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Mineral Wells, "The Carlsbad of America"
Booklet about the history of, the various services available at, and the attractions in and around Mineral Wells, ("The Carlsbad of America")Texas. Published in 1905, it contains many photographic illustrations and a local map. Please note the colophon at the bottom of the pamphlet: "An empire--a nation within a nation."
Mineral Wells Volunteer Fire Department (Souvenir)
Shown here is the cover of a souvenir booklet published for the benefit of the Mineral Wells Volunteer Fire Department in 1906. It was issued as part of the Firemen's Pension and Relief Fund
[A Mineral Wells Water Cartoon]
Graphic representation of the combined effects of four common mineral concentrations of blended mineral water produced in Mineral Wells, Texas; it shows four bottles spouting water that form a stream of "Health and Happiness" to repel a skeleton (labeled "Disease") and other symbols of medicine (crutches, a wheelchair, and "Patent Medicine" Bottle). A flag over the water jugs says "Mineral Wells, the strongest fort in the world."
Mineral Wells Yesterday And Today
The caption to this picture indicates that there are two of them, taken from a common vantage point. This photograph dates from June, 1895, and it was taken from under the original Welcome sign. The view is to the southwest. The Methodist Church (the large white church with steeple) is in the foreground near the lower left corner. Above it, and slightly to its right (near the left edge and middle foreground), is an old two-story stone building which was occupied by the Bank of Mineral Wells. The second photograph, of Mineral Wells in a later time, is unfortunately not provided.
[A Mini-Park]
The women of Mineral Wells beautified the town by planting vacant lots. This "Mini-park" was located in the 200 block of Hubbard Street, and is now [2008] a parking lot adjacent to Murray's Grill.
[A Minstrel Show Program]
Shown here is presumably the program for a minstrel show (given in November of 1916) sponsored by the B.P.O.E. Please observe the advertisements (that presumably paid for the printing) on both the front and the back.
[A Model of Hexagon Hotel--and Elizabeth Sickels]
Illustrated here is picture of a model of the Hexagon Hotel (and the only living daughter of David Galbraith, Elizabeth Sickels) that was taken about 1977. The model is now located in the Mineral Wells Historical Association's Rock School House.
Moisture and Clouds
This booklet gives an overview of moisture and cloud formations as they relate to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information about "Cloud formation, international classification, abbreviations, and symbols" as well as "General flight conditions associated with stratiform and cumuliform clouds." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page.
Montgomery Ward & Co.
The front of the photograph obviously reads: Montgomery Ward & Co. A hand-written legend reads: Mineral Wells, Texas Aug 24th 1929 The back reads: North Oak Ave. Built in 1929 Copyright A.F. Weaver. The Montgomery Ward Company went out of business in the '60's of the twentieth century.
Moore St [Now NE. 6th St.]
A view of Moore Street (now [2008] NE 6th Street) is shown here, looking east up Welcome Mountain, with the Hexagon Hotel on the left side of the street near the middle of the picture.
Mosquito Street, Looking North, Mineral Wells, Texas
Shown here is a postcard, reading "Mosquito Street [actually Mesquite Street], Looking North, Mineral Wells, Texas." Please note the Chautauqua Theater (1905-1912) at the end of the street. This picture was taken before street car tracks were installed in 1907. Also note the the absence of cars on the street--only horses and buggies.
Mountain Circulation
This booklet gives an overview of mountain circulation as it relates to aviation. According to the scope notes on the title page, it includes information to "Identify mountain circulation patterns, flight hazards, and recommended flight procedures for mountainous operations." The text also has self-evaluation questions printed throughout, with the answers printed on the last page.
[Mr. and Mrs. R.S. Dalton]
"Mr. & Mrs. R.S. Dalton on their 50th Wedding Anniversary as held in the second wooden structure of the First Baptist Church. Presiding is The Reverend Mr. Harlan Matthews." Robert (Bob) Dalton's father, Marcus L. Dalton, was killed by Indians on the Ft. Worth-Ft. Belknap military road in northeastern Palo Pinto County in 1870. Bob Dalton discovered the Dalton Oil Field on his ranch in north central Palo Pinto County, and the boom town that sprang up there was named Dalton City after him. He later moved to southwest Mineral Wells before building a large home, adorned with native rock, on 2101 NW 4th Avenue.
