Boyce Ditto Public Library - 173 Matching Results

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[The Damron Hotel Fire, 2 of 21: View South/Southeast ]

Description: The Colonial Hotel was built in 1906 by Mr. J. T. Holt for his second wife. Mr. Holt also owned a hardware store on S. Oak at the back of the hotel. The name of the hotel was changed to The Damron Hotel around 1917 when Mr. Holt traded it to Agnew and Bessie Damron. A hardware store, hard by, was sold to Mr. Holt's manager, John Davidson. The Damron Hotel, located at 109 W. Hubbbard Street, along with Davidson Hardware, burned completely on December 22, 1975. Please note the Christmas decoration, symbol of the season, on the telephone pole above the fire truck. The main entrance to the hotel is faintly visible through the dense smoke to the rear of the fire truck. The Crazy Hotel can be seen at the lower left edge of the picture.
Date: December 22, 1975

[The Damron Hotel Fire, 6 of 21: Bystanders Observing the Fire]

Description: The Damron Hotel was destroyed (on December 22, 1975) in a spectacular fire that received extensive photographic coverage. The hotel was located at 109 W. Hubbard. This is another picture of that immense conflagration. All the firemen answered a call that came in at 9:08 on the morning of the fire. The City of Weatherford also sent men and equipment over to help. Volunteers who were not themselves firemen also helped. Other buildings that suffered damage were Pemberton's (an appliance store across the street and west of the hotel), and the hardware store (Bought by Bob Sturtivant) next to the hotel. Note the height of the flames in this picture taken in the later stages of the fire.
Date: December 22, 1975

[The Damron Hotel Fire, 17 of 21: Two Individuals on the Street Northwest of the Fire]

Description: Shown here is another view of the plume of thick black smoke at the height of the fire that completely destroyed the Damron Hotel December 22, 1975, along with two hard-hatted individuals (presumably fire-fighters) standing in the street. It was a very popular hotel during the mineral water industry's heyday through the "Roaring Twenties", Great Depression and World War II. By the time of the fire, however, an informant remarked--verbally--that no respectable lady permitted herself to be found within a block of the hotel. Sic transit, it would appear, gloria mundi.
Date: December 22, 1975

[The Damron Hotel Fire, 19 of 21, Two People Looking South from North]

Description: The Damron Hotel was built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 during the heyday of Mineral Wells as a popular resort city. It burned completely on December 22, 1975. This picture shows the front entrance under a dark plume of black smoke, with flames breaking through the upper floors of the front wall. Two people (one with a hard hat, and one without)stand observing the proceedings.
Date: December 22, 1975

[Art Weaver 's Studio]

Description: This is a photograph of the 400 block of North Oak Avenue, showing various storefronts including Art Weaver Photography (412 North Oak Avenue), adjacent to and right of the Grand theater (formerly the Crazy Theater). The Baker Hotel is in the background on the skyline at the far right of the picture. The street is not really curved--it is the lens of the camera that took the photograph that makes it look so.
Date: 1975~
Creator: Weaver, A. F.
Location Info:

[The Damron Hotel Fire, 11 of 21: Fighting the Fire on W. Hubbard St.]

Description: Shown here is another picture in the series of photographs of the fire that destroyed the Damron Hotel during the holiday season of 1975. This smoke-shrouded scene of W. Hubbard, shows the front entrance to the hotel in the earlier stages of the fire's progress. The Damron was built in 1906, during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort spa. It burned completely on December 22,1975. The hotel's name was changed in 1917 when Mr. Holt (who had built the hotel) traded it to Agnew and Bessie Damron. It was a very popular hotel through the "Roaring Twenties", the Great Depression and World War II.
Date: December 22, 1975

[The Damron Hotel Fire, 15 of 21: Passenger Cars on a Back Street]

Description: The Damron Hotel, built in 1906 during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort spa, burned completely on December 22, 1975. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard Street. This picture shows the dense cloud of smoke that resulted from the holiday catastrophe. Westbound traffic on .S. Highway 180 had to be re-routed in order to avoid the clutter of debris that littered the street.
Date: December 22, 1975

[The Austin Well]

Description: This photograph shows the Austin Well as it was in 1974. A legend on the back of photograph reads: "Looking south shows remains of Austin Well in the foreground with the remains of what used to be the crystal plant. Across the street may be seen the St Regis box plant." The former Crazy Water Crystal plant, at the left edge of the picture, is now [2009] the St. Regis box factory This well is associated with a unique and romantic history: It was dug by a Mr. Austin, who claimed to have "Sore eyes", so that he had difficulty riding a horse. The horse, however, faithfully led him to a well where Mr. Austin soothed his eyes. He saw improvement after six weeks; and moved to Mineral Wells, where he drilled a well of his own. A cowboy rode a blind mare into Mineral Wells and auctioned her off for a dollar and a half. Mr. Austin acquired the horse, and put her to work drawing water from the well by turning a wheel to which was attached a rope, which with each revolution of the wheel, pulled a bucket of water from the well to ground level. Nellie was trained to pause at a point in her circular route long enough for the bucket to be emptied, then continue on to pull up the next bucket when it was filled. Blind Nellie was retired in her old age, but continued to walk a similar circular route in the pasture to which she was retired, pausing in each revolution, as before, until her death in 1912. Texas Packaging Company, Incorporated, has occupied the box plant since 1980.
Date: 1974

