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ABOUT BROWSE FEED
[A House in Mineral Wells]
Writing on the side of the negative reads: "Vance Villa, Jan. 10, 1919, Mineral Wells." (The 1914 Mineral Wells City Directory lists Vance Villa at 811 N. College, which is now NW 5th Avenue. Mineral Wells actually did have a school in the 1890's, located at the corner of 5th Avenue and Hubbard Street.) This picture is one of 17 (4"X4") negatives that were found in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069) and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. It is postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975." Some telephone numbers and the remark: "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)" also appeared on the envelope.
[A Letter from Mrs. William Wehunt to A.F. Weaver]--dated to about 2002
The letter shown is from "Mrs. William Wehunt", who was the former Katherine Brookshire, whose father owned a furniture store in Mineral Wells. The bank referred to in the letter is believed to have been the Bank of Mineral Wells, that failed in 1924. It had been Mineral Wells' first bank. The Brookshire family of Mineral Wells is believed to be distantly related to the founder of the chain of Brookshire grocery stores.
[A Hill With Power Poles]
This picture was taken from one of 17 (4"X4") negatives that were contained in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography and postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975." Also on the envelope are some telephone numbers and a remark: "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield.) This picture is taken from East Mountain, Mineral Wells, looking east along NE 4th Street. The ruins of a foundation of a building seen at the end of the street about half-way up the hill was the Chautauqua, completed in 1905 and demolished about 1912. The lookout tower at the top of the mountain was blown away by a tornado in 1930. There is a sign below the crest of the mountain (It appears to proclaim the "Young Photo Garden", which was located at 309 N. Oak Avenue)approximately in the place where the "Welcome" sign was erected in 1922. The Jaycees (Junior Chamber of Commerce) built a youth center on this site in the 1970's, that is still standing at the present time [2008]. Several unidentified people are also to be seen in the photograph.
[The Fire at the Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building]
The Sangcura-Sprudel Well, located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue, was built around 1900. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, and the porches were enclosed. It was then re-modeled into a rooming house. The building burned down on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells.
[The Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building Fire]
The original Sangcura Sprudel Company was located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue. The original building was built by George McAtee. It was sold to Bert Gibson of Gibson Wells Water Company in 1908, and later passed into the possession of the Crazy Well Water Company. It maintained a large pavilion, dance hall and skating rink for several seasons. It--evidently just the house portion--was later moved to 314 N.W. 5th Street. The porches were enclosed, and it was converted into a rooming house. The building burned on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells.
[A Charter for the Interurban Road and Street Car Line]
The Mineral Wells Electric System operated two electric street cars in the city of Mineral Wells from 1907 to 1913; one on Hubbard Streeet from NE 17th Avenue to SW 6th Avenue (later part of the Bankhead Highway), and one on Oak Avenue from NE 17th Street to SE 11th Street, thence Southwest to Elmhurst Park. However, two gasoline-powered 70 passenger (all-passenger) motor cars were operated by the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railroad (WMW&NW) between Graford, Mineral Wells, Ft. Worth and Dallas from 1912 to 1935. An electric interurban line was not built. The second part of this notice--the Army-Navy Sanitarium--was never approved by Congress.
[The Casino at Elmhurst Park]
This is a picture of the Casino, which was once located at Elmhurst Park, and illustrated on page 187 of A. F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", Second Edition, 1988. Note: this is an early photograph, taken during or shortly after its construction. In later pictures, watch towers have been added to the pylons framing the front entrance.
[The Mineral Wells Annual Fair]
Typewritten on the back of the photograph (probably by A.F. Weaver)is: "We attended the Mineral Wells annual fair at the Dance Pavilion at Elmhurst Park." The photograph is probably a copy of an earlier image.
The Famous Water Pavilion--Damron Hotel
The Famous Water Wells maintained a pavilion in the lobby of the Damron Hotel, where guests could partake of mineral water. This hotel was located on the corner of W. Hubbard Street and SW 1st Street. It burned down in 1975.
