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[The Crazy Hotel Lobby]

Description: This picture shows the First Crazy Hotel Lobby in 1913. The first Crazy Hotel was built in two sections; the first section, which contained this lobby, was built in 1912. The second section was added in 1914, and joined to the first with the two sections sharing this same sky-lighted lobby. A fire on March 15, 1925 destroyed the first Crazy Hotel along with all the other businesses in this block. The second Crazy Hotel, covering the entire city block, opened in 1927. It is now [2008] a retirement home. It was shut down--after much contention--in 2010.
Date: 1913
Item Type: Photograph

Crazy Hotel, Mineral Wells, Texas

Description: This picture illustrates a postcard of the Crazy Hotel, taken about 1930, well after the "Crazy" burned in 1925. This is a view of the rebuilt hotel, which opened in 1927. It was considered completely up-to-date, and built with solid masonry interior walls to make it fire-proof. The facility is currently [2008] used as a retirement home. In 2010, it was put out of business.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Postcard

The Davis Wells; The Davis Baths

Description: Pictured here is a semi-ornate brick building (with a socle presumably of stone), advertising the Davis Wells and the Davis Baths. This enterprise is not listed in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...." The picture appears to have been excerpted from a larger photograph, as the legend "Davis Baths" (not visible in the picture) appears on the negative. Polk's Directory for 1920 lists "Davis Mineral Baths" (proprietor, Dr. Eldred A.--the "A" stands for "Albany"--Davis) at "210 1/2 N. Oak Avenue." The business cannot be found in the 1909 or 1914 Polk's Directories. However, the 1914 Polk's Directory shows a Dr. Davis as living at 514 East Throckmorton [presently, in 2014, NE 1st Street] with his wife, Helen. The name of the bath house was changed to the "Buck Head" (or "Buckhead", as some sources have it) at some as yet unknown date.
Date: 1920?
Item Type: Photograph

[The Dam/causeway]

Description: This picture shows the dam that formed Mineral Wells' first municipal water reservoir. This dam is probably the one that Thelma Doss refers to on page 51 of A.F. Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells." Its erection was credited to banker Cicero Smith in that article. Located southeast of the Cullen Grimes School, it is in the G. P. Barber Addition. The lake was actually built by George P Barber, and the water impounded behind it is known locally as Barber Lake. The lake served to supply water for Mineral Wells until banker Cicero Smith and Ed Dismuke (owner of Famous Water Company) built a dam on Pollard Creek, west of the city, to form Mineral Wells' second municipal water supply, Lake Pinto. The original photograph is one of 17 (4 X 4) negatives that were discovered in an envelope from Charles W. Simonds (Route 5, Box 43, Norman, Oklahoma, 73069), postmarked "Aug. 4, 1975" and addressed to A.F. Weaver Photography. Some telephone numbers were visible on the envelope, as was the remark: "Father - C.W. Simonds (Clarence Winfield)."
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[The Cumberland Presbyterian Church]

Description: Shown here is a picture of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. On the back of picture is written "901 N.Oak [.] Sold to Church of Christ [.] Demolished and rebuilt." The streetcar tracks, which ran from 1907 to 1913 are visible on N. Oak in front of the church. The denomination takes its name from Cumberland Street, Philadelphia. A sub-sect of Presbyterianism--based on an Arminian interpretation of Calvinism--was begun at the church there. A Cumberland Presbyterian church is advertised as being in Newberry at the present [2014] time. The picture was taken before North Oak Avenue was paved in 1914. The Church of Christ still [2008] occupies this location on N. Oak Avenue.
Date: 1907/1913?
Item Type: Photograph

The Dam and Pinto Lake

Description: This picture appears on page 81 of the Second Edition of "Time Was..." The book states that the lake today [2008] is dry, and owned by C. R. Upham, Jr.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[The Crazy Well Drinking Pavilion]

Description: This is a picture of the second Crazy Water Well Drinking Pavilion. The original Crazy Well and first Drinking Pavilion are housed in the small building in the middle of the picture immediately in front of the larger second Pavilion. This picture of the wooden structure was taken shortly after its construction in 1900. Notice the dirt roads, and the burros tied at the hitching rail. Burro rides on trails around town, especially up East Mountain, were a very popular form of recreation in Mineral Wells' early years. Customers are seen entering the upper floor by an exterior flight of stairs.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

Colonial Hotel

Description: The Colonial Hotel at 115 W. Hubbard Street was built by rancher J.T. Holt for his second wife, who would not live in the country. The hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch about 1917, and its name was changed to The Damron Hotel. The popular hotel burned down December 22, 1975 along with several other adjoining businesses.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[The City Nestled Among the Hills]

