Boyce Ditto Public Library - 403 Matching Results

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[The Woodmen of the World Convention at the Chautauqua]

Description: The caption of this picture, shown on page 50 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, states: "Part of the Woodmen of the World convention men gathered in front of the Chautauqua [building] for this picture in 1911. Many thousand attended." Note the men perched in two of the trees to the right (and left) of the observer, and also those sitting on top of the sign at the left of the picture. The building itself was demolished, probably during the following year, 1912.
Date: 1911

The [Old] City Hall

Description: This picture shows the old Mineral Wells City Hall at 202 N. Oak Avenue. Police, who were on foot, were summoned to the police station by a red light in the dome of the Baker Hotel before the two-way radio came into use. The City Hall was later located at 215 [Weaver's book, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", on page 152, says 211] S.W. 1st Avenue with Fire and Police station at 215 [the book says 212] S. Oak--east of the City Hall.
Date: unknown

[Lake Mineral Wells, 2 of 4]

Description: The dam of Lake Mineral Wells is shown here during a flood, March 1976. A large area of Palo Pinto and Parker counties received heavy rains (up to 7.2 inches in places) during a three-day period. The road directly below the dam was entirely under water, and the effect of water flowing over the road is barely visible. Heavy damage was also reported over a substantial part of the City of Mineral Wells as a result of the downpour.
Date: April 1976

[Crazy Crystals]

Description: Men and women are shown here packaging Crazy Water Crystals. Mineral water was evaporated, and the resulting crystal deposits were gathered and packaged in various sizes for shipment throughout the United States. Written on back of this photograph is: "Pkg Crazy Crystals 1930's" and the name "Buster."
Date: 1930/1939

[Crazy Fiz]

Description: Products were developed to satisfy the public's search for health during the heyday of the Mineral Wells Health Industry. One of these was Crazy Fiz. Carbon dioxide was infused into mineral water under pressure to create a "Sparkling water" drink labeled "Crazy Fiz." The women in this photograph of the Crazy Water Crystal plant are packaging the Crazy Fiz for distribution. On the back of the photograph is printed "Crazy Fiz 1930's."
Date: 1930/1939

[The Crazy Crystal Bottling Plant]

Description: A picture of the interior of the Crazy Bottling Plant, ladies are shown bottling Crazy Fiz, a copyrighted beverage created by infusing cooled mineral water with carbon dioxide. The men shown here appear to be checking the process in preparation for the bottling of the Crazy Fiz, while the ladies bottle and crate the finished product for shipment. Note the plant's scrupulous cleanliness, and the fact that all employees are dressed in white.
Date: 1940?

[Mineral Wells Policemen]

Description: On back of this photograph is written: "T. Row. L to R. Harry Shuffler, Gilbert Summerfield, L.D. Hill, Bill Patton & Odie Heath 1953 B. Row L. to R. Chief Frank Granbury, B Lain (probably "Blain") Price, John Fletcher, E. Scott Tobey & Alfred A Perkins" The picture was donated to the Mineral Wells Heritage Association on February 12, 1988, by Scott Tobey.
Date: 1953

[The Mineral Wells Fire Department in 1975]

Description: Photograph of a group of firefighters posing in front of a firetruck. Shown in the top row are: Rene James, Weldon Hood, Jerry Kidwell, Walter Carter, Jerry Loftis. In the middle row: Eddie Bell, Eldred Fryer, Horace Roe, Bud Smith, Joe Knight, Kenneth Kinder. In the front row: B.H. "Tiny" Gilstrap, Eddie Fryer, Melton Brewton (Chief), Jerry Van Natta, Allen Fryer, Rickey Epperson, Larry Clutts, Louis Clutts, Butch Clutts, Gene Knerr, Davis Light, John Gilbert, Byron Kizziah, Bazil Wright, R.S. Purcell, W.G. Mullins, Sam Smith, Arthur Schulte, Cecil Holifield. Information for these names was taken from the back of photograph.
Date: 1975

[Farmer's Market at the Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park]

Description: This photograph, printed in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS IN Mineral Wells..." on page 88, illustrates a display of fruit jars at the Mineral Wells Fair, held at the Dancing Pavilion at Elmhurst Park. Canned fruits and vegetables were customarily entered in Palo Pinto County's annual fall harvest fair. Elmhurst Park hosted the fair, among other popular events during its heyday. The popularity of personal automobile transportation made transit by street car unprofitable by 1913, and the park closed shortly after the street cars were discontinued. The City of Mineral Wells' water treatment facilities are now located in the southwest part of town, on the former Elmhurst Park property.
Date: 1910?

[The Mineral Wells Police Force and City/County Ambulance Service]

Description: Shown here is a picture of the Mineral Wells Police force and the City/County Ambulance Service, taken in 1974. From left to right are: Bennie Hutcheson, R.A. Hodges, Jim Elmore, Jimmy Davis, Walter Graves, Orville West, Montiford Parker, Henry Childress, Don Farriel, Larry Brandenburg, Bill Meaders, Raymond Jones, Mike Poe, Ricky Shank, Fred Foreman (Police Chief), Gene Knerr, Gilbert Sommerfield (Investigator), David Jared, and Ronnie Edwards. The information was taken from the back of photograph, which itself was taken at the West City Park. It is published on page 153 of A.F.Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells."
Date: 1974
Creator: Weaver, A. F.

