Boyce Ditto Public Library - 1,381 Matching Results

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[The Lion's Club Womanless Wedding]

Description: The Lion's Club presented an annual comedy skit known as a "Womanless Wedding." This one took place about 1940, and appears on page 119 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells," First edition, 1974, by A. F. Weaver. He identifies the men as, "Standing in back: G. Ritchie, Weaver, B. Joiner, B. Holmes, ?, N. Glenn, J. McGaha. Middle row: F. Brewer, ?, H. Cohen, ?. Front row seated: G. Johnson, ?, L. Gambrell, ?, C. Lodal, N. Carlock, ?, M. Mullins."
Date: unknown

The John Moore Home, 1911, 2 of 2: Interior

Description: An inscription on photograph reads: "(John Moore Home) 1911." The original builder was Hugh Coleman. John Moore occupied the house at a later date. Please note the period dress and furniture. The names of the people pictured are not known. This photograph appears to show a house now located at 915 NW 4th Avenue.
Date: unknown

[The Lazine Home]

Description: This picture illustrates the John and Gracie Lazine home, located at the corner of S. Oak Avenue and SW 7th Street. The Lazines had three boys, Oscar, O.D., and Olen, and two girls, Evelyn and Dora. The Lazines were quite prominent in the community. This photograph appears on page 183 of A.F. Weaver's "Time Was...", Second Edition.
Date: unknown

Ex- Confederates, Mineral Wells Camp No. 772

Description: No information is available about this photograph, other than inscription "Ex. Confederates Min. Wells Camp no. 772" written in white or silver ink. There are twenty-three men in the picture (16 standing, 7 kneeling) apparently taken on NE 1st Street, beside the rock-constructed Yeager Drug Store. The apparent ages of the men indicates they were probably surviving veterans of the Civil War, either living in Mineral Wells or attending a convention here. The photograph is mounted on cardboard.
Date: unknown

The Kingsley

Description: The Kingsley was built on the side of East Mountain around NW 7th Street, and was eventually destroyed by fire. The legend "The Kinglsey, Mineral Wells Texa." invites comentary, as "Texa" is not a proper abbreviation for "Texas." This photograph appears on page 102 of A. F. Weaver's pictorial history book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells..." Second Edition, 1988.
Date: unknown

[The First Air-Mail Service to Mineral Wells]

Description: The first batch of airmail arrived in Mineral Wells, 1947, 6:30 pm. Individuals from left are: John Chamberlain, Manager of the Chamber of Commerce, Fred Parnell, Bill Cameron, of the Index, Fred Brown, Manager of the Baker Hotel, Mayor John Miller, an unidentified pilot, D.C. Harris, Postmaster (holding the mail bag) and R. T. Jones. The airplane in the background, a Cessna 190, was probably the one used to transport the mail. It appeared to be a cold day, as the officials are all wearing coats. (A negative accompanying this picture depicted a "Christmas rush at the old Post Office")
Date: 1947

[Judge J. A. Lynch]

Description: . This picture,of Judge J. A. Lynch (1827-1920), founder of Mineral Wells, Texas, may be found published on page 32 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. It is taken from a painting that is owned by the Lynch family, and executed by Thomas Beauregard. A label at the bottom of the frame cannot be read, but presumably identifies the subject of the painting.
Date: unknown
Creator: Thomas Beauregard

[The Tour of Homes, 1976, (5)]

Description: The Cunningham House (502 NW 23rd Street, Mineral Wells, Texas) was built in the 1930's. It is in Italian Renaissance style, and it shows evidence of later remodeling. It later became the home of E.B. Ritchie, Palo Pinto County Judge from 1904 to 1908. Judge Ritchie was the first of four generations (son George M., grandson John P., great grandson Richard P.) of attorneys and civic Leaders in Palo Pinto County. This negative was part of a collection of photographs take by A. F. Weaver and was found in an envelope marked "Homes, Tour of, 4/76" The following names were listed: "McFall, Brewer, Catrett, John Moore, Hull, McLaughlin."
Date: unknown
Creator: A.F. Weaver

The Welcome Sign on East Mountain, Mineral Wells, Texas

Description: This picture is taken from a postcard claiming that the "Welcome" sign on East Mountain is "reputed to be the largest non-commercial electric sign in U.S." It has been claimed that the "Hollywood" sign was inspired by the "Welcome" sign, but this is likely a folk legend. (The preceding picture is a black and white original of this tinted picture. A more complete description may be found there.)
Date: unknown

[An Early Bird's-Eye-View of Mineral Wells]

Description: A very early panoramic view of Mineral Wells (taken around 1882) from East Mountain and looking southwest is illustrated here. Locations identified by numbers are: 1: Judge Lynch's cabin, now Lynch Plaza at S. Oak Avenue and E. Hubbard Street; 2: The Mesquite Street well, middle of NE 1st Avenue (the second well in town, now [2008] abandoned); 3:The current center of downtown Mineral Wells, showing the intersection of Oak Avenue (US 281) and Hubbard Street (US Highway 180); 4: The current Fire and Police Departments; 5: S. Oak Avenue; 6: The Southern House Hotel; 7: The present "Business District", NE 1st Avenue; and 8: N. Oak Avenue (a residential area at the time.)
Date: 1882?

