Boyce Ditto Public Library - 173 Matching Results

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[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (first)]

Description: Shown here is a panoramic View of Mineral Wells, Texas taken August 8, 1974. The Baker Hotel and the Crazy Water Hotel are visible. The Convention Center is seen in the far left of the photograph. The view is from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain over north Mineral Wells.
Date: August 10, 1974

First National Bank

Description: The first National Bank, at the southeast corner of Oak Avenue and Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells, was originally located in the Oxford Hotel. The Lynch Building and Plaza were built on the site of the hotel, commemorating the location of the discovery of mineral water with "miracle healing powers" by a well drilled here by James A. Lynch in 1879, after the Oxford burned in 1983.
Date: 1970?

[The Crazy Hotel Barber Shop]

Description: A photograph of the barber Shop in the Crazy Hotel is shown here, including a long row of mirrors and waiting area on the far right, and stations for cutting hair on the left. In the center of the image, "Shoe Shine Boy" Leon Cross is seated next to a shoe-shine stand and an unidentified man (presumably, a barber) is seated near him in a barber chair.
Date: 1974

[The Auction of the First Edition of TIME WAS In Mineral Wells]

Description: This photograph shows the auction of the first ten copies of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition, 1975. Identified (facing the crowd in front row) are Mrs. Richard Warren (with arms folded); Mrs. A.F. (Patsy) Weaver; A.F. (Art) Weaver, Author; Rev. Bobby Moore, Auctioneer. The auction took place inside the restored "Little Rock School", Mineral Wells' first public school.
Date: August 1975

[The Auction of the First Edition of TIME WAS In Mineral Wells]

Description: This photograph shows the purchaser who bought the first copy of "Time Was in Mineral Wells", and his wife. Left to right are: Rev. Bobby Moore, auctioneer; Jack Dickens, purchaser; A.F. Weaver, author; Mrs. Jean Dickens. Copy Number One sold for $153.57. (H. Arthur Zappe D.D.S., bought copy Number Two for $45, and Bill Bennett bought copy Number Three for an undisclosed price.)
Date: August 1975

[The TIME WAS Book Auction]

Description: The auction of first edition of "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." The men in picture were: (left to right) the Reverend Mr. Bobby Moore, auctioneer; Art Weaver, author; H. Arthur Zappe, DDS, Mayor of Mineral Wells; and Frost Bowman, Banker. The Reverend Mr. Moore was pastor of the First Baptist Church at the time. Mr. Weaver was a photographer, and the first president of the Mineral Wells Heritage Association. Dr. Zappe was a dentist, and Mr. Bowman was a Director of Mineral Wells Heritage Association.
Date: August 1975

[The Sangcura Sprudel Fire]

Description: The Sangcura-Sprudel Well drinking pavilion was originally located at 800 N.W. 2nd Avenue. It was moved to 314 N.W. 5th Street. The porches on the building were enclosed, and it was converted to a rooming house. It burned December 5, 1973, just five minutes before the start of the Mineral Wells Christmas Parade. The remaining part of the Period Hotel on N.W. 4th Avenue, which also burned at another date, was converted into apartments that can be seen through the smoke in the upper left of the picture. This photograph is found on page 64 of A.F Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells,"' First Edition, 1974.
Date: December 5, 1973

Three Railroads to Mineral Wells

Description: A pamphlet, containing a brief history of the Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwestern Railway, the Gulf and Brazos Valley Railway, and the Gulf, Texas and Western Railway is shown here. It has a map of rail routes, photographs, and copies of schedules with ticket prices.
Date: 1976
Creator: Payne, H. L.

[The Brewer Home]

Description: The Brewer home on East Mountain is shown here, from a picture taken April 4, 1976. It is visible from most of North Oak Avenue. Originally the Murphy Home, the building underwent many renovations during the period of Mr. Murphy's residence. Mr. Murphy was a contractor who built many buildings in Mineral Wells, including the Mineral Wells High School (1914) and the third First Baptist Church. It is a good example of Neo-classical architecture.
Date: April 4, 1976

[Mineral Wells Heritage Association, 1975]

Description: This picture immortalizes the signing of the 25-year lease at $25 per year of the 1884 Little Rock School building for the purpose of establishing it as a museum. Pictured, left to right are: A. F. Weaver, President of the Mineral Wells Heritage Association; L. Gordon Nelson, Vice President; Mrs. Gordon Nelson, Chairperson for the Restoration Committee. Seated is Bill Hall, Superintendent of Mineral Wells Schools. The photograph was taken in July, 1975. The Little Rock School, in 2007, remains a museum dedicated to the preservation of the History of Mineral Wells. This picture appears in "Time Was in Mineral Wells...." on page 173.
Date: July 1, 1975

