Boyce Ditto Public Library - 23 Matching Results

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"Crazy" Water Crystals Plant

Description: The "Crazy" Water Crystals Plant was built in 1919. Mineral water was boiled down in the plant, until only the mineral crystals were left. The crystals became an early version of "instant food" when dissolved in water. Radio advertising in the 1930's over the Texas Quality Network, direct from the lobby of the Crazy Hotel, developed a market for the "Crazy Water Crystals" all over the world. This picture of the plant has been computer-enhanced.
Date: unknown

The Right Ticket

Description: An old advertisement for Mineral Wells, touting the "Pleasures" to be had in the city. The lady's crown displays the legend "Health & Pleasure." The "Pleasures" obtainable in the city need not be discussed, as they are plainly described in the picture, which may be found on page 91 of the second edition of A. F. Weaver's book, "Time Was..."
Date: unknown

Mr. Lynch On His Way to Discover Mineral Wells

Description: This picture is a photograph of a cartoon. See also "Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells" and "The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877." Please note the centipede, illustrated along with other forms of wildlife. Also, please note the Indians, who appear to be friendly. A.F. Weaver took this cartoon from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters" (q.v.) that is in the Palo Pinto County Album collection (q.v.) It is written in the nineteenth-century burlesque style, and need not be taken seriously.
Date: October 16, 2006

The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877

Description: This photograph illustrates a cartoon. "1880" is written in ink at bottom of the photograph, evidently in correction of the cartoon. Lynch arrived in what would later be Mineral Wells in 1877. His first well, dug to forty-one feet in 1878, was dry. The second well, drilled deeper, was in 1880. Please see also "Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells" and "Mr. Lynch on His Way to Discover Mineral Wells." The cartoon appears to have been taken by A. F. Weaver from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters" which is in the holdings of the Palo Pinto County Album (q.v.). The booklet was written in the nineteenth-century burlesque tradition, and Weaver makes no comment on the cartoon or the booklet.
Date: unknown

[A Bottle-shaped Souvenir Booklet]

Description: Two pages of a souvenir booklet touting the benefits of Mineral Wells, Texas are illustrated here. The shape suggests a bottle of mineral water. Dr. Dan Cupid has abandoned his bow and arrow in favor of mineral water to treat heart conditions. Among his stock of waters prescribed are bottles from the Crazy, Carlsbad, Gibson, and Lamar Wells. There are other pages of this booklet elsewhere in this collection. They could perhaps be placed together in a file at some time in the future.
Date: unknown

The Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells

Description: A.F. Weaver obtained this cartoon from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters", now in the Palo Pinto County Album collection (q.v.). The booklet is written in the nineteenth-century burlesque tradition, and is not meant to be taken seriously. See also the cartoons "The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877" and "Mr. Lynch on His Way to Discover Mineral Wells."
Date: unknown

[A Bottle-Shaped Map of Attractions]

Description: A bottle-shaped flier is illustrated here, showing the attractions and services in Mineral Wells. Evidently, this is the interior of the flier. See "Bottle-Shaped Mineral Water Ad" for the cover. All hotels, boarding houses, wells, and activities are listed, including fox hunting. See also [Bottle-Shaped Romantic Mineral Water Ad].
Date: unknown

[A Bottle-Shaped Romantic Mineral Water Advertisement]

Description: The interior of a bottle-shaped advertisement for mineral water is shown here. It claims romantic properties for the water. See also [Bottle-Shaped Mineral Water Ad] and [Bottle-Shaped Map of Attractions].
Date: unknown

[A Bottle-Shaped Mineral Water Advertisement]

Description: A picture of a mineral water advertisement, probably the cover of a flier is shown here. This is an example of the exaggerated claims made about mineral water. It advertises an "Unscientific mixture of water, bottled in bond in Mineral Wells by Pleasant Memory, and marketed as 'Donkaione.' " For the (probable) interior of the flier see [Bottle-Shaped Map of Attractions]. See also [Bottle-Shaped Romantic Mineral Water Advertisement].
Date: unknown

[Newspaper Clipping of A Mineral Wells School, Texas]

Description: A newspaper clipping with a photograph of a Mineral Wells School. This clipping had been mounted in a scrapbook, and the legible portion of the caption says, "Mineral Wells School, Texas." The whole caption read: Mineral Wells College. [sic]--A School for Both Sexes The building, which the Weatherford Democrat of September 12, 1895 says would be built in Mineral Wells (It would have been in Romanesque architecture), was to offer "Classical, Scientific, English, Music, Elocution, and Art Courses" . Professor J. McCracken was the head of the school. The building was never built, because the state provided education up to (but not including) college. A need for further education was not felt. .
Date: 1902?

[Dismuke's Famous Mineral Crystals Label]

Description: One of the by-products of the water which made Mineral Wells famous was mineral crystals, which were shipped all over the world. Purchasers could dissolve the crystals in tap water and (reportedly) receive the same benefits from the reconstituted water as from the well water. The Famous Water Company and the Famous Crystal Company were founded by Ed Dismuke, a druggist from Waco who came to Mineral Wells for his health. The Famous Water Company is still in operation (under different ownership) and it is the only mineral water company in Mineral Wells at this time. Ed Dismuke is buried in Elmwood Cemetery. He died in 1957 at the age of 97.
Date: unknown

The Health Resort Quarterly, 1 of 4, Cover

Description: The cover of The (October 1915) Health Resort Quarterly, published by the Commercial Club of Mineral Wells, Texas is illustrated here. The wreath on the cover frames a lady's arm and hand holding a glass of (mineral) water with captions "ANALYSIS HAS PROVED IT TO HAVE NO EQUAL" above and "FAMED THE WORLD OVER" below, referring to the mineral water from the local wells. A colophon at bottom reads: "Index Print [symbol] Mineral Wells."
Date: October 1915

[A Mineral Wells Advertisement]

Description: A 1906 seasonal advertisement, compliments Central Texas Realty Association, depicts a young lady (An Art Nouveau goddess?) half-kneeling within a frame that suggests stained glass. She is holding a water jug, from which pours a stream of healing elixir that splashes into the lowermost center of the brochure. Decorative scrolls reminiscent of wrought iron sculpture decorate the advertisement. Stars, both in the advertisement and on the lady's tiara, hint that Mineral Wells is the City of Light. What appears to be a coffee stain shows at the upper left. Someone has penciled "1905" in the upper right corner.
Date: 1906