Marshall Public Library - 742 Matching Results

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[African-American Woman in Harrison County]
An unidentified elderly African-American woman of Harrison County.
[African-American Woman in Harrison County]
An unidentified African-American woman in Harrison County.
[African-American Woman in Harrison County]
An unidentified woman of Marshall or Harrison County. She may be African-American.
[African-American Woman in Harrison County]
An unidentified African-American woman rests in a chair in an unknown location. She is of Marshall or Harrison County.
[African-American Woman in Harrison County]
An unidentified African-American woman of Harrison County.
[African-American Woman in Harrison County]
An unidentified African-American woman in Harrison County history.
[African-American Woman in Harrison County]
An unidentified African-American woman of Harrison County wears the hairstyle and clothing of the late nineteenth or early twentieth century.
[African-American Youth in Harrison County]
An African-American youth of Harrison County is unidentified. The picture is in the middle of text which may be from a newspaper, newsletter, or program.
[African-Americans in Harrison County]
Photograph of three unidentified African-Americans, who contributed to a local history project, posing for the camera in their home.
[Anderson Home, Marshall]
A small sign in front announces that this residence is occupied by "The Anderson's" in Marshall. The house is a two-story brick with a two-story columned portico in front. A classic door design has a small iron balcony above.
[Antioch Baptist Church in Harrison County]
Antioch Baptist Church is in the rural Leigh community of Harrison County. The location is the intersection of FM 1999 and FM 134. It was formally organized in 1866 by an African-American congregation. It began as a brush arbor. The first church, built in the 1880's, burned. The second building replaced it in 1921. This red brick building has air conditioning units enclosed in fencing on each side. The front gabled roof has a small gable above the entrance.
[Apartment Complex, Marshall]
The Bel-Air Housing Complex in Marshall.
[Art Prints at the Public Library]
An art collection was on display at Marshall Public Library, date unknown. The works all have a western theme. Also visible are the library's card catalog at left, storage cabinets at right, and a reading table with red chairs in the foreground. The presence of a card catalog dates the display event between 1973-1990.
[Art Prints at the Public Library]
When Marshall Public Library was established in 1973, wall cabinets provided storage and display space for a circulating art print collection.
[Art Works]
Several art works hang on display. The identity and location of the works are unknown.
[Audio Recordings File at the Public Library]
Marshall Public Library stored the LP (long-playing) recordings in their own files which were made for the purpose. This type of audio recording existed for a substantial part of the 20th century, and was current when the library was built in 1973.
[Author Signs Books at Marshall Public Library]
A visiting author, unidentified, autographs his books at Marshall Public Library after speaking to an interested group about his writing.
[Author Visits Marshall Public Library]
This author visited Marshall Public Library to talk about his books. He followed with a signing. He is unidentified.
[Barber and Beauty School]
Valerie Hurd's Barber and Beauty School, located at 304 Noland St. in Marshall, Texas, was a long-time business, c1955-c2001. It was first located on Park School St. and relocated to this address c1959. The building burned about 2001. This picture may date from early 1960's.
[Belaire Manor Apartments, Marshall]
Belaire Manor Apartments is a complex located at 1400 A Julie in west Marshall. Two buildings are shown.
[Bethesda Baptist Church, Marshall]
An old photograph, date unknown but likely prior to 1897, depicts Bethesda Baptist Church of Marshall. Originally known as "Colored Baptist Church," the members renamed it about 1887 and then added the word "Missionary" during the 1980's to make the official name "Bethesda Missionary Baptist Church." Bethesda is one of the oldest African-American congregations in Harrison County, being founded in 1867 by 450 souls led by Rev. William Massey with the assistance of Rev. A. E. Clemmons, the pastor of the white First Baptist Church. The members met in Rev. Massey's home at 601 Massey St. until the construction of this one-story wooden structure, probably between 1867 and 1875. The plan included a veranda leading to the vestibule, three aisles, and colored glass in the arched Gothic windows. There was an organ, the first in Marshall, and a belfry. Outside facilities included a baptistry and a well. During 1897-1901, this structure was razed and replaced by a larger brick structure of Gothic style which later burned and was itself replaced. However the front facade of the wooden structure was incorporated into the new buildings as a link with the past. The site at 801 W. Grand (Hwy 80) has been owned continuously by this congregation since the deed was acquired in 1867. It is now listed on the "Buard History Trail" as a site significant to Marshall's African-American heritage.