[Jarmon Alvis Lynch and Wife]

Description: A photograph of Jarmon Alvis Lynch and his wife, taken October 1, 1977. He was the grandson J. A. Lynch, the founder of Mineral Wells. He is shown standing on the steps of the Rock School House (in Mineral Wells)in this 1977 photograph, and holding his drawing of the Lynch cabins, which also shows the drilling rig his grandfather used to dig the first mineral well.
Date: October 1, 1977
Creator: Weaver, A. F.

[The Colonel Boykin Home - 1301 SE 4th Avenue]

Description: The Colonel Boykin Home, at 1301 SE 4th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas appears to show neo-classical elements, along with evidence of later remodeling. This home was built in 1905 by Colonel Walter H. Boykin, owner of the Fairfield Inn. It was later purchased by William Whipple Johnson who, with his brother, Harvey, originally developed the coal mines in Thurber, Texas. Johnson opened the Rock Creek Mine in far western Parker County (after selling the mines at Thurber) and lived in this home while he operated it. The Will Smith family owned the house during the 1930's The house was converted to a rooming house during World War II, and abandoned in later years. The abandoned house was bought in 1975 by Morris Wayne Garrett and his wife, Darlene. They salvaged artifacts from several historical buildings in Mineral Wells that were in the process of being demolished: A beveled-glass door from the old Miller Hotel, large claw-footed bathtubs from the Jerome Hotel, French doors and tall windows from the old Firemen's club at Lake Mineral Wells, and baluster rails which were once part of the Hexagon Hotel. Such were their efforts to restore the home to its former grandeur.
Date: June 1974

[402 SW 5th Street]

Description: A Victorian-era home (in Queen Anne style) is shown here, at 402 SW 5th Street. Please note the one-story tower, the multiple hip roofs and intersecting gables (Which are characteristic of the style) and wraparound porch (Which is less so). The columns on the porch suggest a Free Classic sub-type, but other elements of the sub-type appear to be missing. Cut-away bays (common in Queen Anne architecture) are also missing, all of which suggest that this house had been remodeled sometime in the past.
Date: June 1974

[The Old Katie Ware Home, 911 North. Oak]

Description: The old Katie Ware Home is also shown here. The style appears to be Queen Anne, Free Classic sub-style but it shows signs of extensive remodeling. Note the slightly unusual polygonal tower, and the front porch (which also serves as a car-port) that is level with the ground. It was located at 911 N. Oak Street. The photograph was taken taken during June of 1974.
Date: June 1974
Creator: Weaver, A. F.

[The Old Katie Ware Home , 911 North Oak] Avenue

Description: The old Katie Ware Home, of Queen Anne Style, shows possible remodeling. Please note the slightly unusual octagonal tower. Also note the front porch, level with the ground. The building was located at 911 N. Oak Avenue. It has since [2008] been demolished. The picture was taken on taken June of 1974. The picture shows the home from the front.
Date: June 1974
Creator: Weaver, A. F.

[612 NW 6th Street]

Description: This photograph of 612 N. W. 6th Street was taken on the Fourth of July, 1975. The house was built in 1905 by W. S. McCutcheon. The house has been owned and occupied from that time to the present time (2006) by Gil Hull. The local parish of the Episcopal Church held meetings in the basement that members lovingly called "the Catacombs." St. Luke's Episcopal Church is located next door on a lot donated by the McCutcheons. The style of the house is tentatively determined to be Neo-classical. It shows evidence of extensive remodeling. An earlier photograph is pictured on page 140 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver.
Date: July 4, 1975
Creator: Weaver, A. F.

[416 NW 6th Street]

Description: Shown here is a photograph of the front and west side of a multi-story Queen Anne-style, cement-block house located at 416 NW 6th Street in Mineral Wells, Texas. It has many architectural features displaying the sub-type Patterned Masonry, such as the shaped parapets on the tower, and on the gables, as well as the Palladian window on the tower. The rectangular tower is unusual. Although it is not obvious in this photograph, there are more than the normal number of chimneys. The house is said to have a fireplace in each room--each one of which was unique. The fireplaces are said to have been faced with Italian marble. A picture in the "Daily Mineral Index" (that is thought to be contemporary with the house) shows another, frontal view, which also displays a conservatory, not visible in this photograph.
Date: June 1975
Creator: Weaver, A. F.
Location Info: