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[The Milling Sanatorium]
Dr. H. H. Milling was the first of Mineral Wells' "rubbin' doctors." He operated the Mineral Wells Sanatorium at 315 NW 1st Avenue before building this sanitarium in the 2500 block of SE 6th Avenue - the old Millsap Highway) about 1929. The building was later sold and renamed Irvine Sanitarium. It now [2010] belongs to the Veterans of Foreign Wars, is located at 1400 SE VFW Highway (a branch of SE 6th Avenue), and houses VFW Post 2399. Dr. Milling also owned 60 acres on Pollard Creek in north Mineral Wells that were donated to the state of Texas to use as a State Park, which became SP8. During the Great Depression of the 1930's, the WPA and the CCC made several additions to that park to improve its recreational value: Bridges, a small dam, steps up the mountain, restrooms, etc., all using native sandstone. When Milling Park was determined by the state to be surplus property, it was deeded to the city and later renamed North City Park.
[Milling's Sanitarium and Water Well ]
The gazebo-like structure shown in the picture protects a water pump in front of the Milling Sanitarium. The sanitarium was built about 1929 on what was then the 2500 block of Southeast 6th Avenue. It later became the Irvine Sanitarium. The Veterans of Foreign Wars (Post 2399) occupies the building as of 2010. The fate of the structure shown here is unknown.
Mineral Wells (1900)
This article and photograph from the Weaver Collection appeared in the Mineral Wells Index in the late 1960's--or possibly the early 1970's. The newspaper attributes the photograph to the "Courtesy of Tom Green," and the research to "Bill Cameron." The article states: "This is the way Mineral Wells looked at the turn of the [twentieth] Century. The Scott Livery Stable, foreground, is occupies the area the Whatley Motor Company does today. Across the street at left was the two-story Holmes Hotel. The barn in the corner, in the center of picture, was the T.J. Green Transfer Company. Mat Birdwell, who purchased horses for the government, had his headquarters in the Green barn. Other spots include the Frost Lumber Yard, next to the Green barn; [the] old Baptist Church steeples, top left; [the] Presbyterian Church, top right, that burned 60 years ago."
[A Mineral Wells Advertisement]
A 1906 seasonal advertisement, compliments Central Texas Realty Association, depicts a young lady (An Art Nouveau goddess?) half-kneeling within a frame that suggests stained glass. She is holding a water jug, from which pours a stream of healing elixir that splashes into the lowermost center of the brochure. Decorative scrolls reminiscent of wrought iron sculpture decorate the advertisement. Stars, both in the advertisement and on the lady's tiara, hint that Mineral Wells is the City of Light. What appears to be a coffee stain shows at the upper left. Someone has penciled "1905" in the upper right corner.
[The Mineral Wells Annual Fair]
Typewritten on the back of the photograph (probably by A.F. Weaver)is: "We attended the Mineral Wells annual fair at the Dance Pavilion at Elmhurst Park." The photograph is probably a copy of an earlier image.
[The Mineral Wells Bottling Works]
A number of the early mineral water wells bottled their product and sold it nationwide for its reputed health benefits. The name of this particular well, associated with this turn-of-the-20th-century endeavor, is not identified. It may well have been the inventor of the bottled water industry. This photograph shows what has been tentatively identified as a threshing machine, driven by a steam-powered tractor, parked outside the plant. This bottling plant also produced "Country Red" and "Cream soda" in 1906. J.L. Tipton is shown, fourth from the left. The other men remain unidentified. The photograph dates from 1912. This bottling company also bottled "Country Red" and "Cream soda" in 1912. J.L. Tipton is shown, fourth from the left. The other men remain unidentified. Later development of a crystallizing process eliminated the substantial cost of shipping water, and adversely affected the bottled water industry. The concentrated crystals greatly expanded the distribution of beneficial minerals said to be inherent in the water, and created an industry of its own. However, it led to legal problems occasioned by the limited supply of crystals, and attempts to satisfy a voracious market. What appears to be a scar across the photograph indicates that the original picture was probably damaged, and was repaired by Mr. Weaver for the making of a duplicate photograph.
[The Mineral Wells Convention Hall and the Hexagon Hotel]
The Hexagon was the first electrically-lighted hotel in Mineral Wells. The Convention Hall was built, in part, on the foundation of the Hexagon's DC power plant. The Convention Hall was built for the West Texas Chamber of Commerce Convention, which was held in 1925.
