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The Fort Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 11, No. 24, Ed. 1 Friday, December 15, 1967
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Fort Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 11, No. 25, Ed. 1 Friday, December 22, 1967
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 36, Ed. 1 Friday, March 11, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 37, Ed. 1 Friday, March 18, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 33, Ed. 1 Friday, February 18, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 35, Ed. 1 Friday, March 4, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 31, Ed. 1 Friday, February 4, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 32, Ed. 1 Friday, February 11, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 45, Ed. 1 Friday, May 13, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 46, Ed. 1 Friday, May 20, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 40, Ed. 1 Friday, April 8, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 41, Ed. 1 Friday, April 15, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 38, Ed. 1 Friday, March 25, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 39, Ed. 1 Friday, April 1, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 42, Ed. 1 Friday, April 22, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 44, Ed. 1 Friday, May 6, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 51, Ed. 1 Friday, June 24, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Fort Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 6, Ed. 1 Friday, August 5, 1966
A weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that included news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters, along with advertising.
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 47, Ed. 1 Friday, May 27, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 9, No. 50, Ed. 1 Friday, June 17, 1966
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Fort Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 11, No. 9, Ed. 1 Friday, September 1, 1967
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Fort Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 11, No. 10, Ed. 1 Friday, September 8, 1967
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Fort Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 11, No. 7, Ed. 1 Friday, August 18, 1967
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Fort Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 11, No. 8, Ed. 1 Friday, August 25, 1967
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Fort Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 11, No. 5, Ed. 1 Friday, August 4, 1967
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Fort Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 11, No. 6, Ed. 1 Friday, August 11, 1967
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Fort Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 49, Ed. 1 Friday, June 9, 1967
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Fort Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 50, Ed. 1 Friday, June 16, 1967
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Fort Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 51, Ed. 1 Friday, June 23, 1967
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Fort Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 10, No. 52, Ed. 1 Friday, June 30, 1967
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Fort Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 11, No. 11, Ed. 1 Friday, September 15, 1967
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
The Fort Wolters Trumpet (Fort Wolters, Tex.), Vol. 11, No. 12, Ed. 1 Friday, September 22, 1967
Weekly newspaper from Fort Wolters, Mineral Wells, Texas that includes news of interest to United States Army and civilian personnel at Fort Wolters along with advertising.
[Poston's Dry Goods, 13 of 15: Inside Cashier Station]
Photograph of Will Poston standing behind a desk in Poston Dry Goods and reaching up to the handle of a pulley that was part of a messenger system in the store. Part of the store is visible behind him, including boxes stacked on shelves and clothing laid out on tables.
[Partial Minutes: Mineral Wells Bicentennial Committee, November 18, 1975]
First page of the minutes of the Mineral Wells Bicentennial Committee, held in the old Nazareth Hospital in 1975. It includes a list of attendees and a summary of some of the discussion points.
A Hazy View of Mineral Wells
Photograph of the city of Mineral Wells, Texas, taken from a hill looking down at the buildings.
[The Hexagon Hotel]
The Hexagon Hotel at 701 N. Oak Avenue, opened in December 1897. The brick building to the right was the Convention Hall (built in 1925 on the foundation of the Hotel's electric plant) for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention. The Hexagon Hotel was demolished in 1959, the Convention Center in 1977.
[The Hexagon Hotel]
A picture of the Hexagon Hotel. See also "Hexagon Hotel [with history]." This picture was taken in 1925. Note the construction of the Convention Hall beside the Hexagon Hotel on the right. The Convention Hall was demolished in 1977
[The Damron Hotel Fire, 20 of 21: Different View of the Fire]
Shown here is yet another view of fire at the Damron Hotel, December 22, 1975 is shown here. The hotel was located in the 109 W. Hubbard Street. The fire also destroyed Davidson Hardware, which was in the same building, and damaged Pemberton's ( nearby appliance store) and George's Man's shop a well as damaging the back of Hill's Style Shop.
