Boyce Ditto Public Library - 59 Matching Results

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The Tattler, May 18, 1934

Description: Student newspaper from Mineral Wells High School in Mineral Wells, Texas. It contains articles about the graduating class of 1934, including information about class officers, class prophecies, caps and gowns, class events, and local advertisements.
Date: May 18, 1934
Creator: Mineral Wells High School

Sewerage Disposal Plant

Description: Mineral Wells' Sewerage Disposal Plant was built on the site of the former Elmhurst Park on Pollard Creek, approximately 2 miles SSW of the city. The city obtained the park property, and built the sewerage treatment plant during the recovery from the Great Depression of the 1930's. Shown here is a photograph of a clipping from a newspaper.
Date: 1930?/1939?

View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain Showing Crazy Hotel & Nazareth Hospital

Description: A view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain, looking West-Northwest is shown here. The Crazy Hotel is visible in the near-left part of the picture, and the Nazareth Hospital in the middle-left, a block Northwest of the Crazy The Norwood Clinic (with its stately white columns), a block northeast of the Nazareth, is located near the center of the picture.
Date: 1930?/1939?

[Inside of the Crazy Water Bottling Plant]

Description: Handwriting on the back of this photograph identifies it as "Crazy Fiz 1930s" It is a section of the Crazy Water Bottling Plant, where carbon dioxide appears to have been added to the mineral water in order to compete with the popular soft drinks of the era. Note the bottling machine in the right foreground of the picture. Women are packing the carbonated "fizz water" for shipment.
Date: 1930/1939

[The Crazy Water Bottling Company]

Description: A note on back of this photograph states, "Crazy Fiz, 1930's." It apparently shows a section of the Crazy Water Bottling Company, where carbonation of the mineral water converted it to a "Crazy Fiz", a product similar to the popular carbonated soft drinks of the day. It was also bottled and packaged for shipment here.
Date: 1930/1939

[The Womanless Theater]

Description: This is apparently the picture of a picture of a fund-raiser performed by the Lion's Club. It consisted of a play in which men all played the roles of women. Identified (in print) are the three "ladies" in front: J. B Courtney (Miss Fortune), Charles Williams, and Noble Glenn (Miss Applied). Also identified (in holograph) is Cecil Young, third from the right, presumably among the standing "ladies."
Date: 1930?/1935

Crazy Radio Theatre

Description: According to A. F. Weaver, in his book "Time was in Mineral Wells", the Crazy Radio Theatre broadcast from the lobby of the Crazy Hotel in Mineral Wells over the Texas Quality Network. The show's origin is said to be the selling of "Crazy Water Crystals." Identified are Hal Collins (Manager of the Crazy Hotel), Paul, Ludy, Dick, Jake, Slim. [No last names are given.] Please note the early 12-string steel guitar held by Paul.
Date: 1933?

[The Milling Sanatorium]

Description: Dr. H. H. Milling was the first of Mineral Wells' "rubbin' doctors." He operated the Mineral Wells Sanatorium at 315 NW 1st Avenue before building this sanitarium in the 2500 block of SE 6th Avenue - the old Millsap Highway) about 1929. The building was later sold and renamed Irvine Sanitarium. It now [2010] belongs to the Veterans of Foreign Wars, is located at 1400 SE VFW Highway (a branch of SE 6th Avenue), and houses VFW Post 2399. Dr. Milling also owned 60 acres on Pollard Creek in north Mineral Wells that were donated to the state of Texas to use as a State Park, which became SP8. During the Great Depression of the 1930's, the WPA and the CCC made several additions to that park to improve its recreational value: Bridges, a small dam, steps up the mountain, restrooms, etc., all using native sandstone. When Milling Park was determined by the state to be surplus property, it was deeded to the city and later renamed North City Park.
Date: 1935?

Crazy Sign Across The 100 Block of Hubbard Street

Description: This picture shows a post-card of the sign. It also represents the original version of the picture of the Crazy Sign. A colorized version, by A. F. Weaver, may be found under the title [Crazy Sign]. It was constructed in 1933 over East Hubbard Street, (later to become part of the Bankhead Highway--later still, US Highway 180) in the center of Mineral Wells. It was quite a landmark as it was one of only two signs allowed by by the Texas Department of Transportation to span a highway maintained by the state agency. The sign was torn down on December 24, 1958. The choice of Christmas Eve was made, it was declared, because there would be a minimum of traffic on that day. The sign was later salvaged for scrap. . Information about the sign was taken, for the most part, from A.F. Weaver's "Time Was..." on page 30.
Date: 1933?

[The Lions Club Womanless Wedding]

Description: Pictured here is the Lion's Club "Woman-less Wedding", a Community Entertainment Production sponsored by the local Lion's Club as a fund-raiser for local charity, and popular around the 1930's and 1940's. Participants are identified as: Seated; J. B. Courtney (Miss Fortune), Charles Williams and Noble Glenn (Miss Applied). Standing; Cary Lodal, Dr. Holder, Bob Joiner, Jess Purvine, Cecil Young, Charlie Johnson and Frank Burney (Mae West).
Date: 1935?

[Crystal Plant]

Description: A picture of the Crystal Production Line is shown here. On the back of the photograph is typed: CRYSTALS WERE THEN PACKED INTO GREEN AND WHITE BOXES AND RUN DOWN THE CONVEYOR WHERE GIRLS PLACED THE LIDS. AT THE END OF THE BELT A MACHINE WRAPPED THE BOX IN CELLOPHANE. PHOTO 1930
Date: 1930

[The Baker Hotel and the First Methodist Church]

Description: This picture, showing Baker Hotel and the First Methodist Church, was taken approximately in 1938. The church, pictured here, shows a later second story to the building on the side of the church proper. It is known to be the second Methodist church on the site. Older photographs of its predecessor are at this time [2014] lacking.
Date: 1938