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Hotel Damron, Mineral Wells, Texas
This picture shows a post-card view of the Damron Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas. It was built in 1906 as The Colonial Hotel by rancher J.T. Holt for his second wife, because she would not live in the country. The hotel was traded around 1917 to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. The hotel burned completely in 1978.
[Leon Cross, Shoe Shine Boy in 1975]
Leon Cross was the only "shine boy" left in Mineral Wells in 1975. He worked in the first Crazy Hotel just before it burned; and has been with the Crazy Hotel ever since, working in different departments of the Hotel. He is the Shine Boy today [2003] in the Crazy Barber Shop, located in the Crazy Hotel. This photograph appears in A.F. Weaver's book "Time Was in Mineral Wells."
Looking south on Mesquite Street
A street scene, identified as Mesquite Street (now NE 1st Avenue)and looking south, taken at the turn of the twentieth century, shows businesses that antedate the coming of the automobile. On the right, in the middle of the picture, the Yeager Building is shown with a stone lion mounted on its roof. Many historians now refer to this building as the Lion Drug Store. However, current Yeager descendants now living in Mineral Wells do not remember the store as ever being named anything but The Yeager Drug Store. The third building on the left (with the spire on top) was the Star Well whose manager, Frank Richards was an active participant in Mineral Wells' early business and social activities. At the end of the street is Mineral Wells depot built in 1902. Absence of the "Dinky Car" tracks in the middle of the street indicates that the picture was taken prior to the building of the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway in 1905.
Lithia Wells
The Lithia Wells and Drinking Pavilion was located on the southwest corner of the "Crazy Block." (400 NW 1st Avenue, the current [2008]location of the Crazy Retirement Home). The second Crazy Well Pavilion is the large building the upper left of the photograph. Note the three burros next to the horse. Riding burros up a trail on East Mountain was a popular tourist pastime, in addition to drinking and bathing in the mineral waters. The Mineral Wells Public Library was located in the Lithia Pavilion at one time. See also the preceding picture.
Malsby Dairy Construction
The building of the Malsby Dairy.
[A Man and a Woman on Donkeys]
Shown here is a rocky, bosky hillside. A man and a woman are both on donkeys; he leans over with a hand on her donkey; five photographers, under veils, catch the scene with cameras. Note that the photographers all wear vests. The clothing of the woman suggests early 20th century. No more is known about this picture.
Welcome Sign & Lookout Tower: 1929
The WELCOME sign was donated to the city of Mineral Wells in 1922 by George Holmgren, President of the Texas Rotary Club, in appreciation for the hospitality extended the Rotary Club at its State Convention in Mineral Wells that year. The caption on the photograph reads: "Reputed to be the largest Non-commercial electric sign in U.S." East Mountain was a popular place for viewing the city, especially for photographers. The lookout tower atop West Mountain (above the WELCOME sign) was destroyed by a tornado in 1930. The Welcome Sign was built by Holmgren in his San Antonio Iron Works in 1922. He gave the sign to the people of Mineral Wells with the understanding that they would maintain the sign and the many light bulbs required to light it. The Mineral Wells Jaycees later replaced the light bulbs with lower-maintenance red neon lights. A Warrant Officer Club Company from Fort Wolters moved the sign from East Mountain in 1972 to the east side of Bald Mountain, where it remains today [2008], lighted with flood lights at its base. It is reported that this sign inspired D.W. Griffith, to promote possibly the most recognizable landmark in the United States, the HOLLYWOOD sign in California, following his visit to Mineral Wells in 1928. Griffith, Producer/Director of the early movie classic, "Birth of a Nation," also produced the "Keystone Kops" comedies. The house in the foreground (an example of Queen Anne architecture, spindle-work sub-type) was the home of druggist Dr. C.F. Yeager. Also in the picture, about half-way up the mountain, is the water tower supplying mineral water to the then new Baker Hotel. The object in the upper-left-hand corner of the picture invites speculation.