The Right Ticket
An old advertisement for Mineral Wells, touting the "pleasures" to be had in the city. The lady's crown displays the legend "Health & Pleasure." The "Pleasures" obtainable in the city need not be discussed, as they are plainly describedd in the picture, which may be found on page 91 of the second edition of A. F. Weaver's book, "Time Was..."
[The Crazy Well Bath House]
This photograph was used in A. F. Weaver's 1st edition of "Time Was..." on page 16. His description: "This street scene taken in 1918 showing a drug store on the corner, the bath house next door and then the Crazy Flats north of the bath house. The Crazy Hotel sits just to the West of the drug store. The fire of 1925 March 15th started in the drug store and burned the whole block." (The first Crazy Hotel is not visible in this picture.) Please note the Hexagon Hotel in the distance on the left side of the street. The building across the street with the tower at the right edge of the picture is the Vichy Well and Natatorium, later The Beach, and then The Standard Well.
[The Hexagon Hotel]
The popular Hexagon Hotel, built in 1897, was the first structure in Mineral Wells to be electrically-lit. Electricity was supplied by a DC power plant next door. It was located at 701 N. Oak, and was torn down September 1959. This photograph is found on page 177 of "Time Was.." 2nd Ed. by A. F. Weaver.
[A Man With a plow]
A note on back of photograph states that it shows preparation for paving the brick highway from Mineral Wells to Millsap. The note contains the name D. M. Shrum, but does not indicate that it is the person in the photograph. The brick highway to Millsap was part of the nation's first transcontinental highway, the Bankhead highway, from mile zero in Washington, D.C. to San Diego in California. It was built through Mineral Wells in about 1921.
Bank of Mineral Wells
This picture is an undated photograph that appears to have been published in the Mineral Wells Index. It also appears on page 148 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells." The caption reads, "Palo Pinto County Boys' and Girls' Poultry Clubs and the Junior Rotary Band received pure-bred eggs distributed free by the Bank of Mineral Wells. Note the bank has had an addition to its south side." The caption on an earlier picture of the bank states, "D. M. Howard and R. B. Preston opened the first bank in the City, The Bank of Mineral Wells, located at 102 SE 1st Avenue." In a companion picture on p. 148, "TIME WAS ... ", the caption reads,"The Bank of Mineral Wells went broke in 1924. The building was then used by Ball Drug and Massengale's Appliances. The building was torn down to make room for parking in the downtown area." (The City Directory of 1924 lists the bank's location at 102 SE 1st. Avenue. There is no listing of it in the 1927 City Directory.)
[The Gem Theatre Band]
The Woodward Family Band (although the sign on the drum says "Gem Theater Band") is shown standing in front of The Gem Theater,once located at 201 NE 1st Avenue in Mineral Wells. The film "The Diamond From the Sky" was playing at the time the photograph was taken [about 1915]. This film starred Lottie Pickford, sister to Mary Pickford.
[A Scene at auction of First Edition of TIME WAS]
Attendants at an auction of the First Edition of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells" shown here, are, left to right: Mrs. Richard Warren;, Mrs. Morris Thompkins; Mrs. A.F. (Patsy) Weaver; Mr. A.F. Weaver, Author; Rev. Bobby Moore; Auctioneer.
[The Gibson Well]
The Gibson Well was located on the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue. In 1888, the label on a bottle of "Natural Gibson Well Water" boasted cures for "constipation, rheumatism, female complaints, nervousness, calculi, stomach, liver, kidney & bladder disorders." Please note the crossing of the "WMW&NW RR" tracks and the "Dinky Car" tracks in the left foreground of the picture.
A Jinricksha
Notes that accompany the photograph read: "Picture taken near the top of the thousand steps which used to climb East Mountain up NE 3rd Street. Path can still be seen going up the side of the mountain at this point." The souvenir picture was taken in the 1930's, and is believed to have been taken at the photographer's cabin, where the winding donkey trail formerly crossed the steps.