Cliff Home
The Cliff Home, an early Mineral Wells hotel, stood on NE 2nd Street (formerly Coke Street) just east of the head of NE 1st Avenue (formerly Mesquite Street), and the site of the 1912 "Old Post Office" (now the Women's Club.) The hotel burned down, and the Plateau Hotel was built in its place. That hotel, in time, became The Exchange Hotel. It was later converted to the Mineral Wells Sanitarium (or hospital) before it was finally torn down. The significance of the small "E" between "CLIFF" and "HOME" on the sign painted on the roof is not known. The back of the photograph bears the name "Henry Sikes" (a banker in Graford, and probably the donor of the picture) written in ink, and a business stamp, "S.B. Hall, General Photographer." This picture is found on page 100 of A.F. Weaver's book "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells".
[An Aerial View of Downtown Mineral Wells in 1954]
This is a picture of an aerial view of downtown Mineral Wells (taken from the Ft. Worth Star-Telegram, January 1954)at about South Oak Avenue, and looking north-northeast. Some of the buildings identifiable in the picture no longer exist. The Damron Hotel, at the middle left of the picture, burned in 1975. The Oxford Hotel/First National Bank building, one block east [right] of the Damron, near the center of the picture, burned in 1983. It has been replaced by Lynch Plaza. The Hexagon Hotel, in the upper left corner of the picture, (north and above the Crazy) was demolished in 1959. The Convention Center behind the Hexagon was demolished in 1976. Landmarks still standing are: The 13-story (including a Roof Garden) Baker Hotel, dominating the upper right of the picture; The Crazy Hotel (now [2003] a retirement home) at the upper left of the picture; and the old Post Office in the upper middle of the picture (between the Baker and Crazy Hotels), which now [2003] houses the Woman's Club. The building across the street and to the south (this side of the Baker) was demolished to make room for the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, which in turn was replaced by The First State Bank.
[An Aerial View of Mineral Wells From the Southwest]
An aerial view of Mineral Wells from the southwest is shown here. It starts about SW 4th Avenue. The photograph was taken before 1967, the year the present First Baptist Church (which is not visible on lower left of the photograph) was completed.
[A 1949 Mercury]
Illustrated here is a photograph of a 1949 Mercury that was owned by A.F.Weaver, Jr. when he sold Crazy Water Crystals in the Houston and New Orleans areas. Mr. Weaver's father moved to Mineral Wells in the 1930's to manage the Crazy Water Company's operations. Art, Jr. became a salesman for Crazy Water Crystals following World War II.
The Brain Busters
Black-face comedy was considered a socially acceptable form of entertainment until after World War II. The pamphlet suggests that "The Brain Busters" were a series of difficult questions sent in to the duo by listeners to their radio program. Further information about "Sugar Cane" and "February" (the black-face actors) is unfortunately lacking.
[The Brick Road East of Mineral Wells]
The brick highway (emphatically not yellow brick!) east of Mineral Wells (the Bankhead Highway) was the nation's first transcontinental highway, beginning at milepost 0 on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D.C. and ending at San Diego, California. Bricks for it in this area were made in Thurber, Texas (on the Palo Pinto/Erath county line). All bricks were laid by two (some say one) black masons. Bricks made in Thurber were also used to build the seawall at Galveston after the disastrous hurricane of 1900, to pave the streets of Fort Worth, and even Congress Avenue in Austin, Texas.
[A Bottle-Shaped Mineral Water Advertisement]
A picture of a mineral water advertisement, probably the cover of a flier is shown here. This is an example of the exaggerated claims made about mineral water. It advertises an "unscientific mixture of water, bottled in bond in Mineral Wells by Pleasant Memory, and marketed as 'Donkaione.' " For the (probable) interior of the flier see [Bottle-Shaped Map of Attractions]. See also [Bottle-Shaped Romantic Mineral Water Advertisement].
[The Burning of the First Crazy Hotel]
The first Crazy Hotel burned in 1925. This photograph shows the fire as it is burning out, and only a few pieces of the structure still stand. The sign seen in the left part of the photo says "Crazy Drug Co." which was the pharmacy inside the hotel. The hotel was rebuilt and claims to be fire-proof.
