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ABOUT BROWSE FEED
[The First Mayor of Incorporated Mineral Wells]
Judge J. A. Lynch bought eighty acres, laid out the city of Mineral Wells, and was its first self-appointed Mayor. The city itself incorporated in 1882, and Jim ("J. E."--the "E." is for "Edward") Laverty (1850-1934) became the first Mayor (and the first City Marshall) of the newly-incorporated Mineral Wells. Mineral Wells adopted a change of charter in 1894; and a new corporation was formed, which elected G. C. Green the next mayor of this new corporation. Laverty moved to Carlsbad, New Mexico in 1900 (at age 50), which city he tried to tout as a spa, like Mineral Wells. The famous caverns at Carlsbad were explored in 1901, and made into a national treasure. He married Mary Ann Cowden (1853-1924), and he had three children: Mary Eula Laverty (1879-1969), Roberta (Berta) Laverty (1879-1962), and Edward Franklin Laverty (1883-1956)., This picture shows him and his dog in 1882. He died, and he was buried at Carlsbad in 1934, after serving two terms as mayor, and 23 years as City Treasurer and tax collector.
[Photograph of Inspiration Point]
Photograph of view from Inspiration Point, overlooking the Brazos River seven miles south of Mineral Wells.
[Photograph of View from West Mountain]
Photograph taken after the Chautauqua was demolished (that is, about 1912). The foundation can be seen in the upper right quadrant. The Post Office, completed in 1913, is visible to the right of the Chautauqua ruins. The old viewing tower on the top of the hill, destroyed by a tornado in 1930, is just barely visible in the trees on top of the hill. The first Crazy Hotel and Crazy Flats drinking pavilion, which burned in 1925, are seen one block northwest of the Post Office. The Murphy home is on top of the hill in the middle of the photograph. The Hexagon Hotel (torn down in 1959) is just above and left of the center. The Vichy Well is just to the right of the Hexagon House, and is now the location of the North Oak Community Center. In the the next block north (left) of the Hexagon House, facing west, is the Fairfield Inn with a ground-level entrance on each floor. Note the city's water tower at left center.
[Photograph of The Piedmont Hotel]
Photograph of the Piedmont Hotel, located on NE 2nd Avenue and East Hubbard Street, was demolished to make room for the Baker Hotel Garage. Before its destruction, it was used as an office for the Army Engineers during the construction of Possum Kingdom Dam.
[Photograph of the Street Car to Elmhurst Park]
Photograph of a streetcar about to enter Elmhurst Park by way of North Oak Street.
[Photograph of Lover's Retreat]
Photograph of small group of people sitting on a large rock on the north bank of Eagle Creek, reflected in the water of the swimming hole at Lover's Retreat.
[Newspaper Clipping of Mineral Wells School, Texas]
A newspaper clipping with a photograph of a Mineral Wells School. This clipping had been mounted in a scrapbook, and the legible portion of the caption says, "Mineral Wells School, Texas." The whole caption read: Mineral Wells College. [sic]--A School for Both Sexes The building, which the Weatherford Democrat of September 12, 1895 says would be built in Mineral Wells (It would have been in Romanesque architecture), was to offer "Classical, Scientific, English, Music, Elocution, and Art Courses" . Professor J. McCracken was the head of the school. The building was never built, because the state provided education up to (but not including) college. A need for further education was not felt. .
[Panoramic Photograph of Mineral Wells]
Photograph of a panoramic view of northwest Mineral Wells from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain. Included in photograph are the Convention Center, the Box Factory, and the Crazy Water Hotel.
Oak Street, Mineral Wells, Texas
This picture purports to show North Oak Avenue,(the photograph reads "Oak Street")of Mineral Wells, Texas,in the 100 block--looking north. The Mineral Wells Electric Railway operated from 1907 to 1913, and streets were paved in 1914. Visible are: A horse-drawn hack with passengers, a streetcar, automobiles, numerous people on sidewalks, and businesses along the street. The streetcar (Apparently working on air: The electric line required to power it is nowhere in sight)is passing the Poston Dry Goods store on its right. The Hexagon Hotel (opened December 1897)is possibly visible in the distance. A steeple is barely visible on the skyline at the left (west) side of the street.