[Mineral Wells' Municipal Airport]
An aerial View of Mineral Wells Municipal Airport and Downing (named after Colonel Wayne Downing, who was killed in a stateside accident) Heliport is shown here. In 1946, the City of Mineral Wells obtained use of the airport, although the Department of Defense retained an "Emergency-use" provision until 1966--after which year it was not renewed. In April 1966, the Department of Defense leased 970 acres from the City of Mineral Wells to build a heliport ("To improve helicopter training", it was stated) that was due to be completed by September of that year. The Fort Wolters "Trumpet" reported the progress of the construction of the heliport in detail in its subsequent numbers.
[D. W. Griffith]
D. W. Griffith is shown standing on the roof of the new Crazy Hotel, which opened in 1927; and replaced the First Crazy Hotel, which had burned in 1925. Mr. Griffith, who produced silent movies including the "Keystone Kops" comedies, and the classic film "Birth of a Nation", was a guest at the Crazy Hotel while visiting Mineral Wells in 1929. A commemorative postage stamp was issued in his honor on May 27, 1975. Local folklore has it that Mr. Griffith was impressed by the "WELCOME" sign on East Mountain (the world's largest non-commercial, electrically-lighted sign at the time). He developed the "HOLLYWOOD HILLS" addition with other partners when he returned to California, and he erected what is probably the most recognizable landmark in America: The HOLLYWOOD sign now graces Los Angeles. Both signs have survived similar difficult times in their histories. This picture appears on page 19 of A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", second edition, 1974.
[Two Old-Time Stores]
This picture appears to show two stores that stand cheek-by-jowl. A saddlery on the far left shares space with a furniture storethat also sold cofins. The sign over the stores combines their functions in a way that would--under other circumstances--seem comical. The building itself was located at the corner of SE 1st, and South Oak Streets. A note on the photograph states that it was south of the MARTIN BUILDING. It was once the McBrayer-Armstrong Grocery, then later the Nash Hardware store. The location of Lattner eventually became the Buy-Rite store [116 South Oak Avenue, at the corner of SE 1st Street, until some time in the early 1980's]. The road is unpaved, there is no evidence of lighting--except for the lamp mounted on a post at the front of the building. The horse-drawn hearse (without its horse or plumes) suggests that although it was in front of the stores, it was not at the time in use. The picture, therefore, dates from the end of the 19th century--or the earliest 20th century.
[Unloading Grain From Box Cars]
This picture depicts men unloading grain from box cars at the Mineral Wells railroad yards into horse-drawn wagons. During the days if the Great Depression years of the 1930's, grain and cotton were the principal cash crops of farmers around Mineral Wells, and the WMW&NW (Weatherford, Mineral Wells and Northwest) Railroad was a prime shipper of the crops to market. This photograph is featured on page 92 of A.F. Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells," second edition.
[The Thompson House, at 215 NE 2nd Street]
Shown here is a photograph of the front of the Thompson House (later the "Cunningham House"), a two-story, Queen Anne-style home located at 215 NE 2nd Street in Mineral Wells, Texas, just north of the Baker Hotel. Architectural elements include decorative woodwork around the eaves in the gable ends and across the front porch, and cutaway bays on the left of the photograph. A cupola serves in place of the tower that is characteristic of Queen Anne styles.
Vichy Well Natatorium
An off-season (Winter?) picture of the Vichy Well Natatorium, once located in the 600 block of North Oak Avenue, where North Oak Community Center now [2008] stands is illustrated here. The picture is dated the time around 1900. The Vichy well featured a swimming pool, which it labelled a "Natatorium." Later improvements, when the name was changed to The Standard Well, included a motion-picture theater and a pavilion for dancing. (Note the Dr. A.W. Thompson residence and the Mineral Wells Sanitarium on the right skyline.) A USO was built on this location In World War II for white servicemen at Camp Wolters. The USO building was turned over to the city at the end of the war, and became known as the North Oak Community Center. Preservation efforts are underway [in 2008] to restore the Community Center.
