Oak Street, across Oak Street and one block north of the contemporary Hexagon Hotel. Part of the retaining wall shown in the picture still exists. Mr. Boykin built his home at 1501 SE 4th Avenue. The home was later sold to William Whipple Johnson, who operated the Rock Creek coal mines in eastern Parker County around 1910. Mr. Johnson, with his brother Harvey, had previously opened the coal mines at Thurber on the Palo Pinto/Erath county line in 1908.
Sewerage Disposal Plant
Mineral Wells' Sewerage Disposal Plant was built on the site of the former Elmhurst Park on Pollard Creek, approximately 2 miles SSW of the city. The city obtained the park property, and built the sewerage treatment plant during the recovery from the Great Depression of the 1930's. Shown here is a photograph of a clipping from a newspaper.
US Army [Helicopter] 613210 [and Pilot]
A picture of a U.S. Army helicopter and pilot, taken at Ft. Wolters Army Base before the close of the fort in 1974. Ft. Wolters was home to a primary helicopter flight training school during the Vietnam War. In a war that featured helicopters, 70% of the helicopter pilots in the Vietnamese War received all or part of their training at Ft. Wolters in Mineral Wells. The Helicopter Pilots Association is the primary sponsor of the National Viet Nam War Museum being built near the airport in Mineral Wells. The museum currently contains a half-size replica of the Viet Nam War Memorial Wall in Washington, D. C., and a beautiful "Meditation Garden."
[A View of NE 1st Avenue]
In this view of NE 1st Avenue, the Old Post Office Building is shown at the end of the street and at the left of the picture. It is now [2007] The Woman's Club. The Baker Hotel (apparently under construction) can be seen at the far right of the picture. The Southwestern Bell Telephone Company building in the center of the picture sits across NE 1st Street, and to the north of the Baker.
[A Fire in Mineral Wells, Texas]
This picture is probably a photograph of the fire which destroyed the Delaware Hotel (Formerly known as the St. Nicholas Hotel) on North Oak Avenue at NE 3rd Street. The open ditch in the right foreground shows that the streets were not paved, indicating that the fire occurred prior to 1914. The pump-and-ladder fire wagon used to battle the fire was drawn by two beautiful white horses named Joe and Frank. The hotel was never rebuilt. The standing building in the photograph is Mineral Wells Grain and Feed, but its location has not been confirmed. The signification of the number "6" on the picture invites conjecture.
[Farmer's Market at the Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park]
This photograph, printed in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS IN Mineral Wells..." on page 88, illustrates a display of fruit jars at the Mineral Wells Fair, held at the Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park. Canned fruits and vegetables were customarily entered in Palo Pinto County's annual fall harvest fair. Elmhurst Park hosted the fair, among other popular events during its heyday. The popularity of personal automobile transportation made transit by street car unprofitable by 1913, and the park closed shortly after the street cars were discontinued. The City of Mineral Wells' water treatment facilities are now located in the southwest part of town, on the former Elmhurst Park property.
[Lynch Plaza , 1 of 3]
This photograph of Lynch Plaza and The First State Bank (now Home Health in 2008) was taken from the 100 block of South Oak Street. The Gentleman's Closet is next to the bank (The store is vacant as of 2008). The Baker Hotel can be seen above Lynch Plaza, at the corner of E. Hubbard and S. Oak Streets.
[Downtown Mineral Wells: 1 of 3]
This photograph of downtown Mineral Wells was taken looking north on Oak Avenue (US Highway 281) from SE 1st Street (US Highway 180 E). The visible buildings are: (on the left), Hill's Ladies' Apparel, Cole's House of Flowers, (at the intersecting street, [Hubbard Street--US Hwy. 180 W]), and George's Men's Store. Lynch Plaza and a parking lot are on the right, with the Texas Historical Commission marker on the wall in the lower right-hand corner commemorating the first mineral-water well in the City. In the background, the First State Bank can also be seen (also on the intersecting Hubbard Street, US Highway 180 W.)
[The Mineral Wells Savings and Loan]
The Mineral Wells Savings and Loan was once located at 101 SE 1st Avenue. The First State Bank stands at this location as of 2008.
