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Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 16: Historic
This volume includes photographs of local citizens, pictures of the Possum Kingdom dam, and a record of a visit to the Fort from [then] Senator Lyndon B. Johnson.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 22: Enlisted Photos
This volume contains photographs of enlisted personnel. It features ceremonies, promotions, and awards.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 21: Visitors
This volume includes photographs of visitors to Fort Wolters. Images include Dwight D. Eisenhower, Lyndon B. Johnson, several generals, and assorted dignitaries.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 23: Miscellaneous
This volume includes photographs of ceremonies, cake cuttings, recreational events, holidays, and other activities.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 15: U.S. Army Hospital, Army Nurses, Beach Army Hospital, American Red Cross, Grey Ladies, Red Cross Volunteers, Dental Clinic
This volume includes photographs of the U.S. Army Hospital, Army Nurses, the Beach Army Hospital, the American Red Cross, the Grey Ladies, Red Cross Volunteers, and the Dental Clinic.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 17: Aircraft Airports
This volume includes photographs of the Mineral Wells Municipal Airport, maps, illustrations of aircraft, and articles on the Whirlybird, the Bell H-13 Helicopter, the OH-23 Raven the H-23D, the TH-55A Osage and the Hover Simulator.
[Poston's Dry Goods, 8 of 15: Royal Society Display Case]
The Royal Society embroidery and tatting thread display case with its owner, Will Poston standing next to it, is shown in the photograph. Poston Dry Goods stood at 107 N. Oak Avenue, in Mineral Wells, Texas.
[Crazy Water Company Railroad Cars]
Men are shown here loading boxes of Crazy Crystals onto railroad boxcars. Crazy Water Crystals were shipped nationwide in response to demand created by radio advertising. This scene is typical of the activity required to load boxcars to meet the demand for "instant Mineral Water." Printed on back of the photograph is: "Loading Crazy Crystals 1930."
[Crazy Crystals]
Men and women are shown here packaging Crazy Water Crystals. Mineral water was evaporated, and the resulting crystal deposits were gathered and packaged in various sizes for shipment throughout the United States. Written on back of this photograph is: "Pkg Crazy Crystals 1930's" and the name "Buster."
THE CRAZY RADIO GANG
The Crazy Radio Gang broadcast music on the Texas Quality Network Monday through Friday at 12:45 P.M. Pictured are: HAL H. COLLINS "One Man's Opinion", FRANK DINKINS "Dink", FRANCIS QUINN "February", FRANK McCORDIE "Great Lover" JOHNNY JORDAN "Uncle Oscar", CONRAD BRADY Master of Ceremonies, GUY WOODWARD "Curly", MAURICE PENDERY "Brother Pink Nose", DALE WOODWARD "Pee Wee", JACK AMLUNG "Musical Director", SUGAR CANE and February (in black face). Hal Collins was the manager of the Crazy Hotel in the early 1930's when a salesman convinced him that he could sell a boxcar-load of "Crazy Water Crystals" a week if he would advertise them on the new-fangled radio. The broadcasts originated in the lobby of the Crazy Hotel, and became popular beyond all expectations. Orders for the mineral water crystals filled many carloads per week, and they were shipped to all areas of the country. Demand was so great that it exceeded the capacity of the crystallizing plant. A second source of mineral water was found, but it did not match the original patented composition. The company never fully recovered from the heavy fine levied on it by the Food and Drug Administration in the early 1930's.
[The Demolition of the First Baptist Church, 9 of 11: Workers]
Workers are shown helping to demolish the First Baptist Church building in 1967. It was built in 1920. The current building is the third First Baptist Church built on this site. Please see photograph number 1 for details.
Methodist Church - Baker Gardens - East Mountain
This photograph appears to be taken from a picture post-card, which includes the old Methodist Church, the Baker Hotel Garden, the Baker Water Storage Building, and the Welcome Sign on East Mountain. It is a rare view. The home of Druggist Dr. C. F. Yeager on NE 2nd Street in the picture was still standing at the time of this picture. During construction of his Hotel, Mr. Baker visited Hot Springs, Arkansas; and he was so impressed with the Arlington Hotel that he stopped building construction, and moved the hotel a block further west. He converted the basement, already built, into a swimming pool (only the second hotel known to have a pool at the time), and an underground laundry. The Methodist church has since been rebuilt, the water storage building has been removed, and the "Welcome" sign has been relocated further east to greet visitors from its new location overlooking Elmwood Cemetery.
