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ABOUT BROWSE FEED
First State Bank & Trust Company
The First State Bank and Trust Company and the Oxford Hotel were located at the corner of Oak and Hubbard Streets. The building burned in 1983. It is now the site of the Lynch Building and Plaza, the site of the first discovered mineral water well in Mineral Wells.
[Mineral Wells High School's First Graduating Class, 1903]
Shown in this picture are, from left to right: Maggie McDaniel, Annabel Cushman, Myra Hunt Oliver and (Valedictorian) Ferdinand "Doc" Howard. The title of his valedictory address was "The Electrical Age." The diplomas were presented by Judge F.C. Highsmith. This photograph is to be found in the second edition of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver on page 189.
Laying the Cornerstone of the Post Office
Shown here is the laying the cornerstone of the Post Office at 201 NE 2nd Street on May 13, 1912. The Chautauqua is at the upper left corner of the picture, and the Cliff House Hotel is visible in the upper middle of the picture. Buildings on the right side of the picture were situated on the east side of Mesquite Street (now NE 1st Avenue). Buildings on the far right of the picture were once located where the Baker Hotel now [2008] stands. Early automobiles and horse-drawn carriages also appear in the picture. The photographer appears to have been standing on the north side of NE 2nd Street, looking east. A holograph inscription above and below the picture cannot be read.
[People Sitting in a car]
This photograph, looking west on East Hubbard at the corner of NE lst Avenue, shows a touring car, with two men in front and three women behind. Please note the trolley car tracks in front of the car. They are almost covered with dirt and no longer in use. This photograph, taken about 1915, may be found on page 137 of Art Weaver's book "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells."
[The Crazy Theatre--With a Car]
This photograph may be found in A. F. Weaver's Book, "Time Was...", 2nd edition, on page 17. It is captioned "Crazy Theater, 400 North Oak Avenue, photo around 1918."
[A Gazebo in West Park]
A gazebo, built during the 1970-1980's era, is visible through the trees in West City Park. The park is located on US highway 180 (Hubbard Street) where Pollard Creek crosses it--west of downtown Mineral Wells, Texas.
[The Crazy Water Crystal Factory]
Shown here is an interior view of the Crazy Crystals Plant. "Crazy Water" was evaporated, and the dissolved solids precipitated as crystals which were then packaged and shipped all over the United States, Canada, England and Australia. By dissolving the Crazy Water crystals in water, the purchaser was able to reconstitute "mineral water" and secure the benefits of one of the earliest "instant" beverages without the added cost of the supplying company's shipping water.
[The Crazy Bottling Plant]
The Crazy Water Bottling Plant and Crazy Water Tower are shown here. The plant was built in 1919 at a cost of $85,000, and is located at 300 NW 7th Street. The location was once the original site of the Sangcura-Sprudel Wells Pavilion. The Sangcura-Sprudel Pavilion was moved and converted into a rooming house, which burned in 1973. Notice the home in the background. The date on back of photograph is given as 1940.
[The First Crazy Hotel]
This picture shows the front of the first Crazy Hotel, which was destroyed by fire March 15, 1925. Built in two stages and joined together, the first (back) section was built in 1912, and the second (front) section was completed in 1914. A handwritten note on back of photograph states, "Crazy Hotel 1913. Front of Hotel Facing South Mineral Wells, Tx." This picture is included on page 15 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS...", and was probably taken before the second section of the hotel opened for business. The back of Crazy Flats (the second Crazy Water Drinking Pavilion) can be seen to the right, north of and behind the hotel in this picture.
[A Train Depot]
George and Daurice O'Neil purchased the depot,and their son Don helped with the restoration. It is now [2008] used as office rental. Elliot & Waldron Title Company and Gault, Attorney-at-Law, are leasing space there. The building is listed on the National registry in Washington [D.C.] and it sports a Texas Historical Marker. It is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 190.
D. M. Howard Merchant
A view of the D.M. Howard store is shown here. It was located at 101 SE First Avenue. D.M. Howard was one of five brothers to come to Mineral Wells from North Carolina. D.M. Howard died on January 23 (a Saturday), 1910 at his home, following an operation for appendicitis. This building was occupied by J. M. Belcher (a furniture dealer)for many years after it had ceased to be the D.M. Howard store, and then by the R.& W Furniture store. It was eventually torn down in 1975 to make room for the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan--and for parking. This picture is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 122.
[A Man, A Woman and a Portrait]
Ruby Shattles (Mrs. Jesse Shattles) presents a portrait of Achilles Corcanges to Mr. Corcanges, founder & owner of radio station KORC in Mineral Wells. Mrs. Shattles owned and operated Pavilion Studios at 412 North Oak. This picture may be found in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 185.
