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ABOUT BROWSE FEED

[The Sangcura-Sprudel Well Building Fire]

Description: The original Sangcura Sprudel Company was located at 800 NW 2nd Avenue. The original building was built by George McAtee. It was sold to Bert Gibson of Gibson Wells Water Company in 1908, and later passed into the possession of the Crazy Well Water Company. It maintained a large pavilion, dance hall and skating rink for several seasons. It--evidently just the house portion--was later moved to 314 N.W. 5th Street. The porches were enclosed, and it was converted into a rooming house. The building burned on December 5, 1973, five minutes before the annual Christmas Parade in Mineral Wells.
Date: unknown

[The Hexagon Hotel]

Description: The popular Hexagon Hotel, built in 1897, was the first structure in Mineral Wells to be electrically-lit. Electricity was supplied by a DC power plant next door. It was located at 701 N. Oak, and was torn down September 1959. This photograph is found on page 177 of "Time Was.." 2nd Ed. by A. F. Weaver.
Date: unknown

[A Man With a plow]

Description: A note on back of photograph states that it shows preparation for paving the brick highway from Mineral Wells to Millsap. The note contains the name D. M. Shrum, but does not indicate that it is the person in the photograph. The brick highway to Millsap was part of the nation's first transcontinental highway, the Bankhead highway, from mile zero in Washington, D.C. to San Diego in California. It was built through Mineral Wells in about 1921.
Date: unknown

[The Gibson Well]

Description: The Gibson Well was located on the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue. In 1888, the label on a bottle of "Natural Gibson Well Water" boasted cures for "constipation, rheumatism, female complaints, nervousness, calculi, stomach, liver, kidney & bladder disorders." Please note the crossing of the "WMW&NW RR" tracks and the "Dinky Car" tracks in the left foreground of the picture.
Date: unknown

A Jinricksha

Description: Notes that accompany the photograph read: "Picture taken near the top of the thousand steps which used to climb East Mountain up NE 3rd Street. Path can still be seen going up the side of the mountain at this point." The souvenir picture was taken in the 1930's, and is believed to have been taken at the photographer's cabin, where the winding donkey trail formerly crossed the steps.
Date: 1930?

[A Park Gathering]

Description: Three unknown men and seven unknown women gather in a park in front of the Gibson Well Drinking Pavilion in the early part of the twentieth century--presumably by the appearance of their clothes. Please observe the parasol that the lady on the right front is holding. The pavilion was located in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue, a site now occupied by the First Christian Church. The exact date of the photograph is unknown.
Date: unknown

[The Yeager Building - Mineral Wells, Texas]

Description: The Yeager Building, located on the southwest corner of NE 1st Street and NE 1st Avenue is shown here. Concrete lettering in the gable atop the building (barely visible in the photograph)identifies it as "YEAGER BLOCK". The building once had a metal lion mounted atop it, giving rise to the story that the business was named "The Lion Drug." Descendants of Dr. Yeager do not recall the place's ever having that name. A casual reference to the building in 1912 gives it as "The Lion Drug", however. The metal lion met its fate by being donated for scrap in a drive for metal during World War II.
Date: unknown

Service Club, Camp Wolters, Texas

Description: An illustration of the Service Club at Camp Wolters, which was located just outside Mineral Wells, Texas is shown here. Once the largest Infantry Replacement Training Center during World War II, Camp [later Fort] Wolters was re-opened during the Korean Conflict, and again during the Vietnam War. This portrait of the service club is probably a photograph taken from an old picture postcard.
Date: unknown

[A Street Scene: Highways 281 and 180]

Description: A picture, looking north on US Highway 281 from NW 1st Street to its intersection with US highway 180 (Hubbard Street). The first building on the right is Lynch Plaza, the location of the discovery of the mineral water well that gave Mineral Wells its name and made it the leading health spa in the state. Other businesses are: Cole's Florist on the west (left) corner of the block opposite Lynch Plaza, Poston's Dry goods (the low building in middle of block north of Cole's), First State Bank on the corner north of Lynch Plaza. The Crazy Hotel can be seen in the distance; three blocks up the street on the left. Oak Street was widened, with turn lanes, in 2005.
Date: 2005

First State Bank & Trust Company

Description: The First State Bank and Trust Company and the Oxford Hotel were located at the corner of Oak and Hubbard Streets. The building burned in 1983. It is now the site of the Lynch Building and Plaza, the site of the first discovered mineral water well in Mineral Wells.
Date: unknown

Laying the Cornerstone of the Post Office

Description: Shown here is the laying the cornerstone of the Post Office at 201 NE 2nd Street on May 13, 1912. The Chautauqua is at the upper left corner of the picture, and the Cliff House Hotel is visible in the upper middle of the picture. Buildings on the right side of the picture were situated on the east side of Mesquite Street (now NE 1st Avenue). Buildings on the far right of the picture were once located where the Baker Hotel now [2008] stands. Early automobiles and horse-drawn carriages also appear in the picture. The photographer appears to have been standing on the north side of NE 2nd Street, looking east. A holograph inscription above and below the picture cannot be read.
Date: May 13, 1912

[People Sitting in a car]

Description: This photograph, looking west on East Hubbard at the corner of NE lst Avenue, shows a touring car, with two men in front and three women behind. Please note the trolley car tracks in front of the car. They are almost covered with dirt and no longer in use. This photograph, taken about 1915, may be found on page 137 of Art Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells."
Date: unknown

[The Crazy Water Crystal Factory]

Description: Shown here is an interior view of the Crazy Crystals Plant. "Crazy Water" was evaporated, and the dissolved solids precipitated as crystals which were then packaged and shipped all over the United States, Canada, England and Australia. By dissolving the Crazy Water crystals in water, the purchaser was able to reconstitute "mineral water" and secure the benefits of one of the earliest "instant" beverages without the added cost of the supplying company's shipping water.
Date: 1940?

[The Crazy Bottling Plant]

Description: The Crazy Water Bottling Plant and Crazy Water Tower are shown here. The plant was built in 1919 at a cost of $85,000, and is located at 300 NW 7th Street. The location was once the original site of the Sangcura-Sprudel Wells Pavilion. The Sangcura-Sprudel Pavilion was moved and converted into a rooming house, which burned in 1973. Notice the home in the background. The date on back of photograph is given as 1940.
Date: 1940

[The First Crazy Hotel]

Description: This picture shows the front of the first Crazy Hotel, which was destroyed by fire March 15, 1925. Built in two stages and joined together, the first (back) section was built in 1912, and the second (front) section was completed in 1914. A handwritten note on back of photograph states, "Crazy Hotel 1913. Front of Hotel Facing South Mineral Wells, Tx." This picture is included on page 15 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS...", and was probably taken before the second section of the hotel opened for business. The back of Crazy Flats (the second Crazy Water Drinking Pavilion) can be seen to the right, north of and behind the hotel in this picture.
Date: 1913

[The Building of the Baker Hotel]

Description: Construction of the Baker HOTEL. [sic], which opened on November 22nd,1929 It was the work of Wyatt C. Hendricks, and Company, Architects. The building cost $1.2 million dollars to construct, of which Mineral Wells residents raised $150,000 towards it. A legend on the back of the photograph states: "Unknown man looks on. Photograph taken approximately from site of Methodist church, looking towards the southwest."
Date: unknown