[Crazy Fiz]
Products were developed to satisfy the public's search for health during the heyday of the Mineral Wells Health Industry. One of these was Crazy Fiz. Carbon dioxide was infused into mineral water under pressure to create a "Sparkling water" drink labeled "Crazy Fiz." The women in this photograph of the Crazy Water Crystal plant are packaging the Crazy Fiz for distribution. On the back of the photograph is printed "Crazy Fiz 1930's."
[The Second Crazy Water Well Drinking Pavilion]
The small building seen at the right of this picture was the First Crazy Well Drinking Pavilion. The large structure in the center of the picture is an early view of the second Pavilion, which was built in 1900. This picture was taken before its first two floors were enclosed. The Carlsbad pavilion, which was built around 1895 (across NW 1st Avenue and west of the Crazy) also appears in several pictures of the area around this time. Its absence in this photograph is probably the result of a combination of perspective, angle of picture, and depth-of-view of the camera. The Second Pavilion (shown in this photograph) was replaced in 1909 by the Crazy Flats, which burned in the fire of 1925. The current Crazy Hotel opened in 1927, and occupies the entire city block. It is now [2003] a retirement home.
[A District Baptist Meeting]
This is a picture taken by A.F. Weaver during the District Baptist Meeting of 1964, held at the high school football stadium on the west side of town. Miller Stadium, where this photograph was taken, has been replaced by a new one at the High School complex on the east side of town as of March, 2008.
Hal Collins
The name "Hal Collins", manager of the Crazy Hotel in the early 1930's, is printed on the back of this photograph, as well as his autograph on the face. He was convinced that by advertising on the new medium, radio, that he could sell a boxcar-load of Crazy Water Crystals each week. As a result, the "Crazy Gang" began broadcasting from the lobby of the Crazy Hotel over the Texas Quality Network. The noon broadcast became so popular that the sponsor was shipping, not one but several, carloads of Crazy Water Crystals per week to a nationwide audience of devoted listeners. Weatherford's Mary Martin got her start in show business on the program where she became known as "Crazy Mary."
[The Crazy Crystal Bottling Plant]
A picture of the interior of the Crazy Bottling Plant, ladies are shown bottling Crazy Fiz, a copyrighted beverage created by infusing cooled mineral water with carbon dioxide. The men shown here appear to be checking the process in preparation for the bottling of the Crazy Fiz, while the ladies bottle and crate the finished product for shipment. Note the plant's scrupulous cleanliness, and the fact that all employees are dressed in white.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 1: Infantry Replacement Training Center
This volume includes a time-line of events that took place in Fort Wolters from 1921 to 1973, including biographies of personnel, photographs, diagrams and a Roster of Infantry Replacement Center Officers from 1941.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 5: Military Personnel: Awards, Promotions, Retirements
This volume consists of photographs of personnel receiving awards, promotions, and retirements.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 7: Heliports, Stagefields, Directory
This volume consists of photographs and diagrams of stage fields such as Sundance, Mustang, Rawhide, Da Nang, Phu Loi, Soc Trang, and many others. The U.S. Army Primary Helicopter School utilized approximately 1,350 square miles of airspace.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 9: Athletic Awards
This volume includes photographs showing personnel receiving trophies and other recognition for sports activities at the base, such as basketball, golf, softball, bowling, and other sports.
[A Bottle-Shaped Romantic Mineral Water Advertisement]
The interior of a bottle-shaped advertisement for mineral water is shown here. It claims romantic properties for the water. See also [Bottle-Shaped Mineral Water Ad] and [Bottle-Shaped Map of Attractions].
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 14: Officer Wives Club and NCO Wives Club Activities
This volume includes many photographs of the activities of the Fort Wolters' Officers' Wives Club, NCO Wives Club, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, and Teen Club.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 12: U.S. Army Security Agencies
This volume includes many photographs of personnel of the 316th, 303rd, 330th, and 311th Army Security Agency Battalions.
