Boyce Ditto Public Library - 173 Matching Results

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[Taken From North Oak]
This information is printed on the back of photograph: "Taken from the North Oak and N. E. 3rd. Street looking North May 28, 1975 by A.F. Weaver." Businesses that are visible in the photograph are, in order: The Crazy Water Hotel, Community Aerial Cable Company, Bennett's Office Supply and The Grand Theater.
Woodmen of the World Camp Meeting , June 19, 1947
A white-ink legend on the face of this photograph reads: Woodman [sic] of the World Camp Meeting----6-19-47 Mineral Wells, Texas. phillips [sic] photographic [sic] Service [sic] A typed legend on the back of the photograph reads: WOW MEETING 6-19-47 held in Convention Hall. Recognized Front [sic] row from left: #1 Ezra Wortham. #5 Charlie Sheridan, #6 George Oliver 3rd. Row standing #1 John Birdwell, #5 Louis Fryer, #6 John Miller, #7 Ben Yeager, #12 Bill Teichman. 4th row: #1 Charlie Langley #15 Roy Langley [Unreadable deletions in green ink above appear this caption] This picture appears in Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" on page 165.
[The Welcome Sign]
The WELCOME Sign (shown here) was built in 1922 by George Holmgren, the Texas Rotary Club's Governor,in his San Antonio iron works following the State Rotary Club's Convention in Mineral Wells. He gave the sign to the people of Mineral Wells with the understanding that they would maintain what was, at the time, the world's largest non-commercial lighted sign. The original incandescent bulbs were later replaced with lower-maintenance red neon lights by the Mineral Wells Jaycees. A Warrant Officer Company from Fort Wolters moved the sign from its original site on East Mountain to the east side of Bald Mountain (now called Welcome Mountain), overlooking Elmwood Cemetery, in 1972. It remains there today [2008], lighted at its base with flood lights, to greet visitors coming from the east. This is a picture, taken in 1972, of the restored sign.
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 13, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 12, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 17, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 12, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 24, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 30, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 22, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 16, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 23, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 23, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
[Lake Mineral Wells, 2 of 4]
The dam of Lake Mineral Wells is shown here during a flood, March 1976. A large area of Palo Pinto and Parker counties received heavy rains (up to 7.2 inches in places) during a three-day period. The road directly below the dam was entirely under water, and the effect of water flowing over the road is barely visible. Heavy damage was also reported over a substantial part of the City of Mineral Wells as a result of the downpour.
[Lake Mineral Wells, 3 of 4: Sign]
A sign in front of the spillway (which was part of the dam for Mineral Wells Lake before it was rebuilt to a higher level during World War Two) says, "Water For Texans."
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 10, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 22, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 14, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 19, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 11, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 29, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 16, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 5, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 9, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 15, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 19, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 26, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 20, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 2, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 7, Ed. 1 Thursday, January 1, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 12, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 5, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 15, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 26, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Brazos Tributary (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 21, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 9, 1970
Weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas covering news from Palo Pinto County along with advertising.
Famous Mineral Water
The Famous Water Company, founded by Ed Dismuke (still located at 215 NW 6th Street) has been restored, and still [2007] sells mineral water. The large concrete bottle depicts the original shape of the container of the product sold. Dismuke also established a plant on the east bank of Lake Pinto, west of Mineral Wells, to manufacture his "PRONTO-LAX" Crystals. He organized the Mineral Wells Lakewood Scenic Railway in partnership with local banker Cicero Smith, whose gasoline-powered "Dinky Cars" operated quarter-hourly between Lake Pinto and Mineral Wells from 1905 to 1909. The Famous Water Company currently sells three grades of water: Regular, full-strength mineral water; deep (400 ft.) well water; and deep-well water that has been ionized and filtered by reverse osmosis.
[Poston's Dry Goods, 13 of 15: Inside Cashier Station]
Photograph of Will Poston standing behind a desk in Poston Dry Goods and reaching up to the handle of a pulley that was part of a messenger system in the store. Part of the store is visible behind him, including boxes stacked on shelves and clothing laid out on tables.
[Partial Minutes: Mineral Wells Bicentennial Committee, November 18, 1975]
First page of the minutes of the Mineral Wells Bicentennial Committee, held in the old Nazareth Hospital in 1975. It includes a list of attendees and a summary of some of the discussion points.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 20 of 21: Different View of the Fire]
Shown here is yet another view of fire at the Damron Hotel, December 22, 1975 is shown here. The hotel was located in the 109 W. Hubbard Street. The fire also destroyed Davidson Hardware, which was in the same building, and damaged Pemberton's ( nearby appliance store) and George's Man's shop a well as damaging the back of Hill's Style Shop.