[A Tamale Vendor on Oak and Hubbard]
Fred Estrada "The Mineral Wells Hot Tamale Man" sold "The Best Tamales Anywhere", at 75 cents a dozen, at the corner of Hubbard Street and Oak Avenue for many years. Automobiles, dating from the early-to-mid-twentieth century, and a U.S. Mailbox, may also be seen in the picture. The picture occurs on page 182 of "TIME WAS...", second edition.
[A String and Drum Band]
This picture shows 18 people, 2 of whom appear to be adults. Visible are a snare drum, bass drum, cymbals, triangle, violins, lutes, bass viol and viola--and an anvil. The background appears to be painted. Further information about this band might have been presently [2012 ]lacking.
[The Una McLaughlin Home]
The "Una McLaughlin" home is located on NW 23rd Street. This photograph was taken in July, 1975. Built in 1927 by J.C. Cunningham, an oil operator, the home was sold in 1931 to Judge E.B. Ritchie. It was purchased in 1973 by Una McLaughlin. It has since changed hands several times. It is presently [2014] vacant. The tile in the living room fireplace is the same as used in the Baker Hotel. The tile, stained glass in the breakfast room, and the light fixtures are in the Art Deco style. The architectural style of the house is Italian Renaissance. It shows signs of being remodeled.
[Will Rogers at the Baker Hotel]
No Description Available.
[The Woodmen of the World Convention at the Chautauqua]
The caption of this picture, shown on page 50 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver, states: "Part of the Woodmen of the World convention men gathered in front of the Chautauqua [building] for this picture in 1911. Many thousand attended." Note the men perched in two of the trees to the right (and left) of the observer, and also those sitting on top of the sign at the left of the picture. The building itself was demolished, probably during the following year, 1912.
[Women in a Truck]
An unknown group of six women is shown posing on a truck. The type of truck is also not known. There are two photographs of this group of women with not a clue concerning who they might have been. The Bimini Bath House (and a horse-drawn wagon) are in the background. See also, the photograph "Five Women on Bridge."
[W. W. Howard's Hardware Store]
The Howard Hardware store was once located at 101 E. Hubbard Street. The hanging electric lights, the tea table to the left, the double row of "air-tight" stoves ranks down the center aisle all strongly suggest that the photograph was taken in the early twentieth century. The dimness of the photograph makes discerning further items on sale difficult. Persons identified in picture are: Helen Howard, Flora Howard, A. L. Howard and one unidentified person.
[The Arlington Hotel]
The Arlington Hotel--the largest hotel in Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas--with its famous thermal baths, is shown here. It is under the regulation of the United States Government. There is a beautiful "Cascade" swimming pool for guests. This picture is taken from a POST CARD titled "Plastichrome [Registered] by COLOUR PICTURES, INC. Boston, 10, Massachusetts U.S.A." The builder of the Baker Hotel spent time here, and he was so impressed with the hotel that he modeled the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells upon this one.
[A Baseball Team]
This picture shows a men's baseball team in Mineral Wells, but the identification of both the team and the men are unknown. Ike Zablosky (sometimes spelled Zabronski), a Russian immigrant, arrived in America in 1906. He entered the fur-trading business in Mineral Wells, and is credited with naming the Possum Kingdom area when a customer inquired about some premium pelts. Zablosky replied that he had none at the time, but "When my boys return from the possum kingdom, I'm sure they will have some." Zablosky operated a class C professional league baseball team (the Resorters)in Mineral Wells. He became owner of the first professional baseball team in Dallas, later in life. The Chicago White Sox are known to have held their Spring Training camp in Mineral Wells in 1911, and again during a three-year stretch of 1916, 1917, and 1918. It has not been established whether the players shown in this picture represent the Resorters or the White Sox teams. The man in the background, apparently in a World War I uniform, is shown holding an instrument (probably a bugle) whose function has not been determined.