[The Palo Pinto County Fair Parade of 1912]
The Palo Pinto County Fair Parade of 1912 is shown, with a horse-drawn float, more horses, an automobile and people in parade. The "Queens Float" featured Queen Apolline Dow of Oran. The outriders were Ferdinand Dow, Ernest Clark, John T. Bowman. Maids of Honor were Alma Herndon, Carrie Stephenson, Ruby Johnson, Mae Belle Smith, Nina Mae Haynes and Cleo Frost. The parade is shown moving south in the 200 block of North Oak Street. (Please note the tracks of the trolley system, which operated from 1907 to 1913.)
[Photograph of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
Photograph of a view of Mineral Wells, taken from East Mountain, looking southwest. Poston Dry Goods is shown in the left foreground); the First Baptist Church (upper right); the Dr. A.W. Thompson residence in middle foreground, with Mineral Wells Sanatorium to its right (west).
[Penitentiary Hollow]
This is a photograph of a woman and young boy (both of them unidentified) posing among the tall rock formations at Penitentiary Hollow in Lake Mineral Wells State Park.
A July Crowd
This photograph,labeled "A July Crowd", shows a ladies' gathering about 1920. The photograph shows what is possibly a tea party or a ladies' club meeting. Some of the ladies shown were members of prominent Mineral Wells families. Identified in a typed note - and graph - accompanying the photograph are: (starting at back left) the 4th lady is Mrs. D. G. Galbraith [wife of the owner of the Hexagon House], the 8th is Mrs. E. F. Yeager [wife of Dr. E.F. Yeager, Pharmacist/ Owner of the Lion Drug Store), 16th is Mrs. J.H. McCracken [wife Dr. J.H. McCracken, president of the Texas Medical Association], 17th may be Mrs. Raines (Mrs. McCracken's mother); (middle row, starting in front of Mrs. Yeager) the second from left is Mrs. Dr. Beeler; (first row from left) the 3rd lady may be Mrs. Coon, the 6th lady is Mrs. Paul Bock, the 8th is Mrs. Reba Williams. The children in front are Langdon Bock on the left and Elizabeth Galbraith on the right. There were forty people in total.
[A Love Story of Mineral Wells]
This photograph appears to be a fragment of the cover of an advertising booklet that includes the fiction "A Love Story of Mineral Wells", by Mamie Wynn Cox. Her fiction was first published in 1911. Four libraries worldwide claim possession of a copy of it. The complete booklet is available by flipping through the page by selecting "next" above the photographs. The cover shows a lady holding a handful of dominoes, which was probably meant to establish a connection to Mineral Wells, Dominoes once being a popular pastime in the city. The game of 42 (named after the number of points that could be scored in a game) was invented in Garner, seven miles east of Mineral Wells. For readers interested in obtaining a copy of the fiction, the Dewey Number of it is 833; the Library of Congress Call Number is PS 3505.O97
[Construction of the Malsby Dairy]
Construction of the Malsby Dairy is shown here, going on apace. Steel girders are being put in place, presumably to support a future roof. It was located at 300 SE 1st Street. Construction began (it is conjectured) in the late 1940's. The building once housed a newspaper (in the 1960's) called "The Advance", and then the "Mineral Wells Index." The "Index" still [2007] occupies the building. Please note that only half of the men in the picture are shown wearing hard hats. Please note also the derrick mounted on the back of a truck. A hand-written legend on the photograph reads: "Malsby Creamery"
Medical Facts for Pilots
This pamphlet gives an overview of information for pilots to maintain good health and recognize warning signs of problems they might face specific to flying.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 18 of 21: Individual in Front of the Burning Hotel]
The Damron Hotel, built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort, burned completely on December 22, 1975. Shown here is another view of the front entrance to the hotel as flames burst through the front wall of the building. The gesturing individual with the hard hat has not been identified.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 21 of 21: An Early Stage, Looking East, Smoke Billowing]
Here is a view of the Damron Hotel (formerly located at 109 W. Hubbard Street)during the early stages of the fire (on December 22, 1975) that completely destroyed it. It was a popular hotel during the heyday of Mineral Wells--through the "Roaring Twenties", the Great Depression and World War II.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 16 of 21: Black Smoke Billowing Over Businesses]