[A Park Gathering]
Three unknown men and seven unknown women gather in a park in front of the Gibson Well Drinking Pavilion in the early part of the twentieth century--presumably by the appearance of their clothes. Please observe the parasol that the lady on the right front is holding. The pavilion was located in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue, a site now occupied by the First Christian Church. The exact date of the photograph is unknown.
[People in the Front of the Nazareth Hospital]
A group of people, including a priest, three nuns and Mother Superior, standing in front of the Nazareth Hospital. For details about the Nazareth Hospital, please see: "Nazareth Hospital, 25th Anniversary, 1931-1956."
[The Yeager Building - Mineral Wells, Texas]
The Yeager Building, located on the southwest corner of NE 1st Street and NE 1st Avenue is shown here. Concrete lettering in the gable atop the building (barely visible in the photograph)identifies it as "YEAGER BLOCK". The building once had a metal lion mounted atop it, giving rise to the story that the business was named "The Lion Drug." Descendants of Dr. Yeager do not recall the place's ever having that name. A casual reference to the building in 1912 gives it as "The Lion Drug", however. The metal lion met its fate by being donated for scrap in a drive for metal during World War II.
Service Club, Camp Wolters, Texas
An illustration of the Service Club at Camp Wolters, which was located just outside Mineral Wells, Texas is shown here. Once the largest Infantry Replacement Training Center during World War II, Camp [later Fort] Wolters was re-opened during the Korean Conflict, and again during the Vietnam War. This portrait of the service club is probably a photograph taken from an old picture postcard.
[The Auction of the First Edition of TIME WAS In Mineral Wells]
This photograph shows the purchaser who bought the first copy of "Time Was in Mineral Wells", and his wife. Left to right are: Rev. Bobby Moore, auctioneer; Jack Dickens, purchaser; A.F. Weaver, author; Mrs. Jean Dickens. Copy Number One sold for $153.57. (H. Arthur Zappe D.D.S., bought copy Number Two for $45, and Bill Bennett bought copy Number Three for an undisclosed price.)
[A Street Scene: Highways 281 and 180]
A picture, looking north on US Highway 281 from NW 1st Street to its intersection with US highway 180 (Hubbard Street). The first building on the right is Lynch Plaza, the location of the discovery of the mineral water well that gave Mineral Wells its name and made it the leading health spa in the state. Other businesses are: Cole's Florist on the west (left) corner of the block opposite Lynch Plaza, Poston's Dry goods (the low building in middle of block north of Cole's), First State Bank on the corner north of Lynch Plaza. The Crazy Hotel can be seen in the distance; three blocks up the street on the left. Oak Street was widened, with turn lanes, in 2005.
[The Casino at Elmhurst Park , 1of 3]
The Casino, facing the lake at Elmhurst Park. For further details, please consult the other pictures in the series.
[The Mineral Wells Convention Hall and the Hexagon Hotel]
The Hexagon was the first electrically-lighted hotel in Mineral Wells. The Convention Hall was built, in part, on the foundation of the Hexagon's DC power plant. The Convention Hall was built for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention, which was held in 1925.
First State Bank & Trust Company
The First State Bank and Trust Company and the Oxford Hotel were located at the corner of Oak and Hubbard Streets. The building burned in 1983. It is now the site of the Lynch Building and Plaza, the site of the first discovered mineral water well in Mineral Wells.
[Mineral Wells High School's First Graduating Class, 1903]
Shown in this picture are, from left to right: Maggie McDaniel, Annabel Cushman, Myra Hunt Oliver and (Valedictorian) Ferdinand "Doc" Howard. The title of his valedictory address was "The Electrical Age." The diplomas were presented by Judge F.C. Highsmith. This photograph is to be found in the second edition of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver on page 189.
Stamps & Phillipt [sic] Demonstrating Their Automobile
Stamps and Phillips, inventors, demonstrating their Storm Alarm invention. Note that "Phillips" is spelled with one "l" and a "t" on the hand-written caption. The car is sitting in front of the second Carlsbad drinking pavilion on W. Watts Street (now NW 4th Street.) The photograph was taken during the 1920's.