[Blind Nellie]
Blind Nellie was brought to Mineral Wells by a cowboy, who sold her at auction for a dollar and a half. She eventually came into the possession of Colonel W.R. Austin, who used her to turn the wheel of the pump at the Austin Well. In that capacity, the horse became a tourist attraction. When she was retired, she continued to walk in circles in her pasture. She was given a ceremonial burial when she died in 1912, a burial attended by a large crowd of admirers. The story may be found on page 54 of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." by A.F. Weaver. Written on the back of this photograph is "Blind Nellie at Austin Well located in the 900 block of N.E. 2nd Ave." This is clearly a photograph of a newspaper clipping.
Lovers Retreat
A photograph of a group of three men and four women pose in a hollow surrounded by vegetation. This former public park, on Eagle Creek four miles west of Palo Pinto, is known for the huge vine-covered boulders north of the creek, and for a lovely picnic area bordering the creek on the south side. A low dam near the downstream edge of the park formed a favorite early swimming and fishing area. A small pedestrian suspension bridge provided access to the rugged boulder-strewn playground. A large tabernacle provided venue for Sunday Services at one time, and also for the Palo Pinto County Old Settler's Reunions.
Texas Carlsbad Water
A group of people stand outside Texas Carlsbad Water. The Carlsbad was one of the earlier, and more popular drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells. It was located on NW 1st. Avenue, at NW 4th Street, directly across the street west of the Crazy Well. Its slogan was: Makes a man love HIS wife, Makes a woman love HER husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders. Please note the supports for possible electric lines, the unpaved street, and the horses obscurely visible at the far right of the photograph.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 13: Police, Fire, Training Aids, Band, Weather Squadron, Recreation, Prisoner of War Camp, Nike, Camp Wolters Enterprise, Parks
This volume includes a brief history (and many photographs) of Fort Wolters' 84th Military Police Detachment, Fire Department, Training Aids, 328th Army Band, Weather Squadron, Recreation, Prisoner of War Camp 1943-1945, Nike, Camp Wolters Enterprise, and Parks.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 10: Primary Helicopter School Training Curriculum for Officers and Candidates
This volume details the curriculum at the U.S. Army Primary Helicopter Training School. It includes a chart of training concepts, a school brigade organizational chart, and a description of the 16-week training course.
[The West Ward School, East (Front) View ]
The West Ward School, Mineral Wells' second public School, was built in 1902. It was located north of the old Rock School at 205 NW 5th Avenue. It served as both a High School and Elementary school until the East Ward School was built in 1906, and High School classes were moved there. The West Ward School was renamed the Houston Elementary School when the Mineral Wells High School was built in 1915. The building was torn down after a new Houston Elementary School was built in 1930.
[Newspaper Special - Rotary Convention, 1922]
A special "Rotary photogravure" edition for the Rotary Club Convention, Mineral Wells, that took place in 1922. The edition carries a panoramic view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain, and pictures of twenty Rotary officials and Convention Committee Chairmen. George Holmgren, District Governor (third from left), had Mineral Wells' WELCOME sign built in his San Antonio Iron Works, and donated it to the people of Mineral Wells that year.
[The Brick Factory]
The abundant clay in and around Palo Pinto County was recognized around the turn of the 20th century as a source of raw material for brick manufacturing. Rejected fine coal from the area's coal mines furnished heat to fire the clay and bake it into brick. This brick factory in far western Parker County, near the Rock Creek coal mine, was a major industry in Mineral Wells. The factory was first opened on January 21 of 1921. The factory is in full operation in this photograph, with train cars on the tracks and bricks stacked along the rail area awaiting shipment. Area-made bricks were used to build the seawall at Galveston after the disastrous hurricane of 1900, to pave both the highway from Mineral Wells to Ft. Worth as well as many of the streets in in that city, and to pave Congress Avenue in Austin.
[St. Mark's Lutheran Church - 9 of 18: Steps in Front of Church]
A view of the roof of St. Mark's Lutheran Church, as seen from the south. This view shows some of the rockwork landscaping on the south side of the church, located at 1201 SE 25th Avenue in Mineral Wells
[The Woodmen of the World -- 1905]
Mineral Wells was a popular convention city in its heyday. This photograph is part of the group attending a convention of the Woodmen of the World in Mineral Wells. The picture was taken around 1905 at the Texas Carlsbad Well, once located at 415 NW 1st Avenue.