Shown here is another view of the huge column of black smoke accompanying the Damron Hotel fire that completely destroyed the hotel on December 22, 1975. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard Street, and the spectacular fire that destroyed it received extensive photographic coverage. Ammunition (Presumably from the hardware store next to the hotel) explosions could be heard all downtown. Even though the explosions provided a hazard to fire fighters, no major injuries were reported.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 17 of 21: Two Individuals on the Street Northwest of the Fire]
Shown here is another view of the plume of thick black smoke at the height of the fire that completely destroyed the Damron Hotel December 22, 1975, along with two hard-hatted individuals (presumably fire-fighters) standing in the street. It was a very popular hotel during the mineral water industry's heyday through the "Roaring Twenties", Great Depression and World War II. By the time of the fire, however, one informant remarked--verbally--that no respectable lady permitted herself to be found within a block of the hotel. Sic transit, it would appear, gloria mundi.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 6 of 21: Bystanders Observing the Fire]
The Damron Hotel was destroyed (on December 22, 1975) in a spectacular fire that received extensive photographic coverage. The hotel was located at 109 W. Hubbard. This is another picture of that immense conflagration. All the firemen answered a call that came in at 9:08 on the morning of the fire. The City of Weatherford also sent men and equipment over to help. Volunteers who were not themselves firemen also helped. Other buildings that suffered damage were Pemberton's (an appliance store across the street and west of the hotel), and the hardware store (Bought by Bob Sturtivant) next to the hotel. Note the height of the flames in this picture taken in the later stages of the fire.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 3 of 21: Baker Hotel in Background]
The Damron Hotel (very popular in the resort city of Mineral Wells through the periods of the "Roaring Twenties", The Great Depression and World War II) was originally built as The Colonial Hotel in 1906 by J.T. Holt. Mr. Holt also owned a hardware store at the back of the hotel facing S. Oak Avenue, and a one-room buggy showroom between the hardware store and the hotel. The hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron around 1917 in exchange for a ranch, and the name was changed to reflect the new ownership. Mr. Holt sold the hardware store to his manager, John Davidson. The Damron Hotel and Davidson Hardware burned completely on December 22, 1975. This picture of the fire was taken looking east on Hubbard Street. The Baker Hotel in the left middle of the photograph is to the north of most of the smoke.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 11 of 21: Fighting the Fire on W. Hubbard St.]
Shown here is another picture in the series of photographs of the fire that destroyed the Damron Hotel during the holiday season of 1975. This smoke-shrouded scene of W. Hubbard, shows the front entrance to the hotel in the earlier stages of the fire's progress. The Damron was built in 1906, during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort spa. It burned completely on December 22,1975. The hotel's name was changed in 1917 when Mr. Holt (who had built the hotel) traded it to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. It was a very popular hotel through the "Roaring Twenties", the Great Depression and World War II.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 4 of 21, Fire Inside the Structure]
This is another view of the spectacular fire that consumed the Damron Hotel on December 22, 1975. The hotel was built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife. The name was changed in 1917 when the hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. The fire received extensive photographic coverage. Note the height of the flames in this picture, taken in the later stages of the fire.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 2 of 21: View South/Southeast ]
The Colonial Hotel was built in 1906 by Mr. J. T. Holt for his second wife. Mr. Holt also owned a hardware store on S. Oak at the back of the hotel. The name of the hotel was changed to The Damron Hotel around 1917 when Mr. Holt traded it to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. A hardware store, hard by, was sold to Mr. Holt's manager, John Davidson. The Damron Hotel, located at 109 W. Hubbbard Street, along with Davidson Hardware, burned completely on December 22, 1975. Please note the Christmas decoration, symbol of the season, on the telephone pole above the fire truck. The main entrance to the hotel is faintly visible through the dense smoke to the rear of the fire truck. The Crazy Hotel can be seen at the lower left edge of the picture.
