Marshall Public Library - Browse

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[Cemetery in Harrison County]

Description: An unidentified cemetery in Harrison County. It is known to be a traditionally African-American site. A cyclone fence is in the foreground. Rows of slabs are decorated with flowers and plants. Headstones can be seen in the distance. The cemetery appears to be neatly trimmed and has mature trees to create a park-like setting.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[Marshall University, Marshall]

Description: Marshall University was one of Marshall's earliest schools. It was authorized by Sam Houston in 1842. In 1843 Peter Whetstone, founder of Marshall, gave ten acres of land for educational purposes. The plot is located on the corner of W. Houston and College St., where Marshall Junior High School stands today. The building shown in the picture was contracted in 1851. It served the community until 1910, when it closed its doors. The school was never a true university. It served educational needs of more youthful boys and girls. A historical marker on the campus recognizes the school's history and contributions.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[Business in Marshall]

Description: The "End Zone" was a business in Marshall, location unknown. It was a small one-story building that stood alone on the lot. It had two entrance doors and large windows. On a boarded window are the words, "Private for Members Only Guests Welcome." A picture is attached to another boarded window.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[Carnegie Library at Wiley College, Marshall]

Description: The Carnegie Library in Marshall was located at Wiley College. It was built with a $15,000 grant obtained in 1907 by Dr. M. W. Dogan, a president of the college. In 1967 it was replaced by a more modern library. An interior view shows the reading area and stacks. The building has been preserved and is now the Wiley College Administration building.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[Marietta B. Nelson, Marshall Educator]

Description: Mrs. Marietta B. Nelson taught typing and shorthand courses at Pemberton High School in Marshall. Pemberton, which was eventually merged with Marshall High School, was an African-American school before integration.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[Jerusalem Baptist Church]

Description: Jerusalem Baptist Church is located at 1300 Billups St. in Marshall. It is within the historic New Town Neighborhood in the western section of the city. It is a traditionally African-American congregation. In 1874 when the church was established, the area was known as Hubbard's Hill. The present sanctuary was constructed in 1948. Of red brick, the central tower above the entrance has the words, "God Is Love."
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[Greater Rock Spring Baptist Church, Harrison County]

Description: There are two Rock Spring Baptist churches in Harrison County. This one is the Greater Rock Spring Baptist Church No 2, located on Hwy 43 ten miles southwest of Marshall. Originally the site was by the Rock Springs Cemetery. The date of the move to the present site is unknown. The church shown is a white frame building with a bell tower or cupola. The front entrance is covered by a gabled porch. A sign stands near the window at right. The history relates that this was originally a Methodist church for white people; but they turned it over to a black congregation in 1871. The two white men who took part were Parson Carter and Parson William Russell. The first pastor after the transfer was Parson William Townson. The building shown was erected between 1931 and 1951, when the "Father of the Church," Rev. J. J. Jones, was pastor. Physical improvements have been added twice. During the second remodeling, 1975-1978, the word "Greater" was added to the church's name so that it has been known as "Greater Rock Spring Baptist Church No. 2" since that time.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[Marshall Grave in Harrison County]

Description: Grave of a man and woman named Marshall in a Harrison County cemetery, unidentified. The words "Mother" and "Father" are visible. The father's name is Tom M. The mother's name is Dennie or Gennie. Other words and dates are illegible.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[Huey P. May, Human Resources Developer]

Description: Huey P. May of Dallas was interviewed by Julia Scott Reed for her "Open Line" column published on February 5, 1978 in the Dallas Morning News. May was acknowleged for his appointment to the board of directors of the local American Society for Training and Development. He was the first African-American member of the organization, and the first minority on its board. At the time of the interview, he was employed by the City of Dallas as an assistant in the personnel training division. He provided courses for some 12,000 city employees. Before working for Dallas, he developed training programs for DuPont, U.S. Steel, Chevron Chemical Corp., Northrup, and Texas Instruments. May received his Bachelor degree from Bishop College and a Master degree from the University of Texas at Arlington. His work in human resources was recognized by the National Alliance of Businessmen and the American Business Women's Association.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[Dr. O. L. Bledsoe, Marshall Physician]

Description: Dr. Ovid L. Bledsoe of Marshall is featured in this clipping from a newspaper, newsletter, or program. A physician, he practiced medicine in Marshall for 33 years. The Bledsoe name is prominent in local African-American history. The doctor was born between 1886 and 1888 to Rev. W. F. Bledsoe, a minister and successful businessman in Marshall. The young Ovid graduated from Bishop College in 1908 and then from Meharry Medical College in 1912. He returned to Marshall to practice the rest of his life. His office was located on the Northwest Public Square. He also joined with Dr. G. T. Coleman and Dr. F. E. Williams to establish a clinic on Sanford Street. He married Letta Carey, who taught at Bishop College, in 1917. They were parents of two children Zeta and Ovid L., Jr. The family home was at 703 W. Grand Ave. Letta died in 1931, and in 1943 the doctor married Mary Elizabeth Watson, the librarian at Bishop College. The entire Bledsoe family was active in church and civic affairs; but most particularly they supported Bishop College. Dr. O. L. Bledsoe died February 21, 1945.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[Youth in Uniform, Marshall]

Description: A group of youth are in uniforms that are like an early band style in this Marshall photo. They are accompanied by an adult man. The group's purpose and activity are unidentified.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[Miles Memorial CME Church, Marshall]

Description: Miles Memorial CME Church is located in Marshall. It is a traditionally Africa-Americna congregation. In the picture, a group of children with four adult women are gathered before the front doors of the church. The event and members of the group are unidentified.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[Woman in Marshall]

Description: An unidentified woman from Marshall stands in a curtained doorway. She wears a heavily printed or decorated gown. Her hair is a period style and she wears gold-rimmed glasses. Behind her is a paneled wall and a wicker object.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[Former Church in Marshall]

Description: This church was located at the corner of Garrett and Johnson streets in Marshall. The sign at the corner of the white frame building reads, "Marshall C.O.G.I.C Pastor__McLane." This Church of God in Christ served a traditionally African-American congregation. It has been torn down.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[St. John Church Gathering, Harrison County]

Description: A group of children and adults are gathered in front of St. John Baptist Church. It is located on Blocker Rd. in rural Harrison County. The congregation is traditionally African-American. The group and event are unidentified.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph

[Sheppard-Watts Hospital and Nursing School in Marshall]

Description: A three-story brick building was the Sheppard- Watts Hospital and Nursing School which served the African-American community in Marshall. It was located at 606 S. Carter St. in the historic New Town Neighborhood. The hospital was constructed in 1925 by Dr. James R. Sheppard. It was later purchased and renovated by Dr. William Watts. On the Sanborn Maps, the original hospital was called Sheppard Sanitarium.
Date: unknown
Item Type: Photograph