[Drinking Pavilion in the Crazy Hotel]
A caption on the back of the photograph states, "This picture, taken in the 1930's, shows the drinking pavilion in the [lacuna] Crazy Hotel." Recognizable are Boyce Ditto, standing third from right; N.E. Adams, last on the right, standing reading a newspaper; and Mrs. Veale, mother of Cecil Young, seated on left. Many people came to Mineral Wells to bathe and to "Drink their way to health" at the many wells and pavilions that catered to the public. This drinking pavilion is still extant, just off the lobby of the "Crazy" (now [2008] a retirement home), but it no longer dispenses mineral water.
[The Women's Corps, Palo Pinto County Civil Defense]
The Women's Corp, Palo Pinto County Civil Defense. The photograph pictures 13 (unnamed) women, a young girl, and A. F. Weaver during a flag presentation. Mr. Weaver, a Ham Radio operator, set up the Palo Pinto County Civil Defense on October 1, 1972 and was the director for 26 years. Mr. Weaver was also the author of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", a photographic history, first published in 1975. The book was revised and published again in three subsequent editions.
The 112th Cavalry Band, Mineral Wells, Texas
The writing on the drum identifies this band as being associated with the 112th Cavalry, which was stationed in Mineral Wells, Texas. A National Guard Cavalry unit was established on West Mountain in 1919. This photograph appears to be taken in front of the cavalry stable sometime between World Wars I and II.
[The Crazy Water Crystals Plant]
One step in the conversion of Mineral Wells' "Crazy Water" into Crazy Water Crystals was to boil mineral water in open vats, in three different stages, until only the minerals were left. One worker is visible, monitoring the open vats. The crystals were then filtered out and dried, packaged and sold nationwide. The customer simply added water to the crystals to obtain one of America's early "instant" products: Mineral Wells' health-giving mineral water. The photograph was taken around 1930.
[A Mayor Being Pushed in a Wheelbarrow]
The visiting Mineral Wells High School football team had just defeated the Weatherford Kangaroos 21 to 6 in their annual football rivalry some time around 1940. The exact date of the event remains unknown as of 2013. Mayor George Barber of Mineral Wells, is enjoying a victor's ride, supplied by the Mayor of Weatherford, across the football field at Weatherford Stadium. The wheelbarrow, used in payment of the wager between rival mayors, is decorated for this purpose. Such whimsical wagering (and the high jinks that accompany the pay-off) is common in Texas High School football.
Nazareth Hospital 25th Anniversary 1931-1956
We have here a copy of the cover of a booklet marking the 25th anniversary (1931 - 1956) of Mineral Well's Nazareth Hospital. The brochure contains pictures of the religious, medical, nursing and administrative staff, with interior scenes of departments, patients and equipment. The Mineral Wells Clinic was built soon after the current Crazy Hotel opened in 1927 to replace the Crazy Flats that burned in 1925. In 1931 the Holy Sisters of the Nazareth purchased the 46-bed facility for $135,000 and moved into the top floor of the building to live and minister to the patients. The hospital was closed in the mid 'sixties. The hospital was temporarily moved to the Crazy Hotel until the present [2009] hospital was built.
[Crazy Sign]
This picture, looking east with the Baker Hotel in the background, of the Crazy Hotel sign was colorized by Mr. A.F. Weaver. The Crazy Sign was constructed in 1933 in the center of Mineral Wells and spanned Hubbard Street (US 180) at its intersection with Oak Avenue It was quite a landmark, as it was one of only two signs allowed by the Texas Department of Transportation to cross a highway maintained by the State. The sign was torn down on December 24, 1958. The urgency of its removal during the Holiday Season was never explained; nor was it ever quite understood by the general public. It was sold for scrap some time later.
[Lovers Retreat]
Lovers' Retreat has been called one of the most scenic spots in Texas. This popular picnic spot, located on Eagle Creek north of US Highway 180 (four miles west of Palo Pinto, and south of the creek) was used for many years for camp meetings, and the annual Palo Pinto Old Settlers Reunion. This photograph shows some of the huge boulders in the area north of Eagle Creek, which were accessible from the picnic area by a suspension foot-bridge that spanned a popular swimming and fishing hole. This spectacular recreation area is currently [2007] on private property, and no longer accessible to the public.