Texas Trade Review
An early street scene showing buildings and a horse-drawn wagon. Written in lower left corner is "Texas Trade Review." The sign over the sidewalk reads "D.M. Howard." There were several D.M. Howard stores (see page 122 in "Time Was...", second edition). This scene was probably on Mesquite Street in the 100 block. It is undated, but the unpaved road, and the horse-drawn wagon, suggest the latter part of the nineteenth century.
[Mineral Wells' First Police Department]
Mineral Wells' first Police Department is shown on horseback here. On the far left is Jim Barrett, Chief, and in the middle is Paul Granbury. The man on the right remains unknown. This photograph comes from A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", page 153. The picture appears to have been taken at the photographer's souvenir picture stand on the donkey trail about halfway up East Mountain. J. C. McClure, an early photographer, first owned the donkeys for the trail; but he was killed while riding a wild stallion on Oak Avenue. J. L. Young and his wife took over the photographer's stand. They built a rock house, here as a background, for souvenir pictures. In 1895, a policeman (C.M. Harris) was appointed as City Marshall." A night watchman (A. Scott) was also appointed. Their respective duties were primarily fire prevention and keeping livestock from roaming the streets; and seeing to it that businesses were properly locked up. Boys under the age of 17 were forbidden from roaming the streets at night (under pain of a $10 fine). C.M. Harris was elected to his position in 1896, at a salary of $60 per month. In 1889, upon the sudden death of Frank Johnson, Harris was appointed Interim Marshall to "Inspect and supervise all premises and places of business." J.I. Johnson became night watchmen at the salary of $12.50, and he was charged with roaming the streets at nights to be on the lookout for fire. The City Marshall was expected to corral any stray dogs--and kill them if they were unclaimed. He was to remove the carcasses from the city limits afterwards. in 19001, an ordinance was passed forbidding the possession of pigeons in the city--the control of which fell to the City Marshall. [Note: Several kinds of dove ...
[Photograph of Suspension Bridge Over the Brazos River]
This is a photograph of a suspension bridge being built over the Brazos river near the town of Brazos, in Palo Pinto county. Three adults and a child in early twentieth-century clothes are obscurely visible in the lower left-center. The view is looking east.
[Photograph of Suspension Bridge Over the Brazos River]
Here is a photograph of a suspension bridge being built over the Brazos River near the town of Brazos, in Palo Pinto County. Printed in the corner of the mount is "A Photographic Souvenir from Mineral Wells, the Great Health and Pleasure Resort of Texas."
[Photograph of New Suspension Bridge at Lover's Retreat]
This is a photograph of a suspension bridge for pedestrian traffic across Eagle Creek at Lover's Retreat. Formerly a public park, and now on private property, it was located four miles west of Palo Pinto on the old Bankhead Highway (now U.S. Highway 180).
[The Mineral Wells Mounted Police]
A copy of a newspaper clipping, the caption identifies members of the Mineral Wells Mounted Police "57 years ago." Identified are: "Uncle Billy Wood" on his white horse (not a member of the force); Bob Pate; Paul Craig; Jim Barrett, probably Chief of Police at the time; Paul Granbury. All are reported to be deceased at time of printing. The picture was furnished to the paper courtesy Mrs. Paul Granbury. The sign on the building at the far left of the picture has been tentatively identified as a Livery Stable. Though the sign is visible, the distance has made its contents extremely obscure. The first city hall was located at the corner of First Avenue and Third Street, with a fence to hold impounded livestock. The rounding up of stray livestock was the primary duty of the mounted police in 1910. Two more more individuals were also forbidden to fight in public; no-one was permitted to use obscene language; playing cards for liquor. The renting of houses for the playing of cards was also forbidden. Teams were not allowed to be unhitched while attached to wagons, and vagrants were fined $10- In short, the police team were kept busy. These details are taken from "The Mineral wells Police Department 1882-1988" by Kaye Ashby, in the custody of the Boyce Ditto Library.
