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[The Mineral Wells Bottling Works]
A number of the early mineral water wells bottled their product and sold it nationwide for its reputed health benefits. The name of this particular well, associated with this turn-of-the-20th-century endeavor, is not identified. It may well have been the inventor of the bottled water industry. This photograph shows what has been tentatively identified as a threshing machine, driven by a steam-powered tractor, parked outside the plant. This bottling plant also produced "Country Red" and "Cream soda" in 1906. J.L. Tipton is shown, fourth from the left. The other men remain unidentified. The photograph dates from 1912. This bottling company also bottled "Country Red" and "Cream soda" in 1912. J.L. Tipton is shown, fourth from the left. The other men remain unidentified. Later development of a crystallizing process eliminated the substantial cost of shipping water, and adversely affected the bottled water industry. The concentrated crystals greatly expanded the distribution of beneficial minerals said to be inherent in the water, and created an industry of its own. However, it led to legal problems occasioned by the limited supply of crystals, and attempts to satisfy a voracious market. What appears to be a scar across the photograph indicates that the original picture was probably damaged, and was repaired by Mr. Weaver for the making of a duplicate photograph.
[A Mineral Wells Electric System Trolley Car]
A Major Beardsley, a Canadian who fought for Maine in the Civil War, (And reported by the Abilene "Daily Reporter" of 1905 to be of Gibstown, Iowa) was granted a franchise to construct a railway street system in 1906. He was also granted a 99-year franchise for the generation and sale of electricity in Mineral Wells. He also bought about 600 acres of land, and established three additions: Lowe Place addition, Lawn Place, Lawn Terrace, and Elmhurst Park, which came to sport a dance pavilion and a Casino. The Beardsley enterprise ended with the notice that the workers for his interurban (from Mineral Wells, Peaster, Millsap, and Weatherford) had not been paid. Beasley himself was in New Orleans at the time. Beardsley's trustee, a Mr. W.B. Smith,and the City of Mineral Wells, sued Beardsley's creditors. A judgment awarded Smith the sum of $15,000, and gave the City of Mineral Wells some sixty acres--which included Elmhurst Park. The legal battle continued beyond 1917, when the decision was reversed and remanded by the Court of Civil appeals for Texas. Number 23 trolley car is illustrated here.
[Mineral Wells Firemen , about 1907]
Photograph of a group of men posing for a photograph on a firetruck. Front Row: Guy Croft, Henry Russell, J W (Buck) Thomas, Jube Warren, Holland Cogdell, Bill Deck (mask on), Bob Bozzell, Oscar Bish -Chief- , John Moore. Top Row - John Gill, Ben McGowen, D.E. Odell, Henry Briley, Arthur Ford, Arthur Howard, C.H. Alexander, Henry Hester, J.W. Birdwell, Ernest Wallace, Reginald Cogdell (driver). 18 are known to be deceased." Then, in Mr. Weaver's handwriting again, "All but three deceased."
[Mineral Wells' First Public School Erected in 1884]
This rock structure is now [2008] a museum dedicated to the preservation of the history of the city. There was some construction around the school at the time of this photograph, probably due to the building of Mineral Wells' first high school, the West Ward School, on the same lot, next door to and north of the little Rock School in 1902.
A Mineral Wells Public Schools Certificate of Promotion
A certificate of Promotion from Mineral Wells Public Schools, certifying that Floy Stone has completed the 8th grade in May 1903 is shown here. It is signed by B. C. Osborn.
Mineral Wells Volunteer Fire Department (Souvenir)
Shown here is the cover of a souvenir booklet published for the benefit of the Mineral Wells Volunteer Fire Department in 1906. It was issued as part of the Firemen's Pension and Relief Fund
Mosquito Street, Looking North, Mineral Wells, Texas
Shown here is a postcard, reading "Mosquito Street [actually Mesquite Street], Looking North, Mineral Wells, Texas." Please note the Chautauqua Theater (1905-1912) at the end of the street. This picture was taken before street car tracks were installed in 1907. Also note the the absence of cars on the street--only horses and buggies.
