Marshall Public Library - 742 Matching Results

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[Rambo Funeral Home in Marshall]

Description: Rambo Funeral Home in Marshall has been serving the African-American community for decades. It is located at 622 S. Carter St., an address which places it in the "New Town Neighborhood" of west Marshall. New Town is a cluster of residences, businesses, professional offices, schools, and churches which developed by 1930 around Wiley College. It is currently of interest as a historical area to be preserved for local African-American history.
Date: unknown

[Central High School, Marshall]

Description: Central High School was located on a hill at the conjunction of Railroad Ave. (now Alamo), Border St. (now Travis), and Fannin St in Marshall. It was built by Prof. H. B. Pemberton, using his own funds which were repaid by donations. It was the first public school for African-Americans in the city. In the beginning all grade levels were there. When elementary schools were built, those grades moved and Central became a high school. Later the high school moved to a new campus on Wiley Ave. (Rosborough Springs Rd.) The old building was torn down and the hill leveled. Today a historic marker stands on the site.
Date: unknown

[Potters Creek Cemetery, Harrison County]

Description: Potters Creek Cemetery is located in Harrison County. It is on the south side of Hwy 449 (Hynson Springs Rd.) across from Potters Creek Church. This is east of the village of Hallsville near Bailey Cutoff. As shown in the picture, one travels about 100 yards down a lane with a big gate. A vehicle, possibly a hearse, is in the lane with an unidentified man standing nearby. The roof of a structure is visible in the distance. No graves appear in the picture. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. According to its catalog, the oldest death date is 1883. The cemetery is still used and maintained.
Date: unknown

[Building in Marshall]

Description: An unidentified brick building in Marshall. There are three exterior doors on the ground floor with large windows on either side. Three windows on the upper floor align with the doors. Larger windows are on each end. The building sits alone on a low rise, with steps leading through a lawn to the front entrance.
Date: unknown

[St. John Baptist Church in Harrison County]

Description: St. John Baptist Church is located on Blocker Rd., seven miles southeast of Marshall in rural Harrison County. It is a traditionally African-American congregation. Founded in 1869, the present sanctuary was built in 1960. A two-story red brick structure, it has a front-facing gable with a smaller gable over the entrance. Broad steps lead to the arched opening.
Date: unknown

[President's Home at Bishop College, Marshall]

Description: The president's home at Bishop College in Marshall was formerly an antebellum plantation mansion called Wyalucing, located on a hilltop at the western end of Burleson Street. Constructed c1850, it was the home of the Holcombe family that moved to Marshall from Tennessee. A daughter, Lucy Petway Holcombe (1832-1899), married Col. Francis Wilkinson Pickens in the house. A lawyer and secessionist, he first became United States Ambassador to Russia and later the Confederate governor of South Carolina. Also a staunch supportor of the Southern cause, Mrs. Pickens was called "Lady Lucy, Queen of the Confederacy." Her likeness appears on certain Confederate currency, the only woman's image to do so. A historic marker at the corner of Hwy 80 and Bishop St. recognizes her. Wyalucing became the original building and centerpiece of Bishop College, which was established in 1881. Bishop relocated to Dallas in 1961. The house was razed during the 1970's to make way for a federal housing project.
Date: unknown

[Business in Marshall]

Description: The Record Hut is the sign on this business in Marshall. The address is 512 1/2 S. Carter St. The location is within the New Town Neighborhood, which is a historic African-American community in west Marshall. The building is a small flat-roofed concrete block structure with grilles over the doors and an ice machine outside. The sign also has the words, "Tapes" and "Head Shop." A name on the sign is almost obscured by glare, but appears to be J. W. Fry.
Date: unknown

[George Foreman, Harrison County Celebrity]

Description: In this March 7, 1978 interview, George Foreman announced his return to the boxing ring just eleven days before the first anniversary of his retirement. The ex-heavyweight champion previously boxed with Jimmy Young in Puerto Rico. Following that fight, Foreman experienced a religious conversion which prompted his retirement. He declared that he felt led to return to the ring as a witness to his beliefs. 29 years old at the time of this interview, George Foreman has maintained a ranch south of Marshall in Harrison County for many years. The ranch has training facilities which he used to prepare for several bouts.
Date: unknown

[Cemetery in Harrison County]

Description: An unidentified cemetery in Harrison County. It is known to be a traditionally African-American site. A cyclone fence is in the foreground. Rows of slabs are decorated with flowers and plants. Headstones can be seen in the distance. The cemetery appears to be neatly trimmed and has mature trees to create a park-like setting.
Date: unknown