Mr. Lynch On His Way to Discover Mineral Wells
This picture is a photograph of a cartoon. See also "Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells" and "The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877." Please note the centipede, illustrated along with other forms of wildlife. Also, please note the Indians, who appear to be friendly. A.F. Weaver took this cartoon from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters" (q.v.) that is in the Palo Pinto County Album collection (q.v.) It is written in the nineteenth-century burlesque style, and need not be taken seriously.
[Mrs. Yokley Entertained the "Aid"]
A group of people sit and stand on the elaborately-decorated porch of a house. Written on the back are the following notes: Mrs. Yokley entertaining the "Aid." Standing - Mrs. Mollie Yokley, Mrs. John Beetham, Mrs. M. E. Paren (mother of Mrs. Bock), Mrs. M. Raines (mother of Mrs. McCracken), Mrs. Lock (a neighbor), Mrs. Veal and Nila, Mrs. J. H. McCracken. Sitting - Mrs. Provine, Mrs. Schneider, Mrs. Galbraith and Ann Lock, Mrs. Charles Harris, Mrs. G Montcastle, Mrs. W. L. Kearnes, Mrs. R. E. Bock, Mrs. Rosa Stevenson (a Dear Friend), Miss Lula Giraud (teacher and friend). Children - Bobby Provine, Edna Bock (on Pastor's lap), Drua Yokley and John C. Provine. J. W. McCall, Pastor.
[The Murphy Family]
A scene of children sitting in horse-drawn carriage, with a man leaning against the carriage house is illustrated here. A family home is shown in the background, with chickens, and a cow in the foreground. Information on back of photograph states "Looking west. Back of Murphy Home on East Mountain." Murphy was a builder in Mineral Wells with the firm of Goodrum, Murphy and Croft, Contractors. They built many of the buildings in the early part of the 1900's, including Mineral Wells High School (1915), Bimini Bath House, and the Norwood Hospital.
[The Murphy Home]
A picture taken of the Murphy home, taken about the turn of the twentieth century is shown here. The home underwent several renovations during Mr. Murphy's residency. The family at the time of this photograph consisted of two adults and three children. The home is located on East Mountain, and can be seen from most of North Oak Avenue. It was later known as the Brewer home. Mr. Murphy, a contractor, built many buildings in Mineral Wells, including the Mineral Wells High School and the second First Baptist Church.
Nazareth Hospital 25th Anniversary 1931-1956
We have here a copy of the cover of a booklet marking the 25th anniversary (1931 - 1956) of Mineral Well's Nazareth Hospital. The brochure contains pictures of the religious, medical, nursing and administrative staff, with interior scenes of departments, patients and equipment. The Mineral Wells Clinic was built soon after the current Crazy Hotel opened in 1927 to replace the Crazy Flats that burned in 1925. In 1931, the Holy Sisters of the Nazareth purchased the 46-bed facility for $135,000 and moved into the top floor of the building to live and minister to the patients. The staff began with a staff of six Sisters, one R.N., a janitor, and twelve doctors. They admitted 304 patients, of which 30% were paying patients, 23% were only partial payers, and 47% were charity cases. Eight were neonates. The staff expanded in 1939 to thirteen Sisters, (of which two were R.N.'s, and another was an anesthetist) four Graduate R.N.'s, two Nurses' Aides, a male nurse, a janitor and two handy-men. They had admitted 649 patients, of which 66 were neonates. 53 3/4% paid their way, 17% part-paid, and 29% were charity cases. The hospital ran on three 8-hour shifts twenty-fours a day and seven days a week. All hospital equipment (and the hospital linens) were used three times as long as usual, because of their expense. A Women's Auxiliary was established in 1931 to render all possible assistance to the running of the hospital--especially in defraying the cost of patients who couldn't pay their way.. The hospital was closed in the mid-sixties, and temporarily moved to the Crazy Hotel until the present [2009] hospital was built.
[NE 1st Avenue]
This photograph shows a scene of NE 1st Avenue. The stone building on the left is the "Yeager Building", which once housed the "Lion" Drugstore. At the time of the photograph, it housed Baker Medical Supply. A handwritten date on the back of the photograph states "1993." In 2007, the coffee shop "H2Jo" is located in this building. The next building up the street (and in the next block) was once the Hub Tailors, and the large three-story building farther up the street is the Western Auto Store. At the end of the street is the Old Post Office, which currently [2008] houses the Women's Club.