[Bethesda Missionary Baptist Church]
Photograph of the southeast corner of the Bethesda Missionary Baptist Church. There are two people in a field, and a person standing on the stoops.
[Bethesda Missionary Baptist Church, Marshall]
Bethesda Missionary Baptist Church is located at 801 W. Grand Ave. (Hwy 80) in Marshall. A historic African-American congregation, it was founded in 1867 at a time when many newly-emancipated blacks were leaving white churches to establish their own. 450 members founded the first congregation, led by Rev. William Massey, a black religious leader, with the assistance of Rev. A. E. Clemmons, pastor of the white First Baptist Church. The first meetings were held in Rev. Massey's house until the first dedicated building, a one-story wooden structure, was erected at the present location. That structure has an entry in the Texas History Portal. It served until the period 1897-1901, when it was razed and replaced with an enlarged brick building of Gothic style. That one burned in 1953 and was replaced with the nearly identical building which is shown at left. The facade faces south and contains the old wooden facade as a link with the past. In the beginning, the congregation was known simply as "Colored Baptist Church," which was the name on the deed. Later the members changed the name to identify with the healing pool of Bethesda in Biblical Jerusalem. During the 1980's the word "Missionary" was added to reflect denominational affiliation. Throughout its history, the congregation has nurtured pastors and members noted not only in Marshall but also far beyond her borders. A founding member was David Abner, the Harrison County treasurer, House of Representatives member in the Fourteenth Legislature, and delegate to the 1875 Constitutional Convention. Another was Andrew Gross, father of Frederick Gross who became a president of Houston College. Bethesda was also involved in the founding of Bishop College, the black Baptist institution that was located in Marshall from 1881-1961. In 2008 Bethesda was added to the "Buard History Trail" which recognizes historic ...
[Bethesda Missionary Baptist Church, Marshall]
Bethesda Missionary Baptist Church is a historic African-American congregation. It is located at 801 W. Grand Ave (Hwy 80) in Marshall. The church was established in 1867, making it one of the oldest surviving congregations in Harrison County. It was founded by Rev. A. E. Clemmons, pastor of the white First Baptist Church, and Rev. William Massey, a black religious leader who led 450 persons to form the congregation. Throughout its history, Bethesda's membership has included pastors and members notable not only in Marshall but far beyond. Among the founders was David Abner, who was Harrison County treasurer, state legislator, and delegate to the 1875 Constitutional Convention. Another was Andrew Gross, father of Frederick Gross who became president of Houston College. The congregation also had a leading role in the founding of Bishop College, which was an African-American Baptist institution located in Marshall from 1881-1961. In its beginning the congregation was known simply as "Colored Baptist Church," the name on the deed. When the name was changed, the members chose "Bethesda" to identify with the healing pool of Biblical Jerusalem. During the 1980's, the word "Missionary" was added to reflect denominational affiliation. Bethesda's first dedicated church building was a one-story wooden structure constructed at the present location. A picture of it can be seen in the portal. During 1897-1901, the wooden building was razed for construction of a larger Gothic-style brick building. That one burned in 1953 and was replaced by the nearly identical structure shown in the picture at left. However the original wood facade was retained within the brick facades of both later buildings, creating a physical link with the past. Another link with the past was renewed during the 1980's, when Bethesda began to join with First Baptist Church for occasional worship services and fellowships. Recently the ...
[Bethesda Missionary Baptist Church, Marshall]
Bethesda Missionary Baptist Church, located at 801 W. Grand Ave. in Marshall, is one of the oldest African-American congregations in the county. It was established in 1867 during the Reconstruction period when so many newly-emancipated blacks left white churches to establish their own. Originally the name was simply the "Colored Baptist Church," which was the name on the deed. When the members elected to change the name, they identified it with the healing pool of Bethesda in Biblical Jerusalem. The word "Missionary" was added to its name in the mid-1980's to reflect denominational affiliation. In 1987 Bethesda began to join with the First Baptist Church in occasional worship services and fellowship. The two churches are historically linked because Rev. A. E. Clemmons, a pastor of the white First Baptist Church, and Rev. William Massey, a black religious leader, jointly led 450 souls in the founding of Bethesda. Massey went on to pastor other churches in Waco and Austin but later returned. Other prominent founders were David Abner, who was Harrison County treasurer, a member of the Texas House of Representatives in the Fourteenth Legislature, and a delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1875; and Andrew Gross, whose son Frederick became a president of Houston College. Throughout its history, the congregation has included pastors and members of prominence not only in Marshall but far beyond. The congregation also had a historic role in the founding of Bishop College, the African-American Baptist institution that was located in Marshall 1881-1961. Bethesda's first dedicated church building was a one-story wooden structure located on the present site. It has an entry in the Texas History Portal. It was razed during 1897-1901 to be replaced by a larger brick edifice of Gothic style. That building burned in 1953 and was replaced by the nearly identical structure ...