[Thelma Doss Interviews Claude Gardner]
Thelma Doss interviews the writer Claude Garner on KORC Radio. Looking on are (left) W. Lions; (center) Corcanges [founder & owner of the station]; (right)Orval Shore. KORC radio broadcast first on December 5, 1946. Its name was changed to KJSA-AM in 1973. This picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 185.
[Palo Pinto General Hospital]
Palo Pinto General Hospital opened in 1970 and is located west of Mineral Wells. It has been, since this picture was taken, enlarged and remodeled extensively. This hospital replaced the downtown Nazareth Hospital. While the hospital was been built, the first two floors of the Crazy Water Hotel was used as a hospital. This picture is featured in "Time Once Was in Mineral Wells" on page 168.
[A Period Car]
Three men are shown sitting in a restored "Vintage" car. Razz Ford sits in the back seat. Tom Creighton, in the driver's seat, still wears the beard he grew for Palo Pinto County's 1957 Centennial celebration. Russell Whatley occupies the passenger's seat. The car is making an exit from the driveway of the Baker Hotel onto Hubbard Street. The picture was taken in 1958. The building behind the Oldsmobile/Cadillac sign is the Beetham Funeral Home.
A Map of the City of Mineral Wells
A plat of the city of Mineral Wells, prior to 1920. The names of the streets were changed after 1920.
[Mrs. Yokley Entertained the "Aid"]
A group of people sit and stand on the elaborately-decorated porch of a house. Written on the back are the following notes: Mrs. Yokley entertaining the "Aid." Standing - Mrs. Mollie Yokley, Mrs. John Beetham, Mrs. M. E. Paren (mother of Mrs. Bock), Mrs. M. Raines (mother of Mrs. McCracken), Mrs. Lock (a neighbor), Mrs. Veal and Nila, Mrs. J. H. McCracken. Sitting - Mrs. Provine, Mrs. Schneider, Mrs. Galbraith and Ann Lock, Mrs. Charles Harris, Mrs. G Montcastle, Mrs. W. L. Kearnes, Mrs. R. E. Bock, Mrs. Rosa Stevenson (a Dear Friend), Miss Lula Giraud (teacher and friend). Children - Bobby Provine, Edna Bock (on Pastor's lap), Drua Yokley and John C. Provine. J. W. McCall, Pastor.
[The Hexagon Hotel Staircase]
The Hexagon Hotel had four staircases that spiraled down through its five floors. The interior trim was of "heart of pine"--a hardwood, despite its name. Pegs and square nails were used in the construction. The building was designed in a honeycomb pattern to maximize ventilation for the comfort of the guests. See also: Hexagon Hotel [with history] for further details.
[A Street Scene From the Early 20th Century]
A picture of North Oak Street, taken in the early 20th century is shown here. Cars are present on the street,(note the curb) which was paved in 1914. An electrical power line, in the left middle of the photograph, burned March 15, 1925. The Hexagon Hotel may be seen obscurely at the edge of the business district at the lower far right of the photograph.
[A Women's Basketball Game at Elmhurst Park]
Games at Elmhurst Park in 1910 included women's basketball. The players here are wearing the typical basketball uniforms of "genteel ladies" of the day. Girls and ladies played on half of a normal basketball court with both teams shooting at the same basket. The game was restarted with a "jump ball" after each goal or foul (read: "Rule infraction").
[The Yeager Building]
Shown here is a stone building named "Yeager Block" on NE 1st Avenue. The building originally housed what was called, (by some) "The Lion Drug Store", and once had a metal statue of a lion on its roof. It housed the Baker Medical Supply Company at the time of the photograph. A retail store in the left (south) of the photograph was named "The Rural Route." A handwritten date on the back is given as 1993. The coffee shop H2JO was located on the north part of the building in 2006. Mike Chamberlain Photography was located on the north end of the block in 2006. It is now [2008] closed.
[The Lookout Tower of the Casino at Elmhurst Park]
This photograph appears on page 87 of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver. He writes, "The Casino had two lookout towers. Note the five persons in the tower." The people are not identified. The photograph appears to have been retouched for sharpness and contrast.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 18: Awards for Best Mess Halls, Most Reenlistments, and Best Drivers
This volume includes photographs of personnel being honored for Best Mess Halls, Most Re-enlistments, and Best Drivers.
[Men With Bricks]
Thirty-one men in shirtsleeves, some with straw hats, some in fedoras, all in white shirts, most with ties, each proudly hold up a three-holed brick in front of an undistinguished-looking building that is flanked by a live-oak tree. A van with an obscure legend (perhaps a laundry)stands behind them. The occasion that prompted this photograph remains obscure.