[Newspaper Clipping of Mineral Wells School, Texas]
A newspaper clipping with a photograph of a Mineral Wells School. This clipping had been mounted in a scrapbook, and the legible portion of the caption says, "Mineral Wells School, Texas." The whole caption read: Mineral Wells College. [sic]--A School for Both Sexes The building, which the Weatherford Democrat of September 12, 1895 says would be built in Mineral Wells (It would have been in Romanesque architecture), was to offer "Classical, Scientific, English, Music, Elocution, and Art Courses" . Professor J. McCracken was the head of the school. The building was never built, because the state provided education up to (but not including) college. A need for further education was not felt. .
[The Norwood Hospital]
A photograph of the Norwood Hospital during its completion. Note the "Parry and Spicer Architects" sign and the "Goodrum, Murphy and Croft Contractors" sign. Dr. Norwood was the first Osteopathic doctor to set up business in Mineral Wells. He departed this life at the age of 82 in 1953. The building was donated to the Mineral Wells Historic Foundation. Plans were announced to convert the clinic to a Bed and Breakfast facility, but no progress towards such a conversion has been made to date [2007]. The legend "1863" appears on the photograph, but it is not known what it signifies. It cannot possibly be the date of the building--or of its photograph.
Old Elmhurst Park , Allen & Charles,1907
Two people are shown standing on the wooden bridge at Elmhust Park, Mineral Wells, in 1907. A holograph inscription on the photograph that reads "Old Elmhurst Park, Allen & Charles, 1907", probably refers to the man and boy in the picture. Elmhurst Park, a very popular recreation area during its heyday, was located in southwest Mineral Wells at the end of the streetcar line. Patrons walked from the streetcar (in the background) across the wooden bridge to the Casino and other attractions.
Palo Pinto County Star. (Palo Pinto, Tex.), Vol. 25, No. 16, Ed. 1 Friday, November 9, 1900
A weekly newspaper from Palo Pinto, Texas that included local, state, and national news along with advertising.
[A Post Card of a Football Team]
This postcard, taken around 1909, features the Mineral Wells High School football team. Please note the guards, hanging around their necks, that were used to protect the noses of the players. Those guards were held in place by means of a strap that went around the head, and were further kept in place by clenching the teeth on a rubber bit on the inside of the guard. The back of the card lists the players' names from top left: 1) Jessie Turner, 2) Tulane Smith, 3) J.C. Hayes, 4) Faburt Holmes , 5) George Oliver, 6) Blake Turner, 7) Bertram Hedrich, 8) Lamar McNew, and 9) Mr. Dinsmore. Front row 10) Carodine Hootin 11) Gordon Whatley, 12) Vernon Durham, 13) Fred McClurhin, 14) Achie Holdrige, 15) Chester Baughn, and 16) Hugh Brewster. Jess Turner(1) was later a member of Mineral Wells' only undefeated team in 1912. C.N. Turner, father of teammates Jess(1) and Blake Turner(6), purchased one of the early telephone companies in Palo Pinto County. He operated it with his sons as a family business. Jess Turner became a pioneer in the telephone business, and purchased the other family interests in 1924 to become sole owner of the family enterprise. His son, Jess Turner, Jr., operated the telephone company following World war II, relinquishing his position in October of 1975. A modern viewer of this picture might be startled by the lack of body armor, but it must be remembered that during the early decades of the twentieth century football was a blood sport. Injuries--even fatalities--on the field were an expected event. Many university presidents had disbanded teams (after numerous fatalities on the field) and banned the sport from their campuses. The first Rose Bowl game (Stamford versus. Ann Arbor) in 1903 was such a brutal rout that the ...
Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells
Written on the back of the photograph is: "Presbyterian Church & Manse N.W. 4th Ave. & [NW]2nd St. Built 1896, Burned 1908" This was the first Presbyterian Church of Mineral Wells. It was replaced, after it burned in 1908, at the same location the next year by a unique domed church that endured for some seventy years. Deterioration of the foundation of the second church building dictated its prudent replacement by a third building at this same location in the early 1980's.
[R.L. Polk & Co.'s Mineral Wells City Directory, 1909]
The city directory for Mineral Wells, 1909, embracing a complete alphabetical list of business firms and private citizens; a directory of city and county officials, churches, public and private schools, banks, asylums, hospitals, commercial bodies, secret societies, street and avenue guide, etc.
Sangcura Sprudel Water
A pamphlet advertising "Sangcura Sprudel Water," describing the various uses of the mineral water and the salts derived by evaporating the water is shown here.