[The Fire at the Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building]

Description: The Sangcura-Sprudel Well, located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue, was built around 1900. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, and the porches were enclosed. It was then re-modeled into a rooming house. The building burned down on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells.
Date: December 5, 1973

[The Crazy Well]

Description: This picture was taken in 1974, looking south on NW 1st Avenue from NW 4th Street, showing the metal cover, in the sidewalk corner, of the Crazy Well. It is full of Crazy water, ready to be pumped out and used. The building on the left is the west side of the present [2008] Crazy Water Retirement Hotel. This information was taken from Art Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...", page 29. This well was the third one dug in Mineral Wells.
Date: 1974

[The Rock School House]

Description: The Rock School, erected in 1884, was Mineral Wells' first public school. It was last used in 1957 as a band hall. It was leased to the Mineral Wells Heritage Association in 1974, renovated and converted to a museum dedicated to the preservation of the history of the City of Mineral Wells. This picture appears to have been taken at the time of its renovation and conversion, as the worker on the ladder makes evident. The bell tower has been enclosed, and window screens and doors have been painted or replaced. The property now belongs to the Fifty Year Club, but the museum is still operated by the non-profit Heritage Association.
Date: 1974
Creator: Weaver, A. F.

[ A Close-up of Calvary Baptist Parsonage]

Description: This home was the parsonage of Calvary Baptist Church in 1975, according to a note on back of the picture. Note the brick crosses worked into the stone-work above the front door and on the chimney. The picture also shows some structural cracks in the native sandstone rockery above the entrance and window, probably indicating foundation damage. There are also some weathered holes in the structurally-sound, but odd, limestone rocks used in construction.
Date: 1975

[The Calvary Baptist Church in 1975]

Description: The Calvary Baptist Church, as it appeared in 1975, is shown here. Note the combined use of native stone and brick and the lack of a peaked roof. The upper part of the windows appear to be stained (or painted) glass. This one of a series of pictures of the church and parsonage, showing structural damage prior to their demolition. This native rock and red brick church faced south on SE 5th Street, and the white brick structure which replaced it is built on the same city block but faces west on SE 6th Avenue.
Date: 1975

Famous Mineral Water

Description: The Famous Water Company, founded by Ed Dismuke (still located at 215 NW 6th Street) has been restored, and still [2007] sells mineral water. The large concrete bottle depicts the original shape of the container of the product sold. Dismuke also established a plant on the east bank of Lake Pinto, west of Mineral Wells, to manufacture his "PRONTO-LAX" Crystals. He organized the Mineral Wells Lakewood Scenic Railway in partnership with local banker Cicero Smith, whose gasoline-powered "Dinky Cars" operated quarter-hourly between Lake Pinto and Mineral Wells from 1905 to 1909. The Famous Water Company currently sells three grades of water: Regular, full-strength mineral water; deep (400 ft.) well water; and deep-well water that has been ionized and filtered by reverse osmosis.
Date: 1970?

[The Thurber Tipple and Thurber Monument]

Description: Photograph of buildings in Thurber, Texas, taken from a parking lot. A gasoline station is on the left; it has a second story serving as an overhang as well as a taller platform with a railing and the words "Thurber Tipple" written near the roof. A car is parked at the gasoline station and a couple is looking inside the engine. The Thurber smokestack is visible near the center of the photograph and several unidentified buildings are on the left. Three other cars are parked on the left side of the photograph.
Date: August 4, 1974
Location Info:

[The Welcome Sign]

Description: The WELCOME Sign (shown here) was fostered in 1922 by George Holmgren, the Texas Rotary Club's Governor, following a convention of the Rotary Club in Mineral Wells. The twelve-foot letters were built in Mr. Holmgren's San Antonio iron works by Mr. James Calvert, who was 17 years old when he and his father were commissioned to forge the letters. Mr. Calvert had played trumpet in the "F" troop cavalry as well as playing in the Frank Bird Orchestra in the Baker Hotel. Mr. Holmgren then gave the sign to the people of Mineral Wells with the understanding that they would maintain what was, at the time, the world's largest non-commercial lighted sign. The original incandescent bulbs were later replaced with lower-maintenance red neon lights by the Mineral Wells Jaycees. A Warrant Officer Company from Fort Wolters moved the sign from its original site on East Mountain to the east side of Bald Mountain (now called Welcome Mountain), overlooking Elmwood Cemetery, in 1972. It remains there today [2008], lighted at its base with flood lights, to greet visitors coming from the east. This is a picture, taken in 1972, of the restored sign.
Date: 1972