Boyce Ditto Public Library - 878 Matching Results

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Central Christian Church

Description: Shown here is Central Christian Church: NW 1st Street. This picture is taken from a collage that illustrates several [Protestant] churches in Mineral Wells.
Date: unknown

[The Clark Residence on N W 4th Ave.]

Description: The W. V. Clark residence on NW 4th Avenue (which was originally called Pecan Street) is shown here. This photograph was taken in June of 1974. A photograph on page 139 of "TIME WAS..." by A. F. Weaver shows the house to better advantage before foliage of the trees obscured part of it. It is presently [2016] in sad condition, and in need of remodeling.
Date: unknown

[The Christmas Rush With the First Airmail]

Description: The sorting room of the "old post office" at Christmas time is ilustrated here. Airmail had just arrived in Mineral Wells. The caption "1916" is written in the top margin of photograph. Air Mail arrived in Mineral Wells in two distinct eras. The first was from the 1916 date on this photograph to about the beginning of World War II. The mail route of that era was marked by rotating signal beacons for night flight, and low frequency radio directional beams with "A" (dot-dash) and "N" (dash-dot) Morse Code signals to indicate straying, right or left, from the true course between landing fields during flight operations. These deliveries were suspended during World War II, and improved service was resumed for a period of time a few years after the war. At one time during the 1950's-1960's, Trans Texas Airways operated from Shreveport,Louisiana. to El Paso, Texas It made scheduled daily stops in Mineral Wells for both passengers and mail.
Date: unknown

[The Chautauqua Hall]

Description: This picture shows a side view of the Chautauqua Hall, once located on the side of Welcome Mountain, where the Jaycee Youth Center is now [2010] located (behind the Grand Theater.) It was taken, perhaps,in late spring or early summer--possibly in the morning. The photograph is featured in "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..." on page 50. The building departed existence in 1912. The Chautauqua movement began in 1874 in an eponymous town in New York (it is still there). It was conceived as a form of adult education, which featured a set of touring lectures. Before the advent of moving pictures and the radio, Chautauqua was immensely popular. Some fifty years later, though, H.L. Mencken (Prejudices, Series I) speaks disparagingly of "[T]he buffooneries [sic] of the Chautauqua." Mr. Mencken had a reputation for disparaging everything in his sight (that was American), though. This remark is his only direct comment on the movement. He refers to Chautauqua only tangentially otherwise. One might surmise, therefore, that Chautauqua had followed a parallel route that television (which supplanted it) did in later years.
Date: unknown

City Meat Market

Description: The City Meat Market was located south of the Oxford Hotel. It faced SE 1st Street, where the entrance to the First National (Bank?) was located. Please observe the horse-drawn wagon at the right of the photograph. Modern [2016] viewers might be appalled at the sight of sides of meat hanging in the open air; but when this photograph was taken, it was standard procedure. The gentleman holding the carcasses of poultry probably does so only for the sake of the picture. The clean aprons of all the men associated with the store were probably also donned only for the picture. Otherwise, they would be heavily blood-stained. This building later housed Roger's Army Store. Information about it was taken from A. F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", second edition, page 121.
Date: unknown

[The City Nestled Among the Hills]

Description: This picture was taken from East Mountain, from a site above and left (south) of the former Chautauqua (1905-1912.) Note the Crazy Water Hotel at the left edge of the picture (which opened in 1927 on the corner of North Oak and NW 3rd Streets.) Note also the Nazareth Hospital built by the Crazy Corporation, behind and right of the Crazy. The back of the "WELCOME" (1921 vintage) sign on the south end of this mountain and facing south, is at the immediate middle foreground. This sign was the world's largest non-commercial electric lighted sign when it was donated to the city in 1922 following a Rotary Club of Texas convention. The sign is reputed by local folklore to be the inspiration for the more publicized "HOLLYWOOD" sign in Los Angeles, California. It is much larger than the photograph suggests. Lesser known sites in the picture are The Hawthorn Drinking Pavilion one block north (right) of Nazareth Hospital and the Crazy Theater, across Oak Avenue, at the right and front of the Crazy.
Date: 1927

[Dedication of W.P (Bill) Cameron Mounument: Sen. Tom Creighton Speaks]

Description: Texas State Senator Tom Creighton delivers the keynote address at the dedication of a memorial marker to W.P. (Bill) Cameron at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse" Museum. Mr. Cameron was the Editor of the Mineral Wells Index newspaper, and an active and popular participant in local civic and social events. After his death, his family placed a marker in his honor at the museum. Members of Mr. Cameron's family are seated to the speaker's left, and the Junior High Ensemble, Director Vicki Carden, are on the museum steps behind and to the speaker's right, Please contact the collection webmaster if you recognize other persons in the picture. The marker has been removed, and its location is not known at this time.[see previous photographs for more details.] Very dimly visible in an enlarged photo, inside the open door of the museum, is an original five-pointed wooden star that decorated a gable of the historic Hexagon House Hotel.
Date: April 14, 1978
Creator: Weaver, A. F.