Sangcura Sprudel Wells
The Sangcura Sprudel Wells. On back of photograph is written: "Located at 800 N.W. 2nd Avenue." The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street. The porches were enclosed and it was turned into a rooming house. The building burned down in 1973.
Sangcura Sprudel Wells
The Sangcura-Sprudel Wells Drinking Pavilion was originally located at 800 NW Second Avenue. The building was later moved to 314 NW 5th Street, the porches enclosed, and it was converted into a rooming house. The Crazy Water bottling plant was built on this site in 1919. The rooming house that was the former Sangcura-Sprudel drinking Pavilion burned on December 5, 1973, just five minutes before Mineral Wells' annual Christmas Parade was scheduled to start.
[The Second Crazy Water Well Drinking Pavilion]
The small building seen at the right of this picture was the First Crazy Well Drinking Pavilion. The large structure in the center of the picture is an early view of the second Pavilion, which was built in 1900. This picture was taken before its first two floors were enclosed. The Carlsbad pavilion, which was built around 1895 (across NW 1st Avenue and west of the Crazy) also appears in several pictures of the area around this time. Its absence in this photograph is probably the result of a combination of perspective, angle of picture, and depth-of-view of the camera. The Second Pavilion (shown in this photograph) was replaced in 1909 by the Crazy Flats, which burned in the fire of 1925. The current Crazy Hotel opened in 1927, and occupies the entire city block. It is now [2003] a retirement home.
Souvenir...Mineral Wells Volunteer Fire Department
Shown here is the cover of a souvenir booklet about the Mineral Wells, Texas, Volunteer Fire Department,published in 1906.
[A Souvenir Photograph of a Donkey Ride up East Mountain]
Entertainment for the many visitors to Mineral Wells around the turn of the twentieth century was provided, in part, by donkey rides up a trail to the top of East Mountain. The donkey trail crossed a 1,000-step staircase, built in 1905, to the top of the mountain about half-way up. Photographers, first J.C. McClure and then J.L. Young, took souvenir photographs of the visitors at this crossing. This photograph of the Belcher family was a taken by J. D. McClure. Mr. John M. Belcher stands on the right and his son, John E. Belcher sits on a donkey at the left of the picture, with his mother standing beside him. The clothing suggests that the picture was taken in the early 1900's. The legend "19EE" in the lower left-hand part of the picture invites speculation concerning its significance.
[The St. Nicholas Hotel]
A group of men stand in front of the St. Nicholas Hotel. A colophon at the lower right designates this picture as a photographic souvenir from Minerals Wells, taken by Dan W. Evans. The building had a varied history. It was first (in 1904) an unnamed two-and-one-half-story sanitarium, then re-named the St. Nicholas Hotel, and then later it became the Delaware Hotel. It was located at N. Oak and NE 3rd Street. The building was eventually consumed by fire on October of 1907. The back of photograph has a T and P Railway logotype and this information about the Jericho Fine Photo Company: "Mountain and Donkey Groups, View Souvenirs and Scenery of Min-Wells, Kodak Supplies and Finishing, Button and Stamp Photos a Specialty. Dan W. Evans Prop. Min Wells, Tex."
The Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 12, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 7, 1904
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
The Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 14, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 21, 1904
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
The Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 15, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 28, 1904
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 29, Ed. 1 Thursday, November 10, 1904
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 41, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 2, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 43, Ed. 1 Thursday, February 16, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 46, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 9, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 47, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 16, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 49, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 30, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 50, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 6, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 51, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 13, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 1, No. 52, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 20, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 1, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 27, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 2, Ed. 1 Thursday, May 4, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 3, Ed. 1 Thursday, May 11, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 4, Ed. 1 Thursday, May 18, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 5, Ed. 1 Thursday, May 25, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 7, Ed. 1 Thursday, June 8, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 8, Ed. 1 Thursday, June 15, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 10, Ed. 1 Thursday, June 29, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 11, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 6, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 12, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 13, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 13, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 20, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 14, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 27, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 15, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 3, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 16, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 10, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 17, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 17, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 18, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 24, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
Strawn Enterprise. (Strawn, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 19, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 31, 1905
Weekly newspaper from Strawn, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.