[Newspaper Clipping of Mineral Wells School, Texas]
A newspaper clipping with a photograph of a Mineral Wells School. This clipping had been mounted in a scrapbook, and the legible portion of the caption says, "Mineral Wells School, Texas." The whole caption read: Mineral Wells College. [sic]--A School for Both Sexes The building, which the Weatherford Democrat of September 12, 1895 says would be built in Mineral Wells (It would have been in Romanesque architecture), was to offer "Classical, Scientific, English, Music, Elocution, and Art Courses" . Professor J. McCracken was the head of the school. The building was never built, because the state provided education up to (but not including) college. A need for further education was not felt. .
[Newspaper Special - Rotary Convention, 1922]
A special "Rotary photogravure" edition for the Rotary Club Convention, Mineral Wells, that took place in 1922. The edition carries a panoramic view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain, and pictures of twenty Rotary officials and Convention Committee Chairmen. George Holmgren, District Governor (third from left), had Mineral Wells' WELCOME sign built in his San Antonio Iron Works, and donated it to the people of Mineral Wells that year.
[The North Entrance to Elmhurst Park]
The entrance to Elmhurst Park, Mineral Wells is shown here. The number "7830" in the upper left portion of the picture remains unexplained. The park was a recreational spot for the resort city. The park was closed in 1913, when trolley service was discontinued for lack of customers. As a direct result, the casino no longer exists, being also a casualty of the state's reform of gambling laws. It is now the site of the city sewage disposal facility.
North Front of Old School House
A north (side) view of the West Ward School, Mineral Wells' first High School. Built in 1902, located at 205 NW 5th Avenue, north of and on the same property as the old Rock School. The school served as both a High School and Elementary school until the East Ward School was built in 1906. When Mineral Wells High School was built in 1915, the West Ward name was changed to Houston Elementary School. It was torn down when a new Houston School was built in 1930. A note on the back of this photograph states "From Howard Album."
[North Oak Avenue ]
A street scene in Mineral Wells (looking north on Oak Avenue) approximately at the corner of North Oak Avenue and West Hubbard Street is shown here. Street car (running from 1907 to 1913) tracks are visible in the foreground, and the guy wires required to keep the power wire of the trolley in place festoon the sky. The Hexagon Hotel (opened in 1897)is visible towards the back of the picture. The Vichy (later the Beach, and then later still, the Standard) well is barely visible across from the Hexagon Hotel. The streets of Mineral Wells were not paved until 1914. Please observe the utter absence of automobiles.
[North Oak Avenue Street Scene]
A street scene of North Oak Avenue, looking north from Hubbard Street, taken about 1930, includes businesses as: Palace Drug Company, Owl Book Store, American Cafe, Poston Dry Goods, Max Miller's Shoe Store, Caldwell Hotel, Texas Power and Light, Bath House and Crazy Water Hotel. Please note that the street has been paved, and a traffic light is present.
[A North Oak Streetcar at Elmhurst Park]
A trolley car, and, presuably, passengers, are shown here at the front of entrance to Elmhurst Park. Elmhurst Park was active in the early years of the twentieth century,its career being ended by about 1940. People leaning against trolley car wear what is now [2008] considered "Vintage" clothing. One set of tracks seems to be overgrown by grass; tufts of grass also appear on the other set of tracks. No explanation has been put forward to clarify this situation.
North Oak U. S. O.
This building was erected during World War II as a USO. Many Hollywood stars performed there for the troops during the war. It is now [2009] the North Oak Community Center.
[The Norwood Hospital]
A photograph of the Norwood Hospital during its completion. Note the "Parry and Spicer Architects" sign and the "Goodrum, Murphy and Croft Contractors" sign. Dr. Norwood was the first Osteopathic doctor to set up business in Mineral Wells. He departed this life at the age of 82 in 1953. The building was donated to the Mineral Wells Historic Foundation. Plans were announced to convert the clinic to a Bed and Breakfast facility, but no progress towards such a conversion has been made to date [2007]. The legend "1863" appears on the photograph, but it is not known what it signifies. It cannot possibly be the date of the building--or of its photograph.
NW 6th Street-1906
A legend on the photograph announces: "NW 6th Street: 1906." It shows two children on donkeys and a horse and wagon. The view is west from Welcome Mountain (now East Mountain.) It appears that the old McCutcheon home (now [2008] the Gil Hull home) can be seen on the right at 612 NW 6th Street.