[A Home at 401 N. W. 6th Street]

Description: This photograph is found on page 115 of the "Mini Edition, 'Time Was'..." and on page 140 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. J. S. Murphy (seen on the left) built this home in 1914 for L. E. Seaman (on the right). The style appears to be eclectic, with Prairie and Mission elements. Please note the unusual double porte-cochere and the shaped parapet of the front dormer.
Date: unknown

The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877

Description: This photograph illustrates a cartoon. "1880" is written in ink at bottom of the photograph, evidently in correction of the cartoon. Lynch arrived in what would later be Mineral Wells in 1877. His first well, dug to forty-one feet in 1878, was dry. The second well, drilled deeper, was in 1880. Please see also "Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells" and "Mr. Lynch on His Way to Discover Mineral Wells." The cartoon appears to have been taken by A. F. Weaver from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters" which is in the holdings of the Palo Pinto County Album (q.v.). The booklet was written in the nineteenth-century burlesque tradition, and Weaver makes no comment on the cartoon or the booklet.
Date: unknown

[The Period Hotel and Annex]

Description: The Period Hotel, located at N.W. 4th Avenue and 6th Street, was owned and managed by Miss Lizzie More. The hotel was destroyed by fire, but its annex is still [2007] standing, and is in use as an apartment house. A similar, but earlier, photograph is found on page 103 of A.F. Weaver's pictorial history "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells," Second Edition, 1988.
Date: unknown

[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 2 of 3: A Piggy Wiggly Is in the Background]

Description: The construction of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, at 101 SE 1st Avenue in 1975, was documented in this series of photographs. The Howard Building, the first of the complex of Howard Brothers Department Stores, had been built on this location in the early 1900's. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975, to make room for the Savings and Loan. The Piggly Wiggly Grocery Store (at the site of Mineral Wells' first Post Office) and the Green Stamp Store are visible across SE 1st Avenue, south of the Savings and Loan. The new First State State currently covers the entire city block at this location.
Date: 1975

[A Piano Recital, 5 of 10]

Description: This photograph, along with nine others, was taken from a roll of film labeled, "Ina Howard Ramsey." Thelma Doss, a local radio personality and historian, is pictured with the pianist in this photograph. The recital was given in the Fellowship Hall of the First Presbyterian church.
Date: 1975
Creator: A.F. Weaver

The Curtis House

Description: The Curtis House was once to be found at 315 E. Hubbard Street in Mineral Wells. This photograph of it is to be found on page 101 of "Time Was..." by A.F. Weaver. Note the steeple of Methodist Episcopal Church at 301 NE 1st Street, at the far right edge of the picture. Built in 1898, the church was expanded in 1903 as the First Methodist church, whose congregation still [2008] occupies this location in a newer church building.
Date: unknown

[The Penix Home ]

Description: The Penix Home (at 1001 SW 7th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas)was once owned by William H. Penix--partner of the law firm of Penix, Miller, Perkins, and Dean. He also served as vice-president of the Bank of Mineral Wells in 1920. The style is Queen Anne, Free Classic sub-type. It is shown here much-ravaged by time. Note the decayed "Gingerbread", the cut-away bay (not common in Mineral Wells),and the flat-topped tower, which is unlikely to have been original. The house was re-located in 1989 to an area north of town,now [2008] Bennett Road. Restoration of the house was completed in 1998.
Date: unknown

[Three Women at a Swimming Pool]

Description: Three women are shown at the "old" Mineral Wells City Pool. A male lifeguard, to their right, looks on unconcernedly. Only one woman can be identified: Jill Hickey, Mineral Wells High School graduate of 1966,the woman on the right, now Jill Hickey Moore of Stafford, Texas.
Date: April 29, 1967

[An Old Map of Mineral Wells]

Description: An early cadastral map of Mineral Wells with the original street names, it also shows the unusual topography of the surrounding mountains. The streets were paved in 1914, and the street names were changed January 1,1920.
Date: unknown