Mineral Wells Drug Store
The Mineral Wells Drug was located at 110 N. Mesquite Avenue about 1910. Charles Pollard was the manager. The date of this picture is unknown, but it is conjectured (from the dress of the people pictured) to have been taken in the early twentieth century. Please note the scant electric lighting. Also note the (working?) brass spittoon in front of the cigar display. Customers, presumably having a light meal, are located in the far back.
[A Mineral Wells Electric System Trolley Car]
A Major Beardsley, a Canadian who fought for Maine in the Civil War, (And reported by the Abilene "Daily Reporter" of 1905 to be of Gibstown, Iowa) was granted a franchise to construct a railway street system in 1906. He was also granted a 99-year franchise for the generation and sale of electricity in Mineral Wells. He also bought about 600 acres of land, and established three additions: Lowe Place addition, Lawn Place, Lawn Terrace, and Elmhurst Park, which came to sport a dance pavilion and a Casino. The Beardsley enterprise ended with the notice that the workers for his interurban (from Mineral Wells, Peaster, Millsap, and Weatherford) had not been paid. Beasley himself was in New Orleans at the time. Beardsley's trustee, a Mr. W.B. Smith,and the City of Mineral Wells, sued Beardsley's creditors. A judgment awarded Smith the sum of $15,000, and gave the City of Mineral Wells some sixty acres--which included Elmhurst Park. The legal battle continued beyond 1917, when the decision was reversed and remanded by the Court of Civil appeals for Texas. Number 23 trolley car is illustrated here.
[The Mineral Wells Fair of 1908]
Farm products, such as home-canned food items, fresh produce, and plant specimens are displayed here, within the Dance Pavilion at Elmhurst Park at the 1908 Mineral Wells Annual Fair, a Palo Pinto County Fair exhibit.
[The Mineral Wells Fire Department in 1975]
Photograph of a group of firefighters posing in front of a firetruck. Shown in the top row are: Rene James, Weldon Hood, Jerry Kidwell, Walter Carter, Jerry Loftis. In the middle row: Eddie Bell, Eldred Fryer, Horace Roe, Bud Smith, Joe Knight, Kenneth Kinder. In the front row: B.H. "Tiny" Gilstrap, Eddie Fryer, Melton Brewton (Chief), Jerry Van Natta, Allen Fryer, Rickey Epperson, Larry Clutts, Louis Clutts, Butch Clutts, Gene Knerr, Davis Light, John Gilbert, Byron Kizziah, Bazil Wright, R.S. Purcell, W.G. Mullins, Sam Smith, Arthur Schulte, Cecil Holifield. Information for these names was taken from the back of photograph.
[Mineral Wells Firemen , about 1907]
Photograph of a group of men posing for a photograph on a firetruck. Front Row: Guy Croft, Henry Russell, J W (Buck) Thomas, Jube Warren, Holland Cogdell, Bill Deck (mask on), Bob Bozzell, Oscar Bish -Chief- , John Moore. Top Row - John Gill, Ben McGowen, D.E. Odell, Henry Briley, Arthur Ford, Arthur Howard, C.H. Alexander, Henry Hester, J.W. Birdwell, Ernest Wallace, Reginald Cogdell (driver). 18 are known to be deceased." Then, in Mr. Weaver's handwriting again, "All but three deceased."
[Mineral Wells' First Police Department]
Mineral Wells' first Police Department is shown on horseback here. On the far left is Jim Barrett, Chief, and in the middle is Paul Granbury. The man on the right remains unknown. This photograph comes from A. F. Weaver's, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", page 153. The picture appears to have been taken at the photographer's souvenir picture stand on the donkey trail about halfway up East Mountain. J. C. McClure, an early photographer, first owned the donkeys for the trail; but he was killed while riding a wild stallion on Oak Avenue. J. L. Young and his wife took over the photographer's stand. They built a rock house, here as a background, for souvenir pictures. In 1895, a policeman (C.M. Harris) was appointed as City Marshall." A night watchman (A. Scott) was also appointed. Their respective duties were primarily fire prevention and keeping livestock from roaming the streets; and seeing to it that businesses were properly locked up. Boys under the age of 17 were forbidden from roaming the streets at night (under pain of a $10 fine). C.M. Harris was elected to his position in 1896, at a salary of $60 per month. In 1889, upon the sudden death of Frank Johnson, Harris was appointed Interim Marshall to "Inspect and supervise all premises and places of business." J.I. Johnson became night watchmen at the salary of $12.50, and he was charged with roaming the streets at nights to be on the lookout for fire. The City Marshall was expected to corral any stray dogs--and kill them if they were unclaimed. He was to remove the carcasses from the city limits afterwards. in 19001, an ordinance was passed forbidding the possession of pigeons in the city--the control of which fell to the City Marshall. [Note: Several kinds of dove ...