Oak Street, Looking North
An early view of Oak Street (now Oak Avenue), looking North is shown here. The first intersecting road is Hubbard Street. Part of the Oxford Hotel is visible on the southeast corner of Hubbard and Oak. Please note the utter lack of street lights. Street car tracks and an overhead cable run on Oak. Mineral Wells Electric System (Street Car) ceased operation in 1913. The downtown streets were paved in 1914. A hardware store, possibly Davidson's, is on the southwest corner of Hubbard and Oak.
Oak Street, Looking South
This picture shows the 100 block of what is now N. Oak Avenue, looking south. The "Palace Saloon" sign is still visible in 2008. The Palo Pinto County Courthouse Annex currently [2010] occupies the building that once housed Poston's Dry Goods (just down the street from the Palace Saloon). Please note the absence of trolley tracks--or the festoon of wires required to keep its power-line in place. The unpaved street dates the photograph prior to 1914, and probably prior to the previous picture.
Oak Street , Looking South
We have here a picture of Oak Street, looking South. The Poston Company and the Palace Saloon are easily visible in photograph. The wording "Fishburn Dallas" appears on the photograph. The unpaved street, several horses and wagons in picture date the picture to an era before 1914, when the street was paved.
Oak Street, Mineral Wells, Texas
This picture purports to show North Oak Avenue,(the photograph reads "Oak Street")of Mineral Wells, Texas,in the 100 block--looking north. The Mineral Wells Electric Railway operated from 1907 to 1913, and streets were paved in 1914. Visible are: A horse-drawn hack with passengers, a streetcar, automobiles, numerous people on sidewalks, and businesses along the street. The streetcar (Apparently working on air: The electric line required to power it is nowhere in sight)is passing the Poston Dry Goods store on its right. The Hexagon Hotel (opened December 1897)is possibly visible in the distance. A steeple is barely visible on the skyline at the left (west) side of the street.
The Oaks
The Oaks, at NW 3rd Avenue and 3rd Street, burned in 1908 along with the Presbyterian Church. The church steeple can be seen at the left. A later view of the building (with concrete sidewalks) is found on page 103 of A. F. Weaver's 1974 book, "TIME WAS In Mineral Wells", First Edition.
The Oaks
Once located at NW 3rd Avenue and 3rd Street, the Oaks met its doom in a fire that destroyed it--and the nearby Presbyterian church--in 1908. A different picture of the hotel appears in A.F. Weaver's "Time Was in Mineral Wells on page 103. The picture appears to have been excerpted from an advertising bulletin. Copy found around the negative's picture does not appear to relate directly to the hotel, but further text (that was not conserved) may have mentioned this particular hotel. A colophon in the lower right-hand corner of the photograph identifies it as the work of "Evans Photo Mineral Wells."
[Oden's Drive Inn]
This restaurant and grocery store was once located at 3403 Highway 280 east in Mineral Wells. It is no longer [2012] in existence. The photograph shows 1940's and 1950's cars parked in front. The Odens resided above the business.
The [Old] City Hall
This picture shows the old Mineral Wells City Hall at 202 N. Oak Avenue. Police, who were on foot, were summoned to the police station by a red light in the dome of the Baker Hotel before the two-way radio came into use. The City Hall was later located at 215 [Weaver's book, "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells", on page 152, says 211] S.W. 1st Avenue with Fire and Police station at 215 [the book says 212] S. Oak--east of the City Hall.
Old Elmhurst Park , Allen & Charles,1907
Two people are shown standing on the wooden bridge at Elmhust Park, Mineral Wells, in 1907. A holograph inscription on the photograph that reads "Old Elmhurst Park, Allen & Charles, 1907", probably refers to the man and boy in the picture. Elmhurst Park, a very popular recreation area during its heyday, was located in southwest Mineral Wells at the end of the streetcar line. Patrons walked from the streetcar (in the background) across the wooden bridge to the Casino and other attractions.
[An Old Home in Mineral Wells]
An old home, located in Mineral Wells, Texas, on 404 SW 3rd Street is shown here. The Baker Hotel faintly visible in the background, looking about half-way up the lowermost branch of the tree in front of the house, and looking towards the northeast.
[The Old Katie Ware Home, 911 North. Oak]
The old Katie Ware Home is also shown here. The style appears to be Queen Anne, Free Classic sub-style but it shows signs of extensive remodeling. Note the slightly unusual polygonal tower, and the front porch (which also serves as a car-port) that is level with the ground. It was located at 911 N. Oak Street. The photograph was taken taken during June of 1974.