Delaware Hotel

Description: The Delaware Hotel, at 316 North Oak Avenue, is shown here in its glory days. Formerly named "The St. Nicholas Hotel", the Delaware was destroyed by fire. The plat is shown in the 1900 map of Mineral Wells as the site of a sanitarium. This photograph has been restored. It appears in its original form (as the St. Nicholas) in the picture [St. Nicholas Hotel]. The current picture was "modified" with the name changes (to the Delaware) on signs and re-named at the bottom of the picture. This was probably the best picture of the structure at the time the hotel became the Delaware, . (Subsequent adjacent buildings and power lines interfered with the view). The Chautauqua is identifiable at the immediate left and behind the hotel. This version of the picture is on page 104 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells..."
Date: unknown

[The Delaware Hotel Fire]

Description: The Delaware Hotel (formerly the St. Nicholas), at the corner of NE 3rd Street and N. Oak Avenue, is shown in the process of burning down on October of 1907. It was owned by Mssrs. Little & Mitchell, who estimated the loss of the building at 41,000 with only $22.500 in insurance. The furniture was valued at $6,000, with $2,500 in insurance. The hotel bar, owned by Emmett Martin was valued at $6,000, with insurance totaling $2,500. Also pictured is the Brazos Valley Land Company advertising FARMS RANCHES and CITY PROPERTY. The photograph appears on page 104 of "Time Was...", Second Edition.
Date: unknown

[The Delaware Hotel on fire]

Description: The destruction of the Delaware Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas is illustrated here. The hotel was located at the corner of N. Oak Avenue and NE 3rd St. It was described at "Brick veneered." It was filled with guests at the time, many of whom narrowly escaped with their lives. the Louisiana House (damaged to the extent of$300, with no insurance), just across the street was described as "Damaged." The fire was fought by horse-drawn fire wagons and a pumper. Trolley rails visible in middle of unpaved street date the picture as being between 1907, when the street car began operations, and 1914 when the street was paved. A partly obliterated legend on the photograph declares that it was taken by "Ellis."
Date: unknown

[The Demolition of the Convention Hall--1 of 5: Front View]

Description: The metal framework of the Mineral Wells Convention Hall is all that it readily visible during its demolition in 1975/1976. Built on the rock foundation of the Electric Plant that Galbraith had erected in order (Unsuccessfully, it is guessed) to light the city. The Convention Hall was built for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention in 1925. It served as the site of numerous local functions including High School Graduation Exercises. The landmark Hexagon Hotel, Mineral Wells' first electrically-lighted hotel, stood on the vacant corner lot in the left foreground of this picture from 1897 to 1959.
Date: 1975
Creator: Weaver, A. F.

The Crazy Well Water Company

Description: This picture shows a photograph of two pages from a water-bottle-shaped brochure about Mineral Wells. The "Appendix" referred to on the verso folio refers to a series of burlesques printed on previous--unseen--pages. Recto describes the four types of the water and the various ailments that they are expected to cure. The brochure notes that number four water is purgative, and should be used in moderation, but at frequent intervals.
Date: 1920?

[A Crowd at a Race]

Description: A note on the back of the picture identifies this scene as being at Elmhurst Park. The rails on either side indicate that this is a photograph of a race track. There is a chalk circle in the middle of the track, and a companion picture shows this circle being used for shot-put/discus competition. The spectator in the left foreground is leaning into the track to get a better look at a runner approaching the finish line at the far end of the track.
Date: 1910?

[Dedication of the "Little Rock Schoolhouse" Museum: A Marker is Unveiled]

Description: A marker commemorating the conversion of Mineral Wells' first school to a museum. "The Little Rock Schoolhouse" was built in 1884, and though tuition was charged to the students to pay the teacher, the school building, itself, was built by the city. A granite marker to commemorate the conversion of the school to a museum was unveiled at this dedication.
Date: April 14, 1978

[A Crowd at a Speech]

Description: A crowd (the picture dates to approximately 1910) appears to be attending the awarding of prizes for an athletic event--probably a track meet, judging by companion photographs. The location of the photograph is at Elmhurst Park, an amusement park in the early 1900's on Pollard Creek about two miles southwest of Mineral Wells.
Date: unknown

[The Cumberland Presbyterian Church]

Description: Shown here is a picture of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. On the back of picture is written "901 N.Oak [.] Sold to Church of Christ [.] Demolished and rebuilt." The streetcar tracks, which ran from 1907 to 1913 are visible on N. Oak in front of the church. The denomination takes its name from Cumberland Street, Philadelphia. A sub-sect of Presbyterianism--based on an Arminian interpretation of Calvinism--was begun at the church there. A Cumberland Presbyterian church is advertised as being in Newberry at the present [2014] time. The picture was taken before North Oak Avenue was paved in 1914. The Church of Christ still [2008] occupies this location on N. Oak Avenue.
Date: 1907/1913?