Laying the Cornerstone of the Post Office
Shown here is the laying the cornerstone of the Post Office at 201 NE 2nd Street on May 13, 1912. The Chautauqua is at the upper left corner of the picture, and the Cliff House Hotel is visible in the upper middle of the picture. Buildings on the right side of the picture were situated on the east side of Mesquite Street (now NE 1st Avenue). Buildings on the far right of the picture were once located where the Baker Hotel now [2008] stands. Early automobiles and horse-drawn carriages also appear in the picture. The photographer appears to have been standing on the north side of NE 2nd Street, looking east. A holograph inscription above and below the picture cannot be read.
[The Crazy Well]
This picture was taken in 1974, looking south on NW 1st Avenue from NW 4th Street, showing the metal cover, in the sidewalk corner, of the Crazy Well. It is full of Crazy water, ready to be pumped out and used. The building on the left is the west side of the present [2008] Crazy Water Retirement Hotel. This information was taken from Art Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...", page 29. This well was the third one dug in Mineral Wells.
[The Hexagon Hotel Stairwell]
This picture shows the staircase in the Hexagon Hotel taken from the top floor. A view of the first-floor lobby can be seen at the lower middle of the picture with the stairs spiraling from floor to floor down to it. A writer in the Palo Pinto County Star (Mineral Wells, Tex.) in 1966 remarked that "[A]s one entered the lobby once could see the stairways as they encircled each floor giving a gallery effect." See also: "Hexagon Hotel [with history]" for further details.
[People Sitting in a car]
This photograph, looking west on East Hubbard at the corner of NE lst Avenue, shows a touring car, with two men in front and three women behind. Please note the trolley car tracks in front of the car. They are almost covered with dirt and no longer in use. This photograph, taken about 1915, may be found on page 137 of Art Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells."
[The Crazy Theatre--With a Car]
This photograph may be found in A. F. Weaver's Book, "Time Was...", 2nd edition, on page 17. It is captioned "Crazy Theater, 400 North Oak Avenue, photo around 1918."
[A Gazebo in West Park]
A gazebo, built during the 1970-1980's era, is visible through the trees in West City Park. The park is located on US highway 180 (Hubbard Street) where Pollard Creek crosses it--west of downtown Mineral Wells, Texas.
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 11 of 11: Partially Demolished]
The second First Baptist Church building was built in 1920, and used until 1967. It was demolished to build the third and current church on the same site. Please see photograph number 1 for details.
[The Crazy Water Crystal Factory]
Shown here is an interior view of the Crazy Crystals Plant. "Crazy Water" was evaporated, and the dissolved solids precipitated as crystals which were then packaged and shipped all over the United States, Canada, England and Australia. By dissolving the Crazy Water crystals in water, the purchaser was able to reconstitute "mineral water" and secure the benefits of one of the earliest "instant" beverages without the added cost of the supplying company's shipping water.
[Poston's Dry Goods - 1 of 15: Will Poston]
Will Poston is shown standing in the cashier's station of his department store, Poston Dry Goods (located at 107 N. Oak Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas). Note the conveyor system by which the cashier received cash and statements from various departments, and distributed change and receipts. Central cashiers were common in department stores from the years of the Great Depression through the time of World War II.
[The Crazy Bottling Plant]
The Crazy Water Bottling Plant and Crazy Water Tower are shown here. The plant was built in 1919 at a cost of $85,000, and is located at 300 NW 7th Street. The location was once the original site of the Sangcura-Sprudel Wells Pavilion. The Sangcura-Sprudel Pavilion was moved and converted into a rooming house, which burned in 1973. Notice the home in the background. The date on back of photograph is given as 1940.
[The First Crazy Hotel]
This picture shows the front of the first Crazy Hotel, which was destroyed by fire March 15, 1925. Built in two stages and joined together, the first (back) section was built in 1912, and the second (front) section was completed in 1914. A handwritten note on back of photograph states, "Crazy Hotel 1913. Front of Hotel Facing South Mineral Wells, Tx." This picture is included on page 15 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS...", and was probably taken before the second section of the hotel opened for business. The back of Crazy Flats (the second Crazy Water Drinking Pavilion) can be seen to the right, north of and behind the hotel in this picture.