[Downtown Park]
This photograph shows one of several city parks maintained by the ladies of Mineral Wells. Some pictures identify one or the other of these parks as "Wylie Park." It may be that the separate parks on vacant lots throughout the town were all part of a civic "Wylie Park" program. The Cannas here are quite tall. Brick work edging of the flower beds kept the grass from invading the garden.
Living Room in Home Econmics.
This picture shows the living room in the Lillian Peek Home Economics Building at Mineral Wells' High School. The Peek cottage was built by the W.P.A. in 1937, and was the first free-standing Home Economics classroom/laboratory in the State of Texas. It is now the property of the Fifty Year Club, and is leased to the Creative Arts Center Studio/Workshop of the Mineral Wells Art Club. Note the construction of the false fireplace with its fire brick lining, which was typical of stucco home construction in the 1930's and 1940's.
PALOCADE Palo Pinto County
Palo Pinto County celebrated 100 years of existence in 1957. Shown here is a picture of the cover of the official program of the pageant that commemorated this milestone in the county's history. Palo Pinto County began with its formation by act of the Texas legislature in 1856, and its subsequent organization in 1857. As part of the year-long centennial observance, a pageant noting significant events in the county's past was presented at the local football stadium. The program itself contains 28 pages of tidbits of history about people, places and events in the county's heritage, along with a schedule of events organized by the official Centennial Committee.
[The Palo Pinto County Courthouse]
This picture illustrates Palo Pinto County's third Courthouse, completed in 1941 by the WPA. The rock retaining wall was constructed out of materials taken from the second (1884) courthouse. A World War II Memorial stands in the foreground of the picture, and a granite marker at the far right commemorates the county's 1957 Centennial. Native pecan, elm and oak trees surround the county seat. The building is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
[ F. Troop 124th Cavalry ]
Shown here is a picture of the F Troop, 124th Cavalry, taken on the steps of the Baker Hotel at one of their annual meetings in the 1960's. From left to right 1st row: J. Harrington, P. Henson, M. Yell, J. Scott, L. Holt, J. Cooper, W. McQueary, W. Holt, G. Rankin, 2nd row: F. Crow, J. Warner, T. Owens, L. Knight, A. Lee, R. Huddleston, H. Warren, C. Baker, L. Hudspeth, T. Newton, T. J. Newton, 3rd row: G. Hines, E. Warren, O. Keller, N. Yates, J. Kincaid, R. Bell, H. Rochelle, D. McMinn, G. Lee, T. Blanton, 4th row: J. Harrington, V. Poe, N. Stockstill, A. Hudspeth, H. Blanton, N. Kimbrough, W. Bell, 5th row: C. Kirby, J. Harrison, O. Martin, S. Whatley, J. Dews, Dr. J. Huey. F Troop served with distinction in the China-Burma-India Theater of war in World War II. England's Lord Mountbatten, Commander of the C-B-I Theater, dedicated a monument to F Troop in Mineral Wells, October 14, 1972. The monument still stands on the south side of the 500 block of SE 1st Street.
[A Brazos River Scene]
This 1925 photograph shows individuals, in clothing of the period, at the Brazos River. It appears to be a holiday outing. Some of the people sitting and standing are in full dress, and not wearing swim suits. The flat and sandy shore is reminiscent of the Village Bend area of the Brazos River in the vicinity of Oaks Crossing (the early Brazos ford on the main road from Palo Pinto to Weatherford) some 6 miles southeast of Palo Pinto. The opposite shoreline in the photograph is rocky, with heavy vegetation and high banks. The photograph comes from a Knights of Pythias Album.
[Mineral Wells' First Public School Erected in 1884]
This rock structure is now [2008] a museum dedicated to the preservation of the history of the city. There was some construction around the school at the time of this photograph, probably due to the building of Mineral Wells' first high school, the West Ward School, on the same lot, next door to and north of the little Rock School in 1902.
[Swimming at Lovers Retreat]
Individuals are shown boating and swimming in Eagle Creek at Lovers Retreat, four miles west of Palo Pinto. The large swimming/fishing area of the creek is separated from the beautiful picnic area to the south of the creek (and to the right in the photograph), and also from a spectacular boulder field north of the creek. A suspension foot-bridge spanned Eagle Creek in this area. This view is from the suspension bridge, looking east on Eagle Creek.