Jack Amlung
The band in this photograph is identified as "Jack Amlung." It consists of nine players, including its leader. The instruments visible are: A sousaphone; two (?)pianos; a violin; an alto saxophone; a clarinet, a guitar, a bass viol; percussion.
Pasadena Heights
A July, 1906 plat of "Pasadena Heights, the Home Builders Addition to Mineral Wells, Texas"is illustrated here. Developers of the addition were D. M. Howard, (Co-owner of Mineral Wells' first big department store, Howard Brothers), B. R. Strong, and Frank Richards (manager of the Star Well and owner of an early mineral water crystal plant). Street names were changed in 1912. This area came to be facetiously called "Jackass Flats" by locals. The Brazos Mall is currently [2008] located at the bottom of the plat, Wal-Mart, to the east of the plat. Elmwood Cemetery is at the southwest edge of the plat.
The Bimini
The Bimini Mineral Baths, at 112 NW 4th Street, was built by Goodrum, Murphy and Croft, contractors in the early 1900's. The Bimini later became the Wagley Bathhouse. Dr. Wagley was an early pharmacist in Mineral Wells. The El Paso Morning Times in 1909 states that the re-building of the Bimini (the building here illustrated) will cost "...over $35,000." What the equivalent amount could be in modern-das dollars remains unknown. Please note the utter lack of automobiles, and the horse-drawn vehicle in front of the bath house. The meaning of the white-ink number "1861" remains to be determined.
[North Oak Avenue ]
A street scene in Mineral Wells (looking north on Oak Avenue) approximately at the corner of North Oak Avenue and West Hubbard Street is shown here. Street car (running from 1907 to 1913) tracks are visible in the foreground, and the guy wires required to keep the power wire of the trolley in place festoon the sky. The Hexagon Hotel (opened in 1897)is visible towards the back of the picture. The Vichy (later the Beach, and then later still, the Standard) well is barely visible across from the Hexagon Hotel. The streets of Mineral Wells were not paved until 1914. Please observe the utter absence of automobiles.
Crazy Well, Mineral Wells, Texas
This is a picture of the first Crazy Well drinking pavilion, the first such facility in the city. When a Mr. Wiggins dug the third well in town, it was frequented by a "crazy woman" who was eventually cured of her dementia. Because of the word-of-mouth publicity, people came from miles around to drink the health-giving water. A house was built around the well for the convenience of the customers. The highly successful business attracted competition, and one of the most popular health spas in the nation grew from these beginnings.
Exchange Hotel
[The] Exchange Hotel (also known as [The]Plateau in 1909, and later as the Hospital) was built on the site of the Cliff House, which was destroyed by fire. The house to the right was built in 1896 by Dr. A. W. Thompson as a wedding present for his second wife. The Mineral Wells Post Office was built on the vacant lot at the left of the hotel in 1912. The Hotel presents something of a conundrum. An annotation without date states that the Exchange Hotel was destroyed by fire and the Plateau Hotel was built in its place. A notation of 1902 states that the Plateau Hotel was the only brick hotel. A 1907 map shows the Hotel as being at 207 East Coke (Now NE 2nd Avenue) Street. In 1909, a St. Paul Sanitarium was listed at 118 NE 7th Street. .A map of 1912 shows the Plateau Hotel as still being in existence. The city directory of 1920 shows no building in the 200 block--except for the Post Office. A Mineral Wells City Directory of 1924 listed the former Exchange/Plateau building as the Mineral Wells Sanatorium. Dr. A.W. Thompson was still living in the house to the right at the time. In 1924, the Mineral Wells Sanitarium was listed as being at 211 NE 2nd Street, and a Hotel Wilson (with no room for a third building) at 211 NE 2nd Street. In 1928, the Mineral Wells Sanitarium was listed at 211 NE 2nd Street. By 1937, there was no listing in the City Directory. It is presumed that the Hotel/Hospital was finally demolished.