[Bill Moyers Address]
Bill Moyers, broadcast journalist and former aide to President Lyndon B. Johnson, addresses a gathering in the Gold Auditorium at Marshall Public Library, date unknown.
[Bill Moyers, Journalist]
Bill Moyers, journalist, speaks at a benefit for the Marshall Public Library during the 1976 bicentennial. Moyers was raised in Marshall, Texas. He occasionally returns to speak and support various issues or events that are significant to him.
[Bill Moyers Promotes Libraries]
Bill Moyers, national journalist, was raised in Marshall. During the 1976 Bicentennial celebrations, he returned to Marshall to speak about the value of libraries.
[Birmingham Department Store, Marshall]
Birmingham Department Store in Marshall was located at 205-207 and 213 N. Wellington Street from 1967 or 1968 to 2001 or 2002, according to city directories. The picture is from the 1970's. Other businesses are located there now. The store was owned by Samuel A. (Sam) Birmingham and his wife Jean, a school teacher and administrator. Both Birminghams were also civic leaders. Sam Birmingham was Marshall's first African-American mayor. Mrs. Birmingham served on the city commission after her retirement.
[Bishop College 1926 Yearbook Page]
A page from the 1926 yearbook of Bishop College shows an unidentified man and woman. At that time, Bishop College was located in Marshall.
[Bishop College 1926 Yearbook Page]
A page from the 1926 Bishop College yearbook pictures a young female student in the Academic Department. That department taught grades lower than college to younger students. Bishop College was located in Marshall at that time.
[Bishop College Chapel Interior]
This old photograph shows the interior of the chapel at Bishop College in Marshall. Bishop College was founded in 1881 and chartered in 1885. It was owned and operated by the American Baptist Home Mission Society of New York City. Named after Nathan Bishop, corresponding secretary of the Society, the college's purpose was to train African-American teachers and preachers for the development of Christian leadership. The institution originally included a grammar school, a high school, college preparatory courses, an industrial school, and a four-year standard college course leading to the Bachelor degree. Later the college phased out the lower grades. In 1961 the campus moved to Dallas. After financial difficulties, the college closed in 1988. None of the original buildings in Marshall remain.
[Bishop College Chapel, Marshall]
This building was erected to be a temporary chapel for Bishop College when the campus was located in Marshall. Bishop was a historic Baptist college for African-American students that was established in 1881. In 1961 the campus relocated to Dallas. Falling upon hard times, Bishop closed in 1988. None of the original Marshall campus remains.
[Bishop College Classroom Building, Marshall]
This was a temporary classroom building in the early years of Bishop College in Marshall. The college was established as a Baptist institution for African-Americans in 1881. The campus relocated to Dallas in 1961. Bishop closed in 1988. None of the original Marshall campus remains.
[Bishop College Dormitory, Marshall]
Marston Hall, located on the historic Bishop College campus in Marshall, was a dormitory for college men. It was built between 1909 and 1915 on the site of an older dormitory, also called Marston Hall. The campus buildings no longer exist. Bishop was established in 1881 as a Baptist college for African-Americans. In 1961 the campus relocated to Dallas. Eventually Bishop fell upon hard times and closed in 1988. The large building at right shows the entrance toward the campus. A reservoir surrounded by planting beds is at center. To the left is a small bell tower. In the distance is a small frame building used as a schoolroom.
[Bishop College Dormitory, Marshall]
Bishop Hall was a women's dormitory at Bishop College in Marshall. A historic Black college that was established in 1881, it relocated to Dallas in 1961, eventually fell upon hard times, and closed in 1988. During the institution's life, Bishop educated men and women who became citizens of note in the professions of education, religion, law, and medicine.