Description: This picture was taken from East Mountain, from a site above and left (south) of the former Chautauqua (1905-1912.) Note the Crazy Water Hotel at the left edge of the picture (which opened in 1927 on the corner of North Oak and NW 3rd Streets.) Note also the Nazareth Hospital built by the Crazy Corporation, behind and right of the Crazy. The back of the "WELCOME" (1921 vintage) sign on the south end of this mountain and facing south, is at the immediate middle foreground. This sign was the world's largest non-commercial electric lighted sign when it was donated to the city in 1922 following a Rotary Club of Texas convention. The sign is reputed by local folklore to be the inspiration for the more publicized "HOLLYWOOD" sign in Los Angeles, California. It is much larger than the photograph suggests. Lesser known sites in the picture are The Hawthorn Drinking Pavilion one block north (right) of Nazareth Hospital and the Crazy Theater, across Oak Avenue, at the right and front of the Crazy.
Date: 1927
Item Type: Photograph

[Children With Bicycle and Hoop,]

Description: Dated "Jan 10, 1919", this picture was contained in an envelope postmarked "Aug. 4 '75", and addressed to A. F. Weaver Photography from Charles W. [Windell] Simonds. Handwriting on the envelope indicates it was from a short-wave "Ham' radio operator correspondent and friend of Mr. Weaver. Notes on the envelope indicate the picture was probably taken by the correspondent's father, Clarence Winfield Simonds. The sign on the tree at the left edge of the picture indicates this was the Vance Villa (Rooming House) in a residential part of town. (Vance Villa is listed in the 1914 City Director of Mineral Wells at 811 N. College, which is now NW 5th Avenue.) Note the hoop held by the child on the left, while the boy on the right appears to be holding a unicycle--or, perhaps, an early bicycle whose rear wheel is not visible..
Date: January 10, 1919
Item Type: Photograph

[A Corner of Oak Avenue and East Hubbard Street]

Description: This picture shows the northeast corner of the intersection of Hubbard Street (US Hwy. 180) and Oak Avenue (US Hwy. 281), the center of downtown Mineral Wells. In this picture are The First State Bank, The Gentleman's Closet, and Lorene's Fabrics. The First State Bank began at this location, with Leon Cowan as president and Tony Street and Leon Groves as vice-presidents. The City National Bank was once located here, but moved to their new location at 1900 E. Hubbard Street. The Gentleman's Closet and Lorene's Fabrics occupied a newly-remodeled building to the right (east) of the bank. George's Men's Shop was one of the businesses in the building across Oak Avenue to the left and west of the First State Bank.
Date: 1989?
Item Type: Photograph

[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 1 of 3, The Baker Hotel is in the Background]

Description: This series of photographs was taken in 1975, during the construction of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan at 101 SE 1st Avenue. The Howard Brothers Department Store was an early occupant of the site. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975 to make room for the Savings and Loan. A new First State Bank currently [2011] occupies this entire city block. A good view of the south side of the Baker Hotel is visible in the background.
Date: 1975
Item Type: Photograph

[The Convention Hall, Built in 1925]

Description: This photograph shows the Convention Hall, which was built in 1925 to accommodate the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. The lack of signage on the front of the building--along with copious bunting--suggests that the photograph was taken at its dedication. The picture is featured in "Time There Once was", page 164. The Convention Hall was demolished in 1976.
Date: 1925
Item Type: Photograph

[The Crazy Box Factory Crew 1940]

Description: A. F. Weaver, Sr. (seated on the left) raised money--just before World War II--to build the new building just behind the Crazy Box Factory. He is pictured here with the staff of the building. The Polluck Paper and Box Company took over the plant right after the war. It later became the St. Regis Packaging. The photograph dates to about 1940.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[Dedication of W.P (Bill) Cameron Mounument: Sen. Tom Creighton Speaks]

Description: Texas State Senator Tom Creighton delivers the keynote address at the dedication of a memorial marker to W.P. (Bill) Cameron at the "Little Rock Schoolhouse" Museum. Mr. Cameron was the Editor of the Mineral Wells Index newspaper, and an active and popular participant in local civic and social events. After his death, his family placed a marker in his honor at the museum. Members of Mr. Cameron's family are seated to the speaker's left, and the Junior High Ensemble, Director Vicki Carden, are on the museum steps behind and to the speaker's right, Please contact the collection webmaster if you recognize other persons in the picture. The marker has been removed, and its location is not known at this time.[see previous photographs for more details.] Very dimly visible in an enlarged photo, inside the open door of the museum, is an original five-pointed wooden star that decorated a gable of the historic Hexagon House Hotel.
Date: April 14, 1978
Creator: Weaver, A. F.
Item Type: Photograph

[The Carlsbad Well: Second Building]

Description: Shown here is a picture of the second Carlsbad Well building, as it appeared around 1915. The stained glass windows are shown installed, and the "Ben Hur" street car tracks have been removed. This picture appears in Weaver, A. F., "TIME WAS ...", 1st Edition, on page 63. The original Carlsbad Pavilion was on the northeast corner of NW 1st Avenue and NW 6th Street, directly across the street west of the Crazy Drinking Pavilion. The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway provided a gasoline-powered motor car, a "Dinky Car", which provided service every 1/4 hour to Lake Pinto from 1903 to 1909. The "Ben Hur" was the last and largest of the "Dinky Cars" whose tracks, on NW 1st Street, passed the Carlsbad pavilion and turned west on NW 6th Street. The El Paso Morning Times of 1909 reports that the construction of the second Texas Carlsbad building will cost about $40,000. The equivalent sum in modern dollars is not known. The new building was to be "50 x 130 feet. It will be fire proof [sic] and steam heat [sic]." The building was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for the Crazy Laundry and Dry Cleaning after the drinking pavilion was closed in the 1930's.
Date: 1915?
Item Type: Photograph