[The W.O.W. (Woodmen on the World) Drill Team]
This picture shows the Woodmen of the World Drill Team, taken on June 19, 1947. A caption on the back of the photograph reads: WOW DRILL TEAM 6-19-47---- Herman Tolbert, Capt.--LEFT TO RIGHT: Front row: Walter Carter, Gene Lee, Jimmy Brandenburg, Charlie Davis, Bill Teichman, Idys Cox, Jr., Boyce Harvey, Billy Brooks. Back Row: Melton Brewton, Walter Moore, Hayden Hughes, Bazil Brewton, Unknown [heavily underlined, with small lacuna, also underlined, following] Roy Alderson, Roy Brewton and Eldred Fryer. A further caption, rotated 90 degrees to the first reads: "Picture taken in Convention Hall." On the front of the photograph is handwritten: "phillips [sic] photog-aphic [sic] Service Abilene, Texas" in white ink. The photograph appears in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells" on page 165.
[A Ladies' Athletic Team]
Nine ladies in uniform (?), with kerchiefs on their heads, are shown seated on a rug in front of what is presumed to be a painted background. The basketball in front of the center-most lady is marked "'14". They are, perhaps a ladies' basketball team. Further information concerning them is lacking.
Souvenir Views of Mineral Wells, Texas
Shown here is a bottle-shaped souvenir of Mineral Wells. It consists of fourteen folios, showing various views of the attractions found in Mineral Wells. The clothing of the people photographed suggests a date of the early twentieth century.
[The First National Bank]
The First National Bank was organized about 1900 by Cicero Smith. It was located on the corner of Mesquite & Throckmorton Streets (Now, [2013] Southeast 1st Avenue and Northeast 1st Streets). The Index Printing Company is visible in the rear of the building. Fourteen men (and no women) are shown around the building, all dressed in three-piece suits--including the two lounging on the steps of the Index. The picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 146.
Crazy Crystals in Parade 1936
This photograph shows two vehicles in the Crazy Crystals Parade in 1936. One of the vehicles (a van) is decorated with Crazy Crystals Shipping Boxes. It is covered with streamers on the hood, door handle, the running board, and all the tires--including its spare. The car following it is black with white panels in the doors. It also has streamers on the hood. Apart from the printed legend on the base of the photograph, there is no further information available about this photograph.
[Fishing at Lake Mineral Wells]
Fishermen stand below a cataract of the spillway of Lake Mineral Wells. The photograph was taken in 1938. On the reverse of the picture is the and-written legend: Picture taken by A. F. Weaver. This picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells...." on page 112.
MINERAL WELLS TEXAS CARLSBAD WATER
This picture appears to be a label taken from a container of mineral water sold by the Texas Carlsbad Water Company. The label describes the water as "Purgative" and "Diuretic." DIRECTIONS state further: The average person requires from 8 to 12 glasses per day, but there are those who need less, and others for whom this quantity will not suffice. Hence drink such quantity as gives desired effect, be it small or great. One or two glasses taken hot, half hour before breakfast, will be found very effective. The label ends with the legend: This Label Censored [sic] by the Parker-Palo Pinto Co. Medical Society.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 19: Foreign Students
This volume features photographs of foreign military students attending the U.S. Army Primary Helicopter Training School. Students came from Australia, United Kingdom, Burma, Chile, France, Germany, Guatemala, Indonesia, Iran, Italy, Laos, Malaysia, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Turkey, and Vietnam.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 20: 697th Engineer Company, U.S. Army Reserve Units, 355th Engineer Battalion, 931st Engineer Group, 362nd Civil Affairs Units
This volume features the following: The 697th Engineer Company, U.S. Army Reserve Units, the 355th Engineer Battalion, the 931st Engineer Group and the 362nd Civil Affairs Units.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 16: Historic
This volume includes photographs of local citizens, pictures of the Possum Kingdom dam, and a record of a visit to the Fort from [then] Senator Lyndon B. Johnson.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 22: Enlisted Photos
This volume contains photographs of enlisted personnel. It features ceremonies, promotions, and awards.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 21: Visitors
This volume includes photographs of visitors to Fort Wolters. Images include Dwight D. Eisenhower, Lyndon B. Johnson, several generals, and assorted dignitaries.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 23: Miscellaneous
This volume includes photographs of ceremonies, cake cuttings, recreational events, holidays, and other activities.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 15: U.S. Army Hospital, Army Nurses, Beach Army Hospital, American Red Cross, Grey Ladies, Red Cross Volunteers, Dental Clinic
This volume includes photographs of the U.S. Army Hospital, Army Nurses, the Beach Army Hospital, the American Red Cross, the Grey Ladies, Red Cross Volunteers, and the Dental Clinic.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 17: Aircraft Airports
This volume includes photographs of the Mineral Wells Municipal Airport, maps, illustrations of aircraft, and articles on the Whirlybird, the Bell H-13 Helicopter, the OH-23 Raven the H-23D, the TH-55A Osage and the Hover Simulator.