[Bishop College Dormitory, Marshall]
Rockefeller Hall was a women's dormitory at Bishop College when it was located in Marshall. Bishop College was a Baptist school for Black students that was established in 1881. In 1961 it relocated to Dallas, eventually fell upon hard times and closed in 1988; but during its time in Marshall, the college educated many men and women who became citizens of note in the professions of education, religion, law, and medicine.
[Bishop College School Song]
This is a partial copy of the lyrics for "Bishop Blue," the Bishop College school song. Bishop College was founded in Marshall in 1881. It educated many African-American students before relocating to Dallas in 1961. In 1988 the school closed.
[Bishop College Student]
The unidentified young lady in the Bishop College 1926 yearbook was in the Academic Department. That department educated the lower grades below college level.
[Bishop College Teachers' Cottage, Marshall]
A bungalow at Bishop College, Marshall, provided housing for instructors in the early years of the school's history. A historic Baptist college for African-Americans, Bishop was established in 1881. In 1961 it was relocated to Dallas. Falling upon hard times, the college closed in 1988. None of the original buildings of the Marshall campus remain.
[Bishop College Yearbook Page]
A page from the 1926 Bishop College yearbook shows a female student in the Academic Department, which taught grades below college level.
[BishopCollege Dormitory, Marshall]
Marston Hall, located on the historic Bishop College campus in Marshall, was a dormitory for college men. It was built between 1909 and 1915 on the site of an older dormitory, also called Marston Hall. The campus no longer exists. It was a Baptist college for African-Americans. In the picture, a reservoir is in the foreground. To the left of the building is a small bell tower.
[Board Room at Marshall Public Library]
The board room at Marshall Public Library is used for the Board of Library Trustees meeting and other small group meetings. A plaque on the wall honors library benefactors.
[Booker T. Washington School in Marshall]
Booker T. Washington Elementary School in Marshall is located at 1202 Evans St in the northwest part of the city. When it opened on Jan. 26, 1959, it was to serve African-American children in grades one through seven who would be transferred from four county schools. In the very next academic year, the school was reorganized to house grades one through three. Another merger occurred two years later when a small school in the community of Woodlawn sent its students. During the late 1960s, Washington was a kindergarten and special education center. From 1978 to 1989, it housed an alternative school, the district health and food services, and other special programs. In 1989 four rooms were added for the school's reorganization as Washington Early Childhood Education Center for prekindergarten and kindergarten children. A 1992 expansion included a multi-purpose room. In 1999, WECC became a Head Start campus, although it retained all district prekindergarten students. In 2002 another expansion added eight classrooms and a library. Now the school houses all of the district's Head Start students while continuing services to all prekindergarten children.
[Books for Pre-Readers at the Library]
One half of the children's area at Marshall Public Library features picture books and colorful characters on low shelves that the smallest patron can browse.
[Boston A. Russell, Marshall Educator]
The Pemberton High School yearbook photograph of band director Boston A. Russell. The yearbook date may be from 1950-53 or 1964. No information is available about Mr. Russell.
[Boy Races at the Games Day]
An unidentified young boy races across the grass at a picnic and games day which concluded the summer reading program at Marshall Public Library, c1976.
[Buard's Phillips 66 Service Station in Marshall]
Buard's Phillips 66 Service Station in Marshall was located at 1301 University where it intersects with Sanford Street. Therefore it was located within the historic "New Town Neighborhood," which is an African-American community of homes, businesses, professional offices, schools, and churches grouped around the Wiley College campus. The owner of the station, Polete Buard, was a self-made businessman. He was born and educated in Marshall. In 1929 he married Rebecca Drayden, whose biography is in the Texas History Portal. Buard first worked for the Texas and Pacific Railroad in the freight office. After retiring in 1970, he began operation of this service station, which he had purchased earlier. He was also active in his church and the Masonic Lodge.
[Building in Marshall]
An unidentified brick building in Marshall. There are three exterior doors on the ground floor with large windows on either side. Three windows on the upper floor align with the doors. Larger windows are on each end. The building sits alone on a low rise, with steps leading through a lawn to the front entrance.
[Building in Marshall]
Unidentified building in Marshall.