[The Damron Hotel Fire, 12 of 21: Numerous Fire Hoses Lying in Front of the Hotel]

Description: Another view of the front entrance to the Damron Hotel at 109 W. Hubbard during the earlier stages of the fire that completely destroyed it on December 22, 1975. Debris from the burning hotel wafted as far as seven blocks from the burning building. No major injuries were reported. The spectacular Holiday fire that destroyed the hotel received extensive photographic coverage.
Date: December 22, 1975

[Dedication of the "Little Rock Schoolhouse" Museum: A Marker is Unveiled]

Description: A marker commemorating the conversion of Mineral Wells' first school to a museum. "The Little Rock Schoolhouse" was built in 1884, and though tuition was charged to the students to pay the teacher, the school building, itself, was built by the city. A granite marker to commemorate the conversion of the school to a museum was unveiled at this dedication.
Date: April 14, 1978

[Dr. J.H. McCracken Home, 3 of 3: Different View]

Description: The Dr. J.H. McCracken home, built in 1904 at 516 West Hubbard, and restored by Gil Hull. Joseph Hill McCracken was born on a farm near Springtown, Texas, October 1, 1867. He graduated from the University of Tennessee Medical School in 1891, and returned to Texas. He married Marie Sue Wilson, the daughter of Oliver Loving's youngest daughter, Margaret on October 15, 1895. He was elected President of the Texas Medical Association in 1911 and practiced medicine in Mineral Wells for over fifty years. He frequently laughed about having "delivered babies of babies of babies." Dr. McCracken died in March of 1954, and his wife died in November of 1955. Both are buried in Mineral Wells' Woodland Park Cemetery. Professor John N. McCracken, who established the Mineral Wells College directly across the street west of the McCracken home, is believed to be Dr. McCracken's father. [For details of the Mineral Wells College, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School, Texas"]
Date: unknown

[Dr. J.H. McCracken Home, 1 of 3: Little Rock School and Fannin School]

Description: The Dr. J.H. McCracken home was built in 1904 at 516 W. Hubbard Street, and was restored by Gil Hull. Joseph Hill McCracken was born on a farm near Springtown, Texas, October 1, 1867. He graduated from the University of Tennessee Medical School in 1891, and returned to Texas. On October 15, 1895, he married Marie Sue Wilson, the daughter of Oliver Loving's youngest daughter, Margaret. He was elected President of the Texas Medical Association in 1911, and practiced medicine in Mineral Wells for over fifty years. He frequently laughed about having "delivered babies of babies of babies." Dr. McCracken died in March of 1954, and his wife died in November of 1955. Both are buried in Mineral Wells' Woodland Park Cemetery. Professor John N, McCracken, who established the Mineral Wells College directly across the street west of the McCracken home, is believed to be Dr. McCracken's father. [For details of the Mineral Wells College, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School,Texas"] The "Old High School" and the "Little Rock School" (left side of the picture) are visible in the background.
Date: unknown

[Dr. J.H. McCracken Home, 2 of 3]

Description: The Dr. J.H. McCracken home built in 1904 at 516 West Hubbard Street. It was restored by Gil Hull. Joseph Hill McCracken was born on a farm near Springtown, Texas, October 1, 1867. He graduated from the University of Tennessee Medical School in 1891, and returned to Texas. On October 15, 1895, he married Marie Sue Wilson, the daughter of Oliver Loving's youngest daughter, Margaret. He was elected President of the Texas Medical Association in 1911, and practiced medicine in Mineral Wells for over fifty years. He frequently laughed about having "delivered babies of babies of babies." Dr. McCracken died in March of 1954, and his wife died in November of 1955. Both are buried in Mineral Wells' Woodland Park Cemetery. Professor John N, McCracken, who established the Mineral Wells College directly across the street west of the McCracken home, is believed to be Dr. McCracken's father. It is presently [2016] the offices of Brown and Ford, attorneys-at-law. [For details of the Mineral Wells College, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School, Texas."]
Date: unknown

[The Weatherford, Mineral Wells, Northwestern Railroad Depot]

Description: The Weatherford, Mineral Wells, and Northwestern (WMW&NW) Railroad began operations October 1,1891, and it owned two locomotives. It was chartered in 1889 to build a road from Weatherford to Mineral Wells--about twenty-five miles. in 1895, it had earned $15,561 in passenger revenue, and $38,070 in freight. The Texas & Pacific Railway bought out the railroad in 1902, and extended the line eighteen miles to include the town of Graford. It built this depot shortly thereafter to replace a former wooden structure that had been destroyed by fire. The rail line had a colorful history, operating through World War II and into the 1990's. Construction of an extension of the line to the city of Oran was completed in 1907, which connected it to Graford. In 1912 two McKeen motor coaches (called "Doodlebugs" by the locals)were added. These were self-contained, 200 Horsepower, 70-foot long, gasoline-powered, 80-passenger coaches which provided service between Mineral Wells, Weatherford, Fort Worth and Dallas. A round trip took less than six hours, and two "Doodlebugs" provided service in each direction every three hours. In 1913, the Gulf Texas and Western Railroad, building south from Seymour, Texas, began operations over the WMW&NW line from Salesville to Mineral Wells, thus connecting the cities of Seymour, Olney, Jacksboro, Graford, Oran, Salesville, Mineral Wells, and Weatherford with daily round-trip service to Dallas. The demise of the railroad was slow. In 1928, passenger traffic had declined to a point that passenger service was discontinued, and did not resume until the nation began mobilizing for World War II in 1940. Nearly a half million troops (429,966) passed through the depot during the war years in transit to and from Ft. Wolters training base. In 1936, twelve miles of line between Salesville and Graford was abandoned. Only freight traffic was maintained by 1945. The ...
Date: 1990?

[Lynch Plaza 3 of 3]

Description: Lynch Plaza, in the center of this picture, is located on the corner of North Oak and East Hubbard Streets. This structure, originally called the Firstron Building, replaced the First National Bank at this location. The bank was located in the northwest corner of the Oxford Hotel. The hotel building, including the bank, was destroyed by fire in 1983.
Date: September 1988