[Photograph of Suspension Bridge over Brazos River]
this is a photograph of suspension bridge being built over the Brazos river near the town of Brazos, in Palo Pinto county. The view is looking west. An inscription on the mounting of the photograph reads: "A Photographic Souvenir from Mineral Wells, the Great Health and Pleasure Resort of Texas."
[Twenty Men and One Woman in Front of a Building]
Illustrated here are 20 unidentified men (some in uniform) and 1 unidentified woman standing in front of an unidentified building. Four of the men have removed their hats. The prevalence of uniforms suggests either the military or the police. The high boots worn by two of the men (and the hats that some of the have), the dress of the woman all suggest an early 1930's date for the photograph. The occasion that brought them to that place is not known. The photograph taken by Young's Studio of Mineral Wells, Texas.
[The Texas Carlsbad Well Slogan]
A picture of the slogan posted in the Texas Carlsbad Well pavilion with "proof" that a Cadillac, with its radiator filled with mineral water, was rejuvenated with enough "pep" to pass a Chevrolet. Please note: The first Cadillac V-8 engine was introduced in 1914 as the 'Type 51' engine, so this photograph may be dated to 1914 or thereafter. The "Over" section is not illustrated. It probably contained more braggadocio.
[Two Women in Wylie Park]
Two women (one using an umbrella as a parasol) are pictured strolling in Wylie Park. Notes on back of the photograph read: "Corner of N. Oak and N.E. 1st Street, the West side of Wylie Park, a popular place for strolling." North Oak Avenue is in background, with North to the right in the picture. Hazelwood Drugs is on the west side of Oak Ave, opposite the park. Mineral Wells. The streets of Mineral Wells were paved in the summer of 1914. A wagon can be seen traveling north on Oak Avenue. What appears to be a work crew may be seen at the corner indicates that the finishing touches may have been in the process of being applied to the paving as the picture was taken.
Souvenir...Mineral Wells Volunteer Fire Department
Shown here is the cover of a souvenir booklet about the Mineral Wells, Texas, Volunteer Fire Department,published in 1906.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 9 of 21: Firemen and a Fire Truck Near the North Side of Budiling]
This photograph shows another view of the early response to the holiday conflagration that consumed the Damron Hotel on December 22, 1975. The Damron was built in 1906, during Mineral Wells' heyday as a popular resort city. Originally named the Colonial Hotel by J. T. Holt, and built for his second wife, the name of the hotel was changed in 1917 when Mr. Holt traded the hotel to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. The hotel was located at 109 W. Hubbard, and the spectacular fire received extensive photographic coverage.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 8 of 21: An Early Stage of the Fire, Looking North]
This view of the spectacular holiday [Christmas] fire that consumed the Damron Hotel completely on December 22, 1975, was taken from SW 1st Street at the southwest corner of the block in the early stages of the fire. The Damron Hotel was built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by J. T. Holt for his second wife. She adamantly refused to live in the country. The name was changed in 1917 when it was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard. The fire received extensive photographic coverage.
[A Panorama Taken in 1974 (first)]
Shown here is a panoramic View of Mineral Wells, Texas taken August 8, 1974. The Baker Hotel and the Crazy Water Hotel are visible. The Convention Center is seen in the far left of the photograph. The view is from West Mountain, looking toward East Mountain over north Mineral Wells.
[A View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
A view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain looking west along NW 3rd Street is shown here. Visible landmarks include: The first Crazy Water Hotel, (built in two sections in 1911 and 1912) with its common lobby entrance on NW 3rd Street; the U.S. Post Office in the left foreground; the first Roman Catholic Church on the side of West Mountain at NW 3rd Street; Mineral Wells High School; West Ward School in the gap between West and South Mountains; and the Presbyterian Church on NW 2nd Street, one block northeast of West Ward School.
[A View of Mineral Wells from East Mountain]
A view from East Mountain, looking down on Mineral Wells and taken about 1910, includes: The First United Methodist Church, the Yeager Building, and the train depot in the background. This photograph was taken before the Baker Hotel was built.