[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 3 of 3: The East Side of the Construction]
This series of photographs of the construction of Mineral Wells Savings and Loan was taken in 1975. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975, to make room for the Savings and Loan. D.M. Howard was the first of five brothers to arrive from North Carolina. He later sent for his other brothers to establish the Howard Brothers Department Stores complex in the early 1900's. The Baker Hotel, directly across E. Hubbard north of the Savings and Loan, is seen to the left of the picture. Across SE 1st Street, to the south, were the Piggly Wiggly Grocery store (at the site of Mineral Wells' first Post Office) and the S & H Green Stamp store. The First State Bank now [2012] occupies this entire city block.
Three Railroads to Mineral Wells
A pamphlet, containing a brief history of the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railway, the Gulf and Brazos Valley Railway, and the Gulf, Texas and Western Railway is shown here. It has a map of rail routes, photographs, and copies of schedules with ticket prices.
[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 1 of 3, The Baker Hotel is in the Background]
This series of photographs was taken in 1975, during the construction of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan at 101 SE 1st Avenue. The Howard Brothers Department Store was an early occupant of the site. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975 to make room for the Savings and Loan. A new First State Bank currently [2011] occupies this entire city block. A good view of the south side of the Baker Hotel is visible in the background.
Medical Facts for Pilots
This pamphlet gives an overview of information for pilots to maintain good health and recognize warning signs of problems they might face specific to flying.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 18 of 21: Individual in Front of the Burning Hotel]
The Damron Hotel, built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort, burned completely on December 22, 1975. Shown here is another view of the front entrance to the hotel as flames burst through the front wall of the building. The gesturing individual with the hard hat has not been identified.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 21 of 21: An Early Stage, Looking East, Smoke Billowing]
Here is a view of the Damron Hotel (formerly located at 109 W. Hubbard Street)during the early stages of the fire (on December 22, 1975) that completely destroyed it. It was a popular hotel during the heyday of Mineral Wells--through the "Roaring Twenties", the Great Depression and World War II.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 17 of 21: Two Individuals on the Street Northwest of the Fire]
Shown here is another view of the plume of thick black smoke at the height of the fire that completely destroyed the Damron Hotel December 22, 1975, along with two hard-hatted individuals (presumably fire-fighters) standing in the street. It was a very popular hotel during the mineral water industry's heyday through the "Roaring Twenties", Great Depression and World War II. By the time of the fire, however, one informant remarked--verbally--that no respectable lady permitted herself to be found within a block of the hotel. Sic transit, it would appear, gloria mundi.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 6 of 21: Bystanders Observing the Fire]
The Damron Hotel was destroyed (on December 22, 1975) in a spectacular fire that received extensive photographic coverage. The hotel was located at 109 W. Hubbard. This is another picture of that immense conflagration. All the firemen answered a call that came in at 9:08 on the morning of the fire. The City of Weatherford also sent men and equipment over to help. Volunteers who were not themselves firemen also helped. Other buildings that suffered damage were Pemberton's (an appliance store across the street and west of the hotel), and the hardware store (Bought by Bob Sturtivant) next to the hotel. Note the height of the flames in this picture taken in the later stages of the fire.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 3 of 21: Baker Hotel in Background]
The Damron Hotel (very popular in the resort city of Mineral Wells through the periods of the "Roaring Twenties", The Great Depression and World War II) was originally built as The Colonial Hotel in 1906 by J.T. Holt. Mr. Holt also owned a hardware store at the back of the hotel facing S. Oak Avenue, and a one-room buggy showroom between the hardware store and the hotel. The hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron around 1917 in exchange for a ranch, and the name was changed to reflect the new ownership. Mr. Holt sold the hardware store to his manager, John Davidson. The Damron Hotel and Davidson Hardware burned completely on December 22, 1975. This picture of the fire was taken looking east on Hubbard Street. The Baker Hotel in the left middle of the photograph is to the north of most of the smoke.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 11 of 21: Fighting the Fire on W. Hubbard St.]