[Poston's Dry Goods, 8 of 15: Royal Society Display Case]
The Royal Society embroidery and tatting thread display case with its owner, Will Poston standing next to it, is shown in the photograph. Poston Dry Goods stood at 107 N. Oak Avenue, in Mineral Wells, Texas.
[Crazy Water Company Railroad Cars]
Men are shown here loading boxes of Crazy Crystals onto railroad boxcars. Crazy Water Crystals were shipped nationwide in response to demand created by radio advertising. This scene is typical of the activity required to load boxcars to meet the demand for "instant Mineral Water." Printed on back of the photograph is: "Loading Crazy Crystals 1930."
[Crazy Crystals]
Men and women are shown here packaging Crazy Water Crystals. Mineral water was evaporated, and the resulting crystal deposits were gathered and packaged in various sizes for shipment throughout the United States. Written on back of this photograph is: "Pkg Crazy Crystals 1930's" and the name "Buster."
Methodist Church - Baker Gardens - East Mountain
This photograph appears to be taken from a picture post-card, which includes the old Methodist Church, the Baker Hotel Garden, the Baker Water Storage Building, and the Welcome Sign on East Mountain. It is a rare view. The home of Druggist Dr. C. F. Yeager on NE 2nd Street in the picture was still standing at the time of this picture. During construction of his Hotel, Mr. Baker visited Hot Springs, Arkansas; and he was so impressed with the Arlington Hotel that he stopped building construction, and moved the hotel a block further west. He converted the basement, already built, into a swimming pool (only the second hotel known to have a pool at the time), and an underground laundry. The Methodist church has since been rebuilt, the water storage building has been removed, and the "Welcome" sign has been relocated further east to greet visitors from its new location overlooking Elmwood Cemetery.
[Crazy Fiz]
Products were developed to satisfy the public's search for health during the heyday of the Mineral Wells Health Industry. One of these was Crazy Fiz. Carbon dioxide was infused into mineral water under pressure to create a "Sparkling water" drink labeled "Crazy Fiz." The women in this photograph of the Crazy Water Crystal plant are packaging the Crazy Fiz for distribution. On the back of the photograph is printed "Crazy Fiz 1930's."
[The Second Crazy Water Well Drinking Pavilion]
The small building seen at the right of this picture was the First Crazy Well Drinking Pavilion. The large structure in the center of the picture is an early view of the second Pavilion, which was built in 1900. This picture was taken before its first two floors were enclosed. The Carlsbad pavilion, which was built around 1895 (across NW 1st Avenue and west of the Crazy) also appears in several pictures of the area around this time. Its absence in this photograph is probably the result of a combination of perspective, angle of picture, and depth-of-view of the camera. The Second Pavilion (shown in this photograph) was replaced in 1909 by the Crazy Flats, which burned in the fire of 1925. The current Crazy Hotel opened in 1927, and occupies the entire city block. It is now [2003] a retirement home.
[A District Baptist Meeting]
This is a picture taken by A.F. Weaver during the District Baptist Meeting of 1964, held at the high school football stadium on the west side of town. Miller Stadium, where this photograph was taken, has been replaced by a new one at the High School complex on the east side of town as of March, 2008.
[The Crazy Crystal Bottling Plant]
A picture of the interior of the Crazy Bottling Plant, ladies are shown bottling Crazy Fiz, a copyrighted beverage created by infusing cooled mineral water with carbon dioxide. The men shown here appear to be checking the process in preparation for the bottling of the Crazy Fiz, while the ladies bottle and crate the finished product for shipment. Note the plant's scrupulous cleanliness, and the fact that all employees are dressed in white.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 1: Infantry Replacement Training Center
This volume includes a time-line of events that took place in Fort Wolters from 1921 to 1973, including biographies of personnel, photographs, diagrams and a Roster of Infantry Replacement Center Officers from 1941.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 5: Military Personnel: Awards, Promotions, Retirements
This volume consists of photographs of personnel receiving awards, promotions, and retirements.
Pictorial History of Fort Wolters, Volume 7: Heliports, Stagefields, Directory
This volume consists of photographs and diagrams of stage fields such as Sundance, Mustang, Rawhide, Da Nang, Phu Loi, Soc Trang, and many others. The U.S. Army Primary Helicopter School utilized approximately 1,350 square miles of airspace.