[Dr. J.H. McCracken Home, 2 of 3]
The Dr. J.H. McCracken home built in 1904 at 516 West Hubbard Street. It was restored by Gil Hull. Joseph Hill McCracken was born on a farm near Springtown, Texas, October 1, 1867. He graduated from the University of Tennessee Medical School in 1891, and returned to Texas. On October 15, 1895, he married Marie Sue Wilson, the daughter of Oliver Loving's youngest daughter, Margaret. He was elected President of the Texas Medical Association in 1911, and practiced medicine in Mineral Wells for over fifty years. He frequently laughed about having "delivered babies of babies of babies." Dr. McCracken died in March of 1954, and his wife died in November of 1955. Both are buried in Mineral Wells' Woodland Park Cemetery. Professor John N, McCracken, who established the Mineral Wells College directly across the street west of the McCracken home, is believed to be Dr. McCracken's father. It is presently [2016] the offices of Brown and Ford, attorneys-at-law. [For details of the Mineral Wells College, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School, Texas."]
[Confiscated Whiskey Stills]
Nick Chandler & Gib Abernathy, officials of the government, have detected (and presumably are about to destroy) illegal whiskey distilling apparatus confiscated during the Great Depression of the 1930's, when Prohibition was regnant. The lack of a "Thumper" barrel between the distilling apparatus and the worm suggests that these "Stills" were probably amateur operations. Abernathy was the Palo Pinto County Sheriff at the time, and also the father of Bill Ray Abernathy.
[First State Bank & Trust]
Shown here is an interior view of the First State Bank & Trust Company, later known as the State National Bank, located at 102 East Hubbard. This bank was organized in 1906, and it opened on April 17, 1906. It became the State National Bank in 1925. The First National Bank was merged with the State National Bank in 1931. The official name of the institution became First National Bank in 1955. At the desk is H. N. Frost, then president. Standing is W. I. Smith, Vice-President & cashier. The teller is unidentified. The photograph was taken 1921. Note the cuspidors in each corner. It is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 147.
[First State Bank and The Gentlemen's Closet]
This photograph has been tentatively dated to the 1980's. Notice the mailbox at the corner--a rarity in Mineral Wells at the present [2013] time. The street appears to be devoid of markings. The picture shows the First State Bank, which began business at the southwest corner of the 100 block of East Hubbard with a drive-in teller and parking lot at the back of the bank. The First State Bank president was Leon Cowan; vice-presidents were Tony Street and Leon Groves. The First State Bank occupied the northeast corner of N. Oak Avenue and E. Hubbard Streets after The City National Bank (now First Financial Bank) moved from here to its current [2008] location at 1900 W. Hubbard Street. First State Bank is now [2008] located at 101 SE 1st Avenue. The building now [2013] houses the offices for the Mineral Wells Hospice. The Gentleman's Closet, next door, was a man's haberdashery. It was a remodeled store that had been occupied by a number of previous businesses. It is presently [2013] vacant.
[First Presbyterian Church, 13 of 13 : South Side]
The third in a series of thirteen pictures of the First Presbyterian Church. This picture shows details of the south side of the church.
[The Front entrance to the second First Presbyterian Church]
This picture of the main entrance to the second First Presbyterian Church at 300 NW 4th Avenue, Mineral Wells, shows the unique dome that topped the picturesque structure. The church survived the disastrous fire of July 4, 1914, that destroyed about six city blocks surrounding it. Foundation structural damage caused the church to be replaced by a more modern structure in the 1980's. This picture is one of 43 negatives in the A. F. Weaver Collection showing construction details of the Lutheran and Presbyterian churches.
[Hell's Gate]
An old channel of the Brazos River cut a gap in a sandstone formation in the Possum Kingdom area. Water from the impounded Possum Kingdom Lake covered the area and created this spectacular scene when the Morris Shepard Dam was built by the W.P.A. for flood control in the late 1930's. For a feel of the magnitude of the vista, please note the two-story home atop the cliff to the right of the photograph.
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]
A home at 401 NW 4th Avenue taken June 1974 is illustrated here. The house was built by P.E. Bock, in what appears to be Colonial Revival style.
[A House at 401 NW 4th Avenue]
This picture gives a better view of the house shown in the succeeding photograph. It was taken in June of 1974. The house was built by P.E. Bock.