[Crystal Plant]
A picture of the Crystal Production Line is shown here. On the back of the photograph is typed: CRYSTALS WERE THEN PACKED INTO GREEN AND WHITE BOXES AND RUN DOWN THE CONVEYOR WHERE GIRLS PLACED THE LIDS. AT THE END OF THE BELT A MACHINE WRAPPED THE BOX IN CELLOPHANE. PHOTO 1930
[Dr. J.H. McCracken Home, 3 of 3: Different View]
The Dr. J.H. McCracken home, built in 1904 at 516 West Hubbard, and restored by Gil Hull. Joseph Hill McCracken was born on a farm near Springtown, Texas, October 1, 1867. He graduated from the University of Tennessee Medical School in 1891, and returned to Texas. He married Marie Sue Wilson, the daughter of Oliver Loving's youngest daughter, Margaret on October 15, 1895. He was elected President of the Texas Medical Association in 1911 and practiced medicine in Mineral Wells for over fifty years. He frequently laughed about having "delivered babies of babies of babies." Dr. McCracken died in March of 1954, and his wife died in November of 1955. Both are buried in Mineral Wells' Woodland Park Cemetery. Professor John N. McCracken, who established the Mineral Wells College directly across the street west of the McCracken home, is believed to be Dr. McCracken's father. [For details of the Mineral Wells College, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School, Texas"]
Oak Street, Looking South
This picture shows the 100 block of what is now N. Oak Avenue, looking south. The "Palace Saloon" sign is still visible in 2008. The Palo Pinto County Courthouse Annex currently [2010] occupies the building that once housed Poston's Dry Goods (just down the street from the Palace Saloon). Please note the absence of trolley tracks--or the festoon of wires required to keep its power-line in place. The unpaved street dates the photograph prior to 1914, and probably prior to the previous picture.
[The Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park]
Spectators are shown here, at a spring play-day frolic at Elmhurst Park around 1910. The popular park once boasted a Casino, a Dancing Pavilion, Exhibit Halls, and Outdoor Sports Fields. It hosted the County Fair and sports events until 1913. On the closure of Elmhurst Park, the City of Mineral Wells became the owner of the property. It was used for a housing development during World War II to accommodate families of soldiers and civilian workers at Camp Wolters. The City of Mineral Wells built city's water treatment facilities on the site of the former park after World War II.
[Dr. J.H. McCracken Home, 1 of 3: Little Rock School and Fannin School]
The Dr. J.H. McCracken home was built in 1904 at 516 W. Hubbard Street, and was restored by Gil Hull. Joseph Hill McCracken was born on a farm near Springtown, Texas, October 1, 1867. He graduated from the University of Tennessee Medical School in 1891, and returned to Texas. On October 15, 1895, he married Marie Sue Wilson, the daughter of Oliver Loving's youngest daughter, Margaret. He was elected President of the Texas Medical Association in 1911, and practiced medicine in Mineral Wells for over fifty years. He frequently laughed about having "delivered babies of babies of babies." Dr. McCracken died in March of 1954, and his wife died in November of 1955. Both are buried in Mineral Wells' Woodland Park Cemetery. Professor John N, McCracken, who established the Mineral Wells College directly across the street west of the McCracken home, is believed to be Dr. McCracken's father. [For details of the Mineral Wells College, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School,Texas"] The "Old High School" and the "Little Rock School" (left side of the picture) are visible in the background.
[Dedication of the "Little Rock Schoolhouse" Museum: A Marker is Unveiled]
A marker commemorating the conversion of Mineral Wells' first school to a museum. "The Little Rock Schoolhouse" was built in 1884, and though tuition was charged to the students to pay the teacher, the school building, itself, was built by the city. A granite marker to commemorate the conversion of the school to a museum was unveiled at this dedication.
[Downtown Mineral Wells, 2 of 3: A Different View]
This photograph of downtown Mineral Wells shows (left to right): Hill's Ladies' Apparel; Cole's House of flowers; (Intersecting street): George's Man's Shop; the Professional Building (formerly the Texas Theater); Poston's Dry Goods;Palace Saloon; Marsden's Shoe Store (former Gem theater). The Crazy Hotel is visible in the background.
[Downtown Mineral Wells, 3 of 3: The 100 Block]
This photograph shows downtown Mineral Wells. The dominant building is Mineral Wells Office Supply (formerly Lattner Funeral Home), followed by R.P.'s Western Outlet; next door: Jann's Boutique; next, Jann's Fashions. Next is Hill's Style Shoppe.
[Lynch Plaza and Martin Building, Parking Lot ]
A parking lot for Lynch Plaza and the Martin Building is located at the corner of West Hubbard Street and SE 1st Avenue. The Berry and Associates Building is visible in the background.
[The Mineral Wells Savings and Loan--and Lynch Plaza Parking Lot]
The Mineral Wells Savings and Loan was once located at 101 SE 1st Avenue. The Savings and Loan building, in this 1988 view (looking south down SE 1st Avenue), is in the left foreground on the southeast corner of Hubbard and 1st Avenue. Across SE 1st Avenue (to the right and west of the Savings and Loan) is the parking lot for Lynch Plaza. In the background, the next street south is SE 1st Street. The Dollar General store occupies the former Piggly Wiggly grocery store on the southeast corner of this next block (near the center of the picture), where Mineral Wells' first Post Office once stood. The Savings and Loan building was eventually torn down, and the First State Bank is now [2008] at this location.
Sangcura Sprudel Wells
The Sangcura Sprudel Wells. On back of photograph is written: "Located at 800 N.W. 2nd Avenue." The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street. The porches were enclosed and it was turned into a rooming house. The building burned down in 1973.