[The Carlsbad Well: First Building]

Description: The first Carlsbad Well drinking pavilion was built about 1895. The Carlsbad (also known as the Texas Carlsbad Well), one of the early drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells, was located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, directly across the street and west of the first Crazy Well pavilion. The Carlsbad slogan was: "Makes a man love HIS [sic] wife/ Makes a wife love HER [sic] husband/ Robs the divorce court of its business/ Takes the temper out of red-headed people/ Puts ginger into ginks/ And pepper into plodders." The pavilion was prominent in several pictures around the turn of the century; this picture--labeled "Sept. 19/07" in ink--was from an advertisement by the Yeager Drug Company. This early pavilion had been demolished by 1911, and replaced by a larger brick structure.
Date: September 19, 1907
Item Type: Photograph

Carlsbad Well, Mineral Wells, Texas

Description: The Texas Carlsbad Well, located at 415 NW 1st Avenue (west of the Crazy Water Well and Drinking Pavilion), is shown here. A more modern brick building was added to this wooden pavilion in 1909; both structures are visible in pictures taken during a Woodmen of the World convention in 1911. (Note: The newer Carlsbad building was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for its Laundry and Dry Cleaning when the second Carlsbad Pavilion shut down operations during World War II.)
Date: 1910?
Item Type: Photograph

Carlsbad Well

Description: This picture, dated September 19, 1907, shows the Carlsbad Well at 415 NW 1st Avenue, and west of the Crazy Well drinking pavilion. It was one of the first drinking pavilions in Mineral Wells, and boasted that the water "Makes a man love HIS [sic] wife, makes a wife love HER [sic] husband/ Robs the divorce court of its business/ Takes the temper out of red-headed people/ Puts ginger into ginks/ and pepper into plodders."
Date: September 19, 1907
Item Type: Photograph

The Carlisle House, Mineral Wells Texas

Description: The Carlisle House was once located at 316 NW 3rd Avenue, and NW 4th Street. It filled a quarter of the block, and, with sixty rooms, was one of the largest hotels in Mineral Wells. It owned and managed by Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Emmett Carlisle. Mr. Carlisle died in 1911, but his widow continued to manage the hotel. The hotel met its doom in a fire that consumed six hotels and seven dwellings during its rampage. The conflagration was so thorough that the location was still empty in 1921. The Nazareth Hospital as eventually built in this location. The architecture is possibly best described as an eclectic mix of Queen Anne and Prairie styles, the latter perhaps reflecting additions to the original building. [For further details, please see the picture labeled "Carlisle House, Mineral Wells, Texas."]
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[The Burning of the Crazy Flats]

Description: The "Crazy Flats" drinking pavilion, with rooms for rent, replaced a two-story Crazy Water drinking pavilion in 1909. The first Crazy Hotel was built in 1912, and an annex was added to it in 1914. A fire in the Drug Store of the "Crazy Flats" (SE corner of the Crazy Flats building) on March 15, 1925, destroyed the entire Crazy block. The "New", completely rebuilt, Crazy Hotel was enlarged to cover the entire block. It opened in 1927, and replaced all of the burned buildings. The new building was promoted as fireproof, since it was built with solid cement walls and ceilings. The former "new Crazy Hotel" had a colorful past that included a daily radio show originating in its Lobby and broadcast nationally over TQN (the Texas Quality Network). It had survived the Great Depression of the 'thirties, World War I, the Korean "Police Action", and the Viet Nam War.
Date: March 15, 1925
Item Type: Photograph

"Where the Famous Crystals Are Made"

Description: This is a photograph of a building with a sign that says, "Famous Mineral Wells Crystal Plant." There is a hill, covered in trees, behind the building. Writing at the bottom of the image reads: "Where Famous Crystals Are Made." Ed Dismuke, a druggist from Waco, came to Mineral Wells for his health after his family physician told him he only had a "short time" to live. After miraculously regaining his health, which he credited to the mineral waters of his new hometown, he sold water by the drink at the Damron Hotel, later opening his own company, The Famous Water Company. He also opened The Famous Mineral Crystal Plant on the east side of Lake Pinto in partnership with local banker Cicero Smith. The two also organized The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway with its two gasoline-powered "dinky cars" named "Esther" and "Susie" after Smith's daughters. This is a picture of the plant where Famous Crystals, labeled "Pronto Lax" were made. Dismuke had outlived the doctors who had told him he only had a short time to live when he died at the age of ninety-four.
Date: 1905?
Item Type: Photograph