[Mineral Wells' First Public School]
Mineral Wells' first public school was erected in 1884, and located on what is now [2008] NW 5th Avenue. The building is now used as a museum.
[Mineral Wells' First Public School Erected in 1884]
This rock structure is now [2008] a museum dedicated to the preservation of the history of the city. There was some construction around the school at the time of this photograph, probably due to the building of Mineral Wells' first high school, the West Ward School, on the same lot, next door to and north of the little Rock School in 1902.
[The Mineral Wells Golf Country Club and Lake]
Please note the men in golf attire standing on bank, one of whom is holding a bag of golf clubs. Knee-length knickers with decorated socks were typical golf wear in the Roaring Twenties. Others are lounging around on the bank between club house and lake on a typical lazy Sunday afternoon.
Mineral Wells Graphic. (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 2, No. 35, Ed. 1 Friday, January 8, 1897
Weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.
The Mineral Wells Guide
The Mineral Wells Guide, as it itself proclaims, was published for the out-of-town visitor. It contains facts about Mineral Wells, instructions about how to reach Mineral Wells, the water and baths to be found there, the Milling Sanatorium, recreation in the city, and various advertisements.
Mineral Wells Hardware
The sign painted on the side of the store proclaims that this building is the Mineral Wells Hardware Company. Located at 212 SE 1st Avenue, it was owned by Mssrs. Smith & Frost. It was later bought by L.E. Seaman. In 1975, it became the location of Widlake Motor Supply. The picture appears on page 126 of A. F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...."
[Mineral Wells Heritage Association, 1975]
This picture immortalizes the signing of the 25-year lease at $25 per year of the 1884 Little Rock School building for the purpose of establishing it as a museum. Pictured, left to right are: A. F. Weaver, President of the Mineral Wells Heritage Association; L. Gordon Nelson, Vice President; Mrs. Gordon Nelson, Chairperson for the Restoration Committee. Seated is Bill Hall, Superintendent of Mineral Wells Schools. The photograph was taken in July, 1975. The Little Rock School, in 2007, remains a museum dedicated to the preservation of the History of Mineral Wells. This picture appears in "Time Was in Mineral Wells...." on page 173.
[Mineral Wells High School]
This view of Mineral Wells High School, taken from the east in 1940, shows the 1884 "Little Rock School House" (Mineral Wells' first public school) on the north side of the high school. The larger school was built at 101 NW 5th Avenue in 1915. The second high school in Mineral Wells, it still [2008] stands. Three other high schools have been built since the last class graduated from this one in 1955.
[Mineral Wells High School]
This photograph was taken at the completion of Mineral Wells High School in 1915. The Mineral Wells Independent School District donated the building to the Fifty Year Club in 2007.
Mineral Wells High School
We have here a view from the south of Mineral Wells' High School, built in 1915 at 101 NW 5th Avenue. This side of the building faces W. Hubbard Street. The tower atop the West Ward School can be seen below the skyline, and to the left, above the high school. (The West Ward school was torn down in 1930.)
[The Mineral Wells High School Band in the Bicentennial Parade]
The Mineral Wells High School Band in the "Time Was" Bicentennial Parade of 1976 (celebrating the United States Bicentennial) is shown here, as taken from a perspective looking northeast at intersection of N. Oak Avenue (Highway 281 left to right) and E. Hubbard Street (Highway 180, one-way right to left.)
[A Mineral Wells High School Commencement Program of 1968]
A Commencement program from Mineral Wells High School, that took place on May 24, 1968. Note its small size, as shown by the ruler next to it.
[The Mineral Wells High School Concert Band]
This picture, showing the concert band of the Mineral Wells High School Marching Band (standing on the steps of the school) was taken around 1922. James Walker Calvert is on the top row at the far right. Mr. Brunswick, the bandleader, is on the front row at the far left. Ellis White is the trombone player on the left. See also "Mineral Wells High School Marching Band."
[The Mineral Wells High School Marching Band]
The Mineral Wells High School marching band is shown here performing on a football field in the late 1930's. The band director at that time was Mr. Dave Brunswick. See also "Mineral Wells High School Concert Band."
[Mineral Wells High School's First Graduating Class, 1903]
Shown in this picture are, from left to right: Maggie McDaniel, Annabel Cushman, Myra Hunt Oliver and (Valedictorian) Ferdinand "Doc" Howard. The title of his valedictory address was "The Electrical Age." The diplomas were presented by Judge F.C. Highsmith. This photograph is to be found in the second edition of "Time Was..." by A. F. Weaver on page 189.