[Mesquite Street]
A picture of Mesquite Street (in 2008: NE 1st Avenue) looking south is illustrated in this picture. The drug store in the picture is the C. F. Yeager Drugstore on the SE corner of Mesquite Street and NE 1st Street. A bank is also visible at the next corner up from the Yeager Drug which is the SE corner of Mesquite and Hubbard Streets. There are people in the middle of the Street, and several horse drawn vehicles, indicating a parade or demonstration of some sort. Since most of the crowd are ladies in period dress at about the turn of the twentieth century, it could be a demonstration for Womens' Suffrage or the Ladies Temperance League demonstrating in favor of prohibition--no signs or placards are apparent.
Mosquito Street, Looking North, Mineral Wells, Texas
Shown here is a postcard, reading "Mosquito Street [actually Mesquite Street], Looking North, Mineral Wells, Texas." Please note the Chautauqua Theater (1905-1912) at the end of the street. This picture was taken before street car tracks were installed in 1907. Also note the the absence of cars on the street--only horses and buggies.
[Mesquite Street, Looking South]
Shown here is a view of Mesquite Street (Now [2008] NE First Avenue) from its upper end at Coke Street (now NE 2nd Street). Horse-drawn vehicles are present. The building at the left middle of the picture with the "DRUGS" sign and the stone lion statue on its roof is the Yeager Building, home of what was popularly called "The Lion Drug Store." The first building on right, 205 NE First Street (with arched windows) was H. M. Coleman's clothing store for men, which even at this early date, appears to be undergoing renovation.
[Hacks at a Railroad Depot]
Before the ascendancy of automobiles to public popularity, hacks met newcomers at the depot to take them to their favorite hotel or rooming house. This picture is probably typical week-end visitors from the Ft. Worth/Dallas "Metroplex" in Mineral Wells to drink the health-giving mineral water, and take the relaxing baths and massages. The men on the telephone poles were typical of the "spotters" who sought to deliver clients to local hotels and rooming houses. The photograph appears on page 44 of the "Time Was..." Second Edition.
[Mineral Wells Firemen , about 1907]
An undated, hand-written note, in what appears to be Mr. Weaver's writing, and attached to the print says that it is "Sam Smith's Picture." In another person's handwriting, a second note states, "MW [Mineral Wells] firemen at McLendon and Burch Feed Store--where Brookshire Furniture store now is (213 SE 1st Street). Burned out between 1907 and 1915. Front Row: Guy Croft, Henry Russell, J W (Buck) Thomas, Jube Warren, Holland Cogdell, Bill Deck (mask on), Bob Bozzell, Oscar Bish -Chief- , John Moore. Top Row - John Gill, Ben McGowen, D.E. Odell, Henry Briley, Arthur Ford, Arthur Howard, C.H. Alexander, Henry Hester, J.W. Birdwell, Ernest Wallace, Reginald Cogdell (driver). 18 are known to be deceased." Then, in Mr. Weaver's handwriting again, "All but three deceased." There is another note subtracting 1907 from 1973, with 66 as the result. The photograph possibly dates from 1907, and Mr. Weaver's notes to 1973.
Texas Carlsbad Well [3 of 3: People on Porch]
The Texas Carlsbad Well, located at 415 NW 1st Avenue, was one of the early mineral water wells in Mineral Wells. It was located directly across the street, and west of the first Crazy Water Well drinking pavilion. The Carlsbad slogan was: "Makes a man love HIS wife, Makes a wife love HER husband, Robs the divorce court of its business, Takes the temper out of red-headed people, Puts ginger into ginks and pepper into plodders." The Carlsbad Pavilion is prominent in several pictures taken in 1908, but this structure was demolished and replaced with a brick structure in 1911. This picture is slightly cropped but it is slightly sharper in certain areas than the previous two pictures.
[A Parade in 1925]
A military contingent of the 1925 West Texas Chamber of Commerce Parade in Mineral Wells is shown here. The parade is proceeding west in the 100 block of NE 2nd Street. Please note the Mineral Wells Sanatorium in the upper right of the photograph just east of the old Post Office. Please note also the double line of angle-parked automobiles on the street.