Shown here is another picture in the series of photographs of the fire that destroyed the Damron Hotel during the holiday season of 1975. This smoke-shrouded scene of W. Hubbard, shows the front entrance to the hotel in the earlier stages of the fire's progress. The Damron was built in 1906, during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort spa. It burned completely on December 22,1975. The hotel's name was changed in 1917 when Mr. Holt (who had built the hotel) traded it to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. It was a very popular hotel through the "Roaring Twenties", the Great Depression and World War II.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 4 of 21, Fire Inside the Structure]
This is another view of the spectacular fire that consumed the Damron Hotel on December 22, 1975. The hotel was built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife. The name was changed in 1917 when the hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. The fire received extensive photographic coverage. Note the height of the flames in this picture, taken in the later stages of the fire.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 2 of 21: View South/Southeast ]
The Colonial Hotel was built in 1906 by Mr. J. T. Holt for his second wife. Mr. Holt also owned a hardware store on S. Oak at the back of the hotel. The name of the hotel was changed to The Damron Hotel around 1917 when Mr. Holt traded it to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. A hardware store, hard by, was sold to Mr. Holt's manager, John Davidson. The Damron Hotel, located at 109 W. Hubbbard Street, along with Davidson Hardware, burned completely on December 22, 1975. Please note the Christmas decoration, symbol of the season, on the telephone pole above the fire truck. The main entrance to the hotel is faintly visible through the dense smoke to the rear of the fire truck. The Crazy Hotel can be seen at the lower left edge of the picture.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 9 of 21: Firemen and a Fire Truck Near the North Side of Budiling]
This photograph shows another view of the early response to the holiday conflagration that consumed the Damron Hotel on December 22, 1975. The Damron was built in 1906, during Mineral Wells' heyday as a popular resort city. Originally named the Colonial Hotel by J. T. Holt, and built for his second wife, the name of the hotel was changed in 1917 when Mr. Holt traded the hotel to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. The hotel was located at 109 W. Hubbard, and the spectacular fire received extensive photographic coverage.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 8 of 21: An Early Stage of the Fire, Looking North]
This view of the spectacular holiday [Christmas] fire that consumed the Damron Hotel completely on December 22, 1975, was taken from SW 1st Street at the southwest corner of the block in the early stages of the fire. The Damron Hotel was built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by J. T. Holt for his second wife. She adamantly refused to live in the country. The name was changed in 1917 when it was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard. The fire received extensive photographic coverage.
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (first)]
Shown here is a panoramic View of Mineral Wells, Texas taken August 8, 1974. The Baker Hotel and the Crazy Water Hotel are visible. The Convention Center is seen in the far left of the photograph. The view is from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain over north Mineral Wells.
[Panoramic Photograph of Mineral Wells]
Panoramic photograph of the Baker Hotel and First United Methodist Church (in front), taken from Welcome Mountain.
[Panoramic Photograph of Mineral Wells]
Panoramic photograph of East Hubbard Street, taken from Welcome Mountain, showing Elmwood cemetery.
[Panoramic Photograph of Mineral Wells]
Panoramic photograph of the city from Welcome Mountain. Elmwood Cemetery is visible in the upper left part of the picture.
[Panoramic Photograph of Mineral Wells]
Panoramic photograph of Mineral Wells, looking east from West Mountain. The Baker Hotel and First National Bank (now Bank of America) are visible in center of photograph. Native plants are pictured in the left of photograph.
[Panoramic Photograph of Mineral Wells]
Panoramic photo taken from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain over North Oak Street in Mineral Wells. The Convention Center, Box Factory, and The Crazy Water Hotel are visible. Native plants are visible in the foreground.
[Panoramic Photograph of Mineral Wells]
Panoramic photo of Mineral Wells,is shown, looking southwest from East Mountain over the First National Bank (now Bank of America).
[Panoramic Photograph of Mineral Wells]
Photograph of a panoramic view of northwest Mineral Wells from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain. Included in photograph are the Convention Center, the Box Factory, and the Crazy Water Hotel.
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]
A home at 401 NW 4th Avenue taken June 1974 is illustrated here. The house was built by P.E. Bock, in what appears to be Colonial Revival style.
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]
This picture gives a better view of the house shown in the succeeding photograph. It was taken in June of 1974. The house was built by P.E. Bock.
[Jarmon Alvis Lynch and wife]
A photograph of Jarmon Alvis Lynch and his wife, taken October 1, 1977. He was the grandson J. A. Lynch, the founder of Mineral Wells. He is shown standing on the steps of the Rock School House (in Mineral Wells)in this 1977 photograph, and holding his drawing of the Lynch cabins, which also shows the drilling rig his grandfather used to dig the first mineral well.