Carlisle House, Mineral Wells, Texas
The Carlisle House was owned and managed by Mrs. A[lexander] E[mmett] Carlisle, after the death of her husband in 1911. It was one of the largest hotels of its day, boasting sixty rooms. It was destroyed in a fire on July 4, 1914. The Abilene "Reporter" of July 5, 1914 reports that fire began its course at the Tourist Hotel (located, at the time, at 315 NW 4th street). It spread to the New Hazel Hotel (at 305 NW 4th Street), took in the Harrel House, (at 301 NW 4th street), the Lake Charles, Louisiana (511 NW 2nd Street), and the Burk House, 601 NW 3rd Avenue, as well as seven houses that were not hotels. The fire was so thorough that in 1921, the area was still devoid of buildings. It was on this site that Mordecai Ham (he who converted Billy Graham) put up a tent for a revival on March 23, 1927. He accepted the position of pastor at the First Baptist Church in Oklahoma City on June 19, 1927. He remained in that position until June 16, 1929, when he returned to the revival circuit. The Carlisle House was located in the same block as the the Mineral Wells Clinic, which was known to be in existence in 1928. It later became the Nazareth Hospital (q.v.).
[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 3 of 3: The East Side of the Construction]
This series of photographs of the construction of Mineral Wells Savings and Loan was taken in 1975. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975, to make room for the Savings and Loan. D.M. Howard was the first of five brothers to arrive from North Carolina. He later sent for his other brothers to establish the Howard Brothers Department Stores complex in the early 1900's. The Baker Hotel, directly across E. Hubbard north of the Savings and Loan, is seen to the left of the picture. Across SE 1st Street, to the south, were the Piggly Wiggly Grocery store (at the site of Mineral Wells' first Post Office) and the S & H Green Stamp store. The First State Bank now [2012] occupies this entire city block.
[A Bottle-Shaped Advertisement ]
This photograph shows an advertisement for the Gulf Texas and Western Railroad in the shape of a bottle of mineral water. In 1912, two gasoline-powered motor cars were added to the WMW&NW rolling stock to provide passenger service to Salesville, Oran, and Graford. The Golf Texas & Western Railroad,(GT&W)--sometimes referred to by locals as "Get your Ticket and Walk"--was built from Seymour through Olney and Jacksboro and contracted to operate motor coaches over part of WMW&NW north extension in 1912. The GT&W line joined the WMW&NW Railroad some 12 miles north of Mineral Wells. Although the contract for the use of WMW&NW system was signed February 6, 1912, actual operation over the WMW&NW line did not begin until March 27, 1913. The Gulf Texas and Western operated gasoline powered motor coaches, similar to the ones owned by WMW&NW, through Mineral Wells, Weatherford, Ft. Worth and on to Dallas. A round-trip from Seymour to Dallas was made daily by a 70-passenger gasoline-powered motor car. Completion of Morris Sheppard Dam and the impounding of Possum Kingdom Lake necessitated abandonment of the Salesville to Graford line (and consequently the entire GT&W line) by August 15, 1936. The reverse side of this Mineral Water advertisement indicates that the building of the railroad was underwritten by Beetham and Sons.
The "Ben Hur"
The "Ben Hur" motor car is shown on Mesquite Street (the 200 block of NE 1st Avenue), Mineral Wells, Texas. This new and larger gasoline-powered car joined two "Dinky Cars" (Esther and Susie--named for the daughters of the railroad's co-owner, banker Cicero Smith) on the Mineral Wells Lakewood Park and Scenic Railway in 1908. The railway ceased operation in 1909, a year after the larger car was added to the fleet. Mineral Wells was probably one of the few cities in the United States which had gasoline-powered street cars. One of the boys shown standing beside it is Mr. Whatley of local automobile fame. This photograph is shown on page 74 of "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", Second Edition. The Scenic Railway, on which the "Dinky Cars" operated, was owned by banker Cicero Smith; and Ed Dismuke, owner of the Famous Water Company. It carried passengers every quarter-hour from Mineral Wells around the south flank of West Mountain to the recreation area of Lake Pinto. A 'round trip fare was fifteen cents. Dismuke's Famous Mineral Water wells were located around Lake Pinto, and water was pumped over the mountain to the Famous Water Company and its drinking pavilion. The building on the left edge of the picture with the arched windows was M.H. Coleman's Clothing and Shoes for gentlemen. It was later occupied by Wallace Distributing Company. The building still stands diagonally northwest across NE 1st. Avenue from the Baker Hotel.