Gibson Well, Mineral Wells, Texas
Shown here is an early picture of the Gibson Well drinking pavilion, located in the 700 block of NW 2nd Avenue. Note the horse and buggy. Note also the condition of the (unpaved) street. Finally, please note the "Dinky Car" track in the lower right corner of the picture. The gasoline-powered motor cars traveled at fifteen-minute intervals between the city and Lake Pinto from 1905 to 1909. The tracks remained in place some years after. The Gibson Well pavilion was expanded and a park was added on its west. The Christian Church (built of limestone rocks from the historic cattle pens on Dillingham Prairie) now occupies the entire city block on which the Gibson Well was formerly located.
Texas Carlsbad Well
The Texas Carlsbad Well, 415 N.W. 1st Avenue is illustrated, this picture taken about around 1908. This first Carlsbad pavilion was directly across N.W. 1st Avenue, west of the second Crazy well pavilion. The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway ran down N.W. 1st Avenue between the two pavilions from 1905 to 1909 providing service each 1/4 hour to Lake Pinto. The "Ben Hur" gasoline-powered motor cars were the last and largest of the "Dinky Cars" in service on the tracks that are visible in this picture. This picture can be found on page 82 of A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS ... ", first edition. A second pavilion, a modern brick structure, was added in 1909 and the original wooden building was later removed. The second pavilion was taken over by the Crazy Hotel for its Laundry and Dry Cleaning during World War II.
Lower End of Mesquite St.
A view of Mesquite Street (in 2008: NE 1st Avenue), taken in 1910, and looking south-east. The scene shows horse-drawn wagons loaded with cotton bales. Electrical lines are visible. The building at the northeast corner of East Hubbard Street and South Mesquite Street is the D.M. Howard Block. D. M Howard was the first of five Howard brothers to come to Mineral Wells and establish businesses. There was a Dry Goods store on the left end of the building, a millinery shop above it, and a grocery store was in the building to the right. Later the J.M. Belcher Furniture occupied the building; and still later, R&W Furniture. Demolition of the building began March 17 of 1975 to make room for the Savings and Loan Building and a parking lot. The First State Bank now [2007] occupies this entire block.
[The Lions Club Womanless Wedding]
Pictured here is the Lion's Club "Woman-less Wedding", a Community Entertainment Production sponsored by the local Lion's Club as a fund-raiser for local charity, and popular around the 1930's and 1940's. Participants are identified as: Seated; J. B. Courtney (Miss Fortune), Charles Williams and Noble Glenn (Miss Applied). Standing; Cary Lodal, Dr. Holder, Bob Joiner, Jess Purvine, Cecil Young, Charlie Johnson and Frank Burney (Mae West).
[The Clark Residence on N W 4th Ave.]
The W. V. Clark residence on NW 4th Avenue (which was originally called Pecan Street). This photograph was taken in June of 1974. A photograph on page 139 of "TIME WAS..." by A. F. Weaver shows the house to better advantage before foliage of the trees obscured part of it. It is presently [2016] in sad condition, and in need of remodeling.
[Bank of Mineral Wells]
This picture shows the interior of the Bank of Mineral Wells. Collie Smith, L.E. Hamen, and someone named only "O'Neal" are shown in the cages. Please note the cuspidors and the potted plants. The bank went out of business in 1924. The building was then used by Ball Drugs, and then by Massengale's Appliances. The building was eventually torn down, to make room for a parking in the downtown area. It is featured in "Time was in Mineral Wells" on page 148.