[Crystal Plant]

Description: A picture of the Crystal Production Line is shown here. On the back of the photograph is typed: CRYSTALS WERE THEN PACKED INTO GREEN AND WHITE BOXES AND RUN DOWN THE CONVEYOR WHERE GIRLS PLACED THE LIDS. AT THE END OF THE BELT A MACHINE WRAPPED THE BOX IN CELLOPHANE. PHOTO 1930
Date: 1930

[A Back View of Businesses on the West Side of 100 Block and S. Oak]

Description: Businesses are shown here at the southwest corner of West Hubbard Street and South Oak Avenue: The location of the original Colonial Hotel. (It was originally built in 1906 by J.T. Holt for his second wife who would not live in the country, and it was renamed the Damron Hotel about 1917 when Agnew and Bessie Damron traded a ranch for it. The hotel burned in 1975.) The small white building in the left middle foreground is a back view of Cole's House of Flowers (where Davidson's Hardware also burned in the Damron Hotel fire), next to it is Hill's Style Shoppe and Mineral Wells Office Supply. The vacant lot in the foreground is the location of the former Damron hotel. At the far left edge of the picture, to the east and across Oak Avenue, is Lynch Plaza which was built on the site of the former Oxford Hotel, that burned in 1983, along with the First National Bank. Lynch Plaza is named for J.A. Lynch, Mineral Wells' founder. who had a well drilled at this location in 1880, and discovered the source of mineral water that made Mineral Wells the most popular health spa in the nation at the turn of the twentieth century. A Texas Historical Commission Marker commemorating the discovery-well is embedded in a brick wall surrounding the parking lot of Lynch Plaza. Obscurely in middle distance, at the right edge of the picture, south and across SW 1st Street, are the offices of the Palo Pinto County Abstract Company and those of the City of Mineral Wells.
Date: 1988?

[The Baker Hotel: A Picture Taken From the South Window of the Hexagon Hotel]

Description: A note with this photograph states: "Photo taken out of top floor south window of Hexagon Hotel. Photo re-printed in 1977. Photo probably taken 1954 due to penciled in date on back." (Also, the building in the lower left corner of the picture still bears the "USO" sign of World War II.) See also "Hexagon Hotel" [with history]. In front of the Baker Hotel stands the "Old" Post Office, now the Ladies Garden Club Building. The Crazy Hotel can be seen between the right edge of the picture and the spire attached atop one of the gables of the Hexagon Hotel.
Date: unknown

[ A Crazy Hotel Pamphlet]

Description: This is a photograph of a Crazy Water Hotel Pamphlet, stating what entertainments could be found in the hotel, and what millions of others have done. The manager at the time was A. H. Hoaldridge.
Date: 1930?

Dry Goods--W.H.H.Hightower

Description: This picture shows what is conjectured to be a business from either the latest nineteenth, or the earliest twentieth centuries. There appears to be no display window nor door to it, only two posts to hold up the story above. The second story appears to be a clapboard false-front, as the windows and balconet seem only to be painted. Three men stand stiffly inside, one of them by what appears to be a display of straw hats--which perhaps dates the picture to the end of the nineteenth or beginning of the twentieth century. The second story bears the legend DRY GOODS/ BOOTS SHOES HATS &c. GENTS FURNISHING DRESS GOODS &c. W.H. HIGHTOWER. Three flags appear to adorn the front. A holograph on the back reads: "W.H. Hightower Grandfather of Mrs. Lyday & Grady & Rayford Hightower merchant from Georgia first settled in Johnson Co. near Cleburne located near Lattners [sic]"
Date: unknown

A Label of Mineral Water

Description: Shown here is a fairly modern label from a bottle of (concentrated) mineral water. Unlike its earlier representations, it makes no promise of curing disease. Instead, the label gives instructions on how to dilute the water, when to take it--and a warning when not to imbibe.
Date: unknown

The Thatch

Description: This photograph presents a conundrum. Advertising copy from around the picture relates that The Thatch was operated by Mrs. W. G. Wright. The building was said to be located "Within one block of the famous Gibson and Sangcura pavilions" (the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue and the 800 block of NW 2nd Avenue, respectively). Polk's Directory for 1909 fails to record The Thatch, or Mrs. Wright, as also fail the directories for 1920, 1924, and 1927. No mention of the Thatch appears in A.F. Weaver's "Time was in Mineral Wells...." The unpaved roads in front of the hotel suggest that the picture was taken before 1914. Copy around the picture (not visible here) remark that the building was "Erected two years ago", but no firm date may be deduced from that information.
Date: unknown