Mineral Wells Index (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. [], No. [], Ed. 1 Monday, October 2, 1972
Daily newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising.
Mineral Wells Index (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 13, No. 924, Ed. 1 Thursday, July 19, 1945
Daily newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising.
Mineral Wells Index (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 14, No. 105, Ed. 1 Wednesday, February 20, 1946
Daily newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising.
Mineral Wells Index (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 31, No. 258, Ed. 1 Sunday, March 1, 1931
Daily newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising.
Mineral Wells Index (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 31, No. 268, Ed. 1 Thursday, March 12, 1931
Daily newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising.
Mineral Wells Index (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 31, No. 286, Ed. 1 Thursday, April 2, 1931
Daily newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising.
Mineral Wells is 100% for "Ike" Sablosky
Two boys,wearing flat paper caps,are shown here holding a sign that proclaims that Mineral Wells is "100% for 'Ike' Sablosky." The occasion is presumably a sports event--as suggested by the background. Details concerning Sablosky may be found in other pictures in this collection--under his name.
[The Mineral Wells Mounted Police]
A copy of a newspaper clipping, the caption identifies members of the Mineral Wells Mounted Police "57 years ago." Identified are: "Uncle Billy Wood" on his white horse (not a member of the force); Bob Pate; Paul Craig; Jim Barrett, probably Chief of Police at the time; Paul Granbury. All are reported to be deceased at time of printing. The picture was furnished to the paper courtesy Mrs. Paul Granbury. The sign on the building at the far left of the picture has been tentatively identified as a Livery Stable. Though the sign is visible, the distance has made its contents extremely obscure. The first city hall was located at the corner of First Avenue and Third Street, with a fence to hold impounded livestock. The rounding up of stray livestock was the primary duty of the mounted police in 1910. Two more more individuals were also forbidden to fight in public; no-one was permitted to use obscene language; playing cards for liquor. The renting of houses for the playing of cards was also forbidden. Teams were not allowed to be unhitched while attached to wagons, and vagrants were fined $10- In short, the police team were kept busy. These details are taken from "The Mineral wells Police Department 1882-1988" by Kaye Ashby, in the custody of the Boyce Ditto Library.
[Mineral Wells' Municipal Airport]
An aerial View of Mineral Wells Municipal Airport and Downing (named after Colonel Wayne Downing, who was killed in a stateside accident) Heliport is shown here. In 1946, the City of Mineral Wells obtained use of the airport, although the Department of Defense retained an "Emergency-use" provision until 1966--after which year it was not renewed. In April 1966, the Department of Defense leased 970 acres from the City of Mineral Wells to build a heliport ("To improve helicopter training", it was stated) that was due to be completed by September of that year. The Fort Wolters "Trumpet" reported the progress of the construction of the heliport in detail in its subsequent numbers.
Mineral Wells News (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 26, No. 39, Ed. 1 Tuesday, September 17, 1957
Weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising.
[A Mineral Wells Orchestra]
Shown here is a clipping from a newspaper, showing the Mineral Wells Orchestra. Members are, top row: John Nance, Jeff Reimar, John (last name unknown) and an unidentified mandolin player; middle row is a string guitar quartet consisting of: Mrs. J.E. Johnson, Mrs. R. L. Yeager, Mrs. P. E. Bock, and an unidentified fourth lady; front row: Mrs. J.D. Cranford, John Muns, an unidentified person (perhaps a trombonist), and Mrs. I. N. Wynn. The clipping was cut short; some information is clearly missing.
[The Mineral Wells Police Force and City/County Ambulance Service]
Shown here is a picture of the Mineral Wells Police force and the City/County Ambulance Service, taken in 1974. From left to right are: Bennie Hutcheson, R.A. Hodges, Jim Elmore, Jimmy Davis, Walter Graves, Orville West, Montiford Parker, Henry Childress, Don Farriel, Larry Brandenburg, Bill Meaders, Raymond Jones, Mike Poe, Ricky Shank, Fred Foreman (Police Chief), Gene Knerr, Gilbert Sommerfield (Investigator), David Jared, and Ronnie Edwards. The information was taken from the back of photograph, which itself was taken at the West City Park. It is published on page 153 of A.F.Weaver's book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells."