[Arthur Howard]
We have here a photograph of Arthur Howard, it was taken about 1898. The cap he is wearing identifies him as "ASST CHIEF." (He is believed to have been assistant fire chief of Mineral Wells at that time.) He was City Secretary and Tax Assessor and Collector for the City of Mineral Wells in 1907. He was re-elected to office in April of that year by a majority vote. He is said to have organized his department (as Tax Assessor) thoroughly and he was much respected for doing it.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 19 of 21, Two People Looking South from North]
The Damron Hotel was built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 during the heyday of Mineral Wells as a popular resort city. It burned completely on December 22, 1975. This picture shows the front entrance under a dark plume of black smoke, with flames breaking through the upper floors of the front wall. Two people (one with a hard hat, and one without)stand observing the proceedings.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 15 of 21: Passenger Cars on a Back Street]
The Damron Hotel, built in 1906 during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort spa, burned completely on December 22, 1975. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard Street. This picture shows the dense cloud of smoke that resulted from the holiday catastrophe. Westbound traffic on .S. Highway 180 had to be re-routed in order to avoid the clutter of debris that littered the street.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 7 of 21: The Parking Lot Behind the Hotel]
This is another view of the spectacular fire that consumed the Damron Hotel during the 1975 Christmas Season. The Damron was originally built as the Colonial Hotel in 1906 by rancher J.T. Holt for his second wife. The name was changed in 1917 when the hotel was traded to Agnew and Bessie Damron in exchange for a ranch. The fire was covered extensively by free-lance photographers. The hotel was formerly located on at 109 W. Hubbard Street, on the corner of the block that included SW 1st Avenue and SW 1st Street. Spot fires began on many nearby buildings, but they were extinguished quickly by volunteers atop those same buildings. This picture was taken during the later stages of the fire, and shows the gutted rear of the hotel, with huge flames still burning in the front portion of the building.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 13 of 21: Christmas Decorations on Light Poles]
The Damron Hotel (which was built in 1906 during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort city) burned completely on December 22, 1975. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard Street. By 11:30 (some two hours after the fire started), the Davidson Hardware company, next door, was engulfed in flames. George's Man's Shop and Hill's style Shop were also damaged.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 5 of 21: View from the Rear of the Building]
The Damron Hotel was built in 1906 as the Colonial Hotel by J. T. Holt. At one time, both Kiwanis and the Rotary service Clubs met in the dining room that was located on the west side of the main floor. Formerly located at 109 W. Hubbard Street, the hotel burned completely on December 22, 1975 in a spectacular fire that was extensively photographed. Shown here is one of many views of the fire.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 10 of 21]
Another in the extensive series of photographs that covered the spectacular holiday fire that completely consumed the Damron Hotel during the 1975 Christmas season. This picture shows some of the early response to the fire. Note, for example, the electrical utility truck, which has arrived to cut off electrical power to the buildings. The Damron Hotel (which was built during the days when Mineral Wells was a resort) was originally named the Colonial Hotel. It was located at 109 W. Hubbard. The spectacular fire received extensive photographic coverage. The sign "Pemberton Appliance and Plumbing", located across the street west, is visible. Pemberton's also suffered damage in the fire, but by 7:30 the next day, workmen were installing plate glass in it.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 14 of 21: Drifting Smoke From the Fire]
The Damron Hotel, which was built during the days that Mineral Wells was a popular resort city, burned completely on December 22, 1975. It was located 109 W. Hubbard Street. This photograph was taken from about a block away from the scene, and shows the dense cloud of smoke that resulted from the fire. The hotel was built in 1906 by rancher J. T. Holt for his second wife because she insisted that she would not live in the country. Originally named the Colonial Hotel, the name was changed in 1917 when Mr. Holt traded it to Agnew and Bessie Damron for a ranch. In its heyday, both the Kiwanis and the Rotary Service Clubs once met in its dining room.
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 12 of 21: Numerous Fire Hoses Lying in Front of the Hotel]
Another view of the front entrance to the Damron Hotel at 109 W. Hubbard during the earlier stages of the fire that completely destroyed it on December 22, 1975. Debris from the burning hotel wafted as far as seven blocks from the burning building. No major injuries were reported. The spectacular Holiday fire that destroyed the hotel received extensive photographic coverage.