[The Old Katie Ware Home , 911 North Oak] Avenue
The old Katie Ware Home, of Queen Anne Style, shows possible remodeling. Please note the slightly unusual octagonal tower. Also note the front porch, level with the ground. The building was located at 911 N. Oak Avenue. It has since [2008] been demolished. The picture was taken on taken June of 1974. The picture shows the home from the front.
[An Old Map of Mineral Wells]
An early cadastral map of Mineral Wells with the original street names, it also shows the unusual topography of the surrounding mountains. The streets were paved in 1914, and the street names were changed January 1,1920.
[The Old Matt Skeen Home - 516 NE 4th Avenue]
This is a picture of old Matt Skeen Home at 516 NE 4th Avenue, Mineral Wells, Texas. The porch, the face of the gable, and the differing roof lines all suggest later remodeling. Note the unusual candle-snuffer roof of the unusually-placed tower. The picture was taken June of 1974.
[The Old Post Office]
This picture shows what is now [2101] known as "The Old Post Office Building." A horse, dragging a cart, is seen drinking out of a trough in front of it. The trough is now [2010] located in the Mineral Wells Commons park. The whereabouts of horse is unknown. The building now [2010] houses the Women's club. The picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells" on page 188.
[The "Old" Post Office]
No Description Available.
On the Broadway of America Highway, Mineral Wells, Texas
The title on the Picture states, "On The Broadway Of America Highway, Mineral Wells, Texas." This picture shows a section of the Bankhead Highway, looking east where the main road to Millsap descends from the mountain on which the Mineral Wells Airport stands. Once identified as part of US Highway 281 south of town [Mineral Wells], it overlooks much of the scenery viewed from "Observation Point",at one time called one of the most scenic vistas in the state. The Bankhead Highway was America's first transcontinental highway, starting at Mile Zero on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D. C. It terminated in San Diego, California, and was named for Senator John Hollis Bankhead, head of the Good Roads Movement. It was once labeled "The Broadway of America." The road was approved by Congress in 1916, but construction was delayed by World War I. Hundreds of miles were built in the 1920's when it crossed Palo Pinto County. Mineral Wells' main streets, Hubbard Street and SE 6th Avenue were part of the Bankhead Highway. Hollis Bankhead was the grandfather of Broadway Actress, Tallulah Bankhead. His brother ran a Drugstore in Gordon, Texas, with the proud motto: "The best is none too good for our customers." The drugstore also advertised, "Everything from the cradle to the grave", selling products ranging from baby food to coffins.
One of the Residence Streets
Pictured here is a promotional brochure. The main part of the picture is a view looking west on Moore Street (now NE 6th Street). At the left (south) side of the street, in the middle distance, is the Hexagon House Hotel that was built under the supervision of David G. Galbraith. The hotel opened in 1897. To the immediate left is the Gibson Well and Drinking Pavilion. At the far corner of the Gibson property, in the middle of the street, appears to be the public drinking fountain shown in a companion picture--"Photograph of Public Mineral Water Well", q.v.--which is also included in the Weaver Collection. The fountain was apparently removed from the intersection when the "Dinky cars" began operating to Lake Pinto in 1905. The poor quality of the image is due to print screening.
The Opening of the First Season at Mineral Wells
A.F. Weaver obtained this cartoon from a jocular booklet titled "Inside Story About the Waters", now in the Palo Pinto County Album collection (q.v.). The booklet is written in the nineteenth-century burlesque tradition, and is not meant to be taken seriously. See also the cartoons "The First Well Was Dug Here in 1877" and "Mr. Lynch on His Way to Discover Mineral Wells."
[The Opening of the New Brick Highway - 1936]
A new, brick-topped highway was opened between Mineral Wells and Weatherford in 1936. In the opening ceremony, J. Pat Corrigan is identified cutting the symbolic ribbon held by Allan Wallace and W.A. Ross. The new brick highway began at [Northeast?] 9th Avenue, and extended along East Hubbard Street. Brick paving the 21-mile stretch of road was laid entirely by hand by two black men whose names, however, were never preserved for posterity.
The Original Baptist Church Building at SW 4th Avenue
Shown here is the first building, to be located at 100 SW 4th Avenue, of the First Baptist Church. The third building of that name is still at this same site. Further details about this edifice are not yet [2012] available.