[Mineral Wells Policemen]
On back of this photograph is written: "T. Row. L to R. Harry Shuffler, Gilbert Summerfield, L.D. Hill, Bill Patton & Odie Heath 1953 B. Row L. to R. Chief Frank Granbury, B Lain (probably "Blain") Price, John Fletcher, E. Scott Tobey & Alfred A Perkins" The picture was donated to the Mineral Wells Heritage Association on February 12, 1988, by Scott Tobey.
A Mineral Wells Public Schools Certificate of Promotion
A certificate of Promotion from Mineral Wells Public Schools, certifying that Floy Stone has completed the 8th grade in May 1903 is shown here. It is signed by B. C. Osborn.
Mineral Wells Reporter (Mineral Wells, Tex.), Vol. 6, No. 46, Ed. 1 Thursday, November 16, 1978
Weekly newspaper from Mineral Wells, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with extensive advertising.
Mineral Wells Sanitarium
The Mineral Wells Sanitarium was located at 315 NW 1st Avenue. It was built by Mssrs. Blake Barber and H. M. Coleman, who were fashioning the "First building of this magnitude erected at Mineral Wells." It was listed in 1905 as being leased by Doctors J.M. Massie, and R. G. Braswell. It was later owned and operated by B.H. Milling before he built the Milling Sanitarium. The building burned in June of 1907, (as reported by the El Paso Daily Times in July 1907) with a loss estimated at $40,000. The inmates were all rescued--some narrowly. The fire started at the skating rink of the Palace Amusement Company, (a building valued at $5,000) which had just been finished, but not opened to the public. The Mineral Wells Bath House (which was empty at the time) was also a total loss, as was the Lithia Pavilion. Part of the Wann Hotel was destroyed along with thirty small frame structures. The total loss will be about $100,000 (as the same newspaper reports it). It was later torn down and replaced by Willimann's Pharmacy. The area was vacant before the sanitarium was built. Donkeys were pastured on it, but the wind brought notice of them to the guests in the Crazy Hotel, and they were forcibly removed. Currently [2010], the Woodsmen of the World club resides at this location.
Mineral Wells Sanitorium
An early edition of the Mineral wells "Index" states that two doctors have leased this building, but further details are not as yet [2014] forthcoming.
[The Mineral Wells Savings and Loan]
The Mineral Wells Savings and Loan was once located at 101 SE 1st Avenue. The First State Bank stands at this location as of 2008.
[The Mineral Wells Savings and Loan--and Lynch Plaza Parking Lot]
The Mineral Wells Savings and Loan was once located at 101 SE 1st Avenue. The Savings and Loan building, in this 1988 view (looking south down SE 1st Avenue), is in the left foreground on the southeast corner of Hubbard and 1st Avenue. Across SE 1st Avenue (to the right and west of the Savings and Loan) is the parking lot for Lynch Plaza. In the background, the next street south is SE 1st Street. The Dollar General store occupies the former Piggly Wiggly grocery store on the southeast corner of this next block (near the center of the picture), where Mineral Wells' first Post Office once stood. The Savings and Loan building was eventually torn down, and the First State Bank is now [2008] at this location.
[Mineral Wells Steam Laundry]
An edition of the Mineral Wells Daily Index for May 6, 1902 (Volume VIII, Number 1) states that the Steam Laundry had already been in operation for six years. A certain J. W. Beasley was listed as the manager. The article associated with the photograph of the Steam Laundry goes on to state that "2 additions have been added." It continues to boast much the same perquisites of the trade as do more modern-day laundries: "Thoroughly modern equipment", "A...competent staff", and "The best" service available anywhere in the city. "Pure, artesian [sic] water" was reputed to have been used in the cleaning process. A legend on the back of this photograph reads: "200 Block of NE 7th St." (The Daily Index of 1902 gives the address as "North Wichita Street.")
Mineral Wells, Texas
A pamphlet about the various services and attractions in and around Mineral Wells, Texas, with many photographic illustrations, extols the allurements of Mineral in an effusive nineteenth-century prose, that was probably archaic for the time of the pamphlet.
MINERAL WELLS TEXAS CARLSBAD WATER
This picture appears to be a label taken from a container of mineral water sold by the Texas Carlsbad Water Company. The label describes the water as "Purgative" and "Diuretic." DIRECTIONS state further: The average person requires from 8 to 12 glasses per day, but there are those who need less, and others for whom this quantity will not suffice. Hence drink such quantity as gives desired effect, be it small or great. One or two glasses taken hot, half hour before breakfast, will be found very effective. The label ends with the legend: This Label Censored [sic] by the Parker-Palo Pinto Co. Medical Society.