[Poston's Dry Goods, 5 of 15: View of Safe]
Will Poston sits next to the safe in Poston Dry Goods store in 1975. Note the lettering on the safe "Baker, Poston and Co." Also note the many ledger books, which contained the numerous accounts and records required by the store's manual bookkeeping system, around Mr. Poston. Poston's was the largest apparel store in Mineral Wells after the Howard Brothers Department Stores discontinued operations. Many of the glass show cases in Poston's had come from the earlier Howards' store.
[The Crazy Water Well--1974]
The original Crazy Woman's Well is preserved under the sidewalk at the northwest corner of the Crazy Hotel. This is the well the mentally-challenged (or the once-designated "Crazy woman") drank from that "cured" her dementia. Although not used for years, the well probably only requires a pump to resume production. Printed on the back of this picture is "The Crazy Well as today", and stamped "Mar. 21, 1974."
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 1 of 11: Wood Pile and Building]
The third building of the First Baptist Church was built in 1920; it was used until 1967, at which time it was demolished for the current building. The First Baptist church was originally located in a frame building on the southwest corner of the Crazy block in 1883. A second church was built at the corner of SW 4th Avenue and West Hubbard Street, facing SW 4th Avenue. It was a frame building with two steeples. A brick church, facing Hubbard Street, was erected to accommodate the congregation in 1920. These photographs illustrate the demolition of this building. The present church was erected in 1967 at the corner of SW 4th Avenue and SW 1st Street.
[The Building of the Baker Hotel]
Construction of the Baker HOTEL. [sic], which opened on November 22nd,1929 It was the work of Wyatt C. Hendricks, and Company, Architects. The building cost $1.2 million dollars to construct, of which Mineral Wells residents raised $150,000 towards it. A legend on the back of the photograph states: "Unknown man looks on. Photograph taken approximately from site of Methodist church, looking towards the southwest."
[A Train Depot]
George and Daurice O'Neil purchased the depot,and their son Don helped with the restoration. It is now [2008] used as office rental. Elliot & Waldron Title Company and Gault, Attorney-at-Law, are leasing space there. The building is listed on the National registry in Washington [D.C.] and it sports a Texas Historical Marker. It is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 190.
D. M. Howard Merchant
A view of the D.M. Howard store is shown here. It was located at 101 SE First Avenue. D.M. Howard was one of five brothers to come to Mineral Wells from North Carolina. D.M. Howard died on January 23 (a Saturday), 1910 at his home, following an operation for appendicitis. This building was occupied by J. M. Belcher (a furniture dealer)for many years after it had ceased to be the D.M. Howard store, and then by the R.& W Furniture store. It was eventually torn down in 1975 to make room for the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan--and for parking. This picture is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 122.
[A Man, A Woman and a Portrait]
Ruby Shattles (Mrs. Jesse Shattles) presents a portrait of Achilles Corcanges to Mr. Corcanges, founder & owner of radio station KORC in Mineral Wells. Mrs. Shattles owned and operated Pavilion Studios at 412 North Oak. This picture may be found in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 185.
[Thelma Doss Interviews Claude Gardner]
Thelma Doss interviews the writer Claude Garner on KORC Radio. Looking on are (left) W. Lions; (center) Corcanges [founder & owner of the station]; (right)Orval Shore. KORC radio broadcast first on December 5, 1946. Its name was changed to KJSA-AM in 1973. This picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 185.
Baker Hotel Swimming Pool
No Description Available.
[Palo Pinto General Hospital]
Palo Pinto General Hospital opened in 1970 and is located west of Mineral Wells. It has been, since this picture was taken, enlarged and remodeled extensively. This hospital replaced the downtown Nazareth Hospital. While the hospital was been built, the first two floors of the Crazy Water Hotel was used as a hospital. This picture is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 168.