Marshall Public Library - 742 Matching Results

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[Class Meets at Library]
A career education class meets in the Gold Auditorium at Marshall Public Library. The auditorium was equipped with the latest audio-visual technology when the library was built in 1973. This class, meeting in 1978, made use of that technology shown in the picture. The auditorium has been in demand almost continuously for many purposes since the library was built.
[Claudia Alta (Lady Bird) Taylor Johnson, First Lady]
Mrs. Lady Bird Johnson, former First Lady, wife of President Lyndon Johnson, and Texan noted for her devotion to wildflowers. She passed away on July 11, 2007. She was a native of Harrison County.
[Claudia (Lady Bird) Johnson]
Mrs. Lady Bird Johnson, First Lady and native of Harrison County.
[Club Women in Marshall]
Club women are recognized in this newspaper photo. The women are not identified.
[Club Women in Marshall]
A group of club women are recognized by this newspaper photograph. None are identified.
[Club Women in Marshall]
Marshall club women are recognized in this newspaper photo. The event and the women are not identified.
[Clyde and Mrs. Kilpatrick, Library Supporters]
Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Kilpatrick were the first in Harrison County to get memberships in the newly formed Friends of Marshall Public Library. The membership drive was the beginning of community support for building a new library in marshall.
[Coliseum, Rome]
The Roman Coliseum is pictured in the travel from a collection in Harrison County. The source and date are unknown. Some tourists are visible in the foreground.
[Collage of Photographs, Marshall]
A collage of photographs and other memorabilia decorates a wall in an African-American home. The photos and their location are unidentified.
[College Faculty, Marshall]
This page came from a yearbook, either Bishop College or Wiley College in Marshall. The words designate that photos are of college faculty. The teachers and the name "Haggard" are unidentified.
[Community Leader]
An unidentified man was recognized in this Marshall newspaper article.
[Community Leader and Educator, Marshall]
An unidentified African-American educator is photographed in his office in Marshall. The telephone, other furnishings, and his clothing suggest a time during the first part of the twentieth century.
[Community Leader and Library Supporter]
A man, unidentified, was a Marshall Public Library supporter and community leader.
[Continental Trailways Depot, Marshall]
The Continental Trailways Bus Line served Marshall from the mid-1950s through the late 1980s, when the franchise passed to the Greyhound Bus Company. The depot was built during the mid 1960s.
[Continental Trailways Depot, Marshall]
Continental Trailways gave intercity bus service to Marshall from the mid-1950s until the late 1980s, when the franchise passed into the ownership of Greyhound Bus Lines. This depot, built during the mid-1960s, is located at 201 S. Bolivar Street in the downtown area. The picture likely dates from that time.
[Continental Trailways Depot, Marshall]
Photograph of the front and side of the one-story "Continental Trailways" building in Marshall, Texas.
[Continental Trailways in Marshall]
Continental Trailways bus station was located at 201 S. Bolivar St. in downtown Marshall. It is now owned by Greyhound Lines Inc.
[Continental Trailways in Marshall]
The bus station at 201 S. Bolivar St. near downtown Marshall was once owned by the Continental Trailways Bus Company. It is now owned by Greyhound Lines Inc.
[Corinth Baptist Church, Harrison County]
Corinth Baptist Church is in Harrison County.
[Cottage in New Town Neighborhood, Marshall, Texas]
The New Town neighborhood in Marshall, Texas was a self-sufficient African-American community containing schools, stores, churches, a college, and many bungalows and cottages. This cottage is typical of the neighborhood. New Town has been selected as a model for preservation under Marshall's Historic Preservation Action Plan.
[Crafts Class]
Unidentified African-American students in a crafts class display their handiwork.
[Dave Beachum]
An African-American man in Harrison County, Dave Beachum. He was an educator in the Marshall area. Mr. Beachum was married to Emmaline Leffall. She was the daughter of Calvin and Mariah Leffall (former slaves who settled in Elysian Fields slightly outside of Marshall). The Leffall family has been in the Marshall area since the late 1870's
[Decorating a Grave in Harrison County]
Photograph of an unidentified woman placeing flowers at the headstone for two graves in a Harrison County cemetery. In the center background there appears to be a small structure.
[Display at Marshall Public Library]
A display area at Marshall Public Library, Marshall, has an art print which could be circulated; and a violin which was used by local musician Charles R. Aber. Mr. Aber also had a large collection of audio tapes which his mother donated to the library after his death.
[Donation to Library]
Many individuals and groups donated to the building fund for the new Marshall Public Library from 1969-1973. In this newspaper photo, Tommy Thomas of a local veterans group presents a check to a member (unidentified) of the Friends of a Public Library, which spearheaded the movement for the library.
[Donation Toward a New Public Library]
During the early 1970's, various organisations contributed toward the building of a new public library in Marshall, Texas. In this newspaper photo, Fenn Lewis, fund drive chairman, accepts a donation from Johnny Barkett.
[Donation Toward New Library]
Martin Spangler, chairman of the drive to build a new Marshall Public Library, accepts a check from Glenda Liston. Almost every club and organization in Marshall, Texas contributed to this fund drive.
[Donor Presents Gift to New Library]
A man and a woman, both unidentified, were instrumental in donating a gift toward the building of the new Marshall Public Library, which was completed in 1973.
[Dorothy Morrison, First Director of Marshall Public Library]
An early library logo depects Mrs. Dorothy Morrison, first director of Marshall Public Library, 1970-1984.
[Dorothy Morrison, First Director of the Marshall Public Library]
Mrs. Dorothy Morrison was director of the new Marshall Public Library from 1970 to 1984. She was responsible for several innovations at the library. The newspaper-on-microfilm collection is named in her memory.
[Dorothy Vance Montgomery]
Dorothy Vance Montgomery, musician and educator in Marshall, Texas. Born and reared in Marshall, she received several undergraduate and graduate degrees from Wiley College and the University of Southern California. She taught music in the Marshall Public Schools, 1930-1976. She also taught piano for 44 years at her private studio; was minister of music for 17 years at New Bethel Baptist Church; and was adjunct teacher for 2 years at Wiley College. The image shows her receiving one of several local awards for her long contribution to education.
[Downtown Marshall]
A view of N. Washington Street (center) at the intersections with E. Houston (foreground) and W. Austin (left center) streets in Marshall during the mid-1960s. At the time of the picture, N. Washington was the commercial center or "main street" of the city. Together with W. Austin street, they form the northeast corner of the square where the historic county courthouse is located. The First National Bank is shown at the extreme right in the picture; it fronts on E. Houston. Across N. Washington where it intersects with W. Austin, Pelz Jewelry has a corner entrance. Continuing to the left on W. Austin are Security Finance Corp., Bert Jackson Jeweler, and Sharkey Tailoring. Looking down the west side of N. Washington past Pelz Jewelry are Matthewson Drug Co., McLellan Store, and the historic J. Weisman & Co. department store. Other stores are too distant to be identified.
[Downtown Street Scene, Marshall]
As the sign attests, N. Wellington Street runs one way to the south in Marshall. The street intersects with Houston (right foreground) after crossing W. Austin Street one block to the north. Businesses located along the section of N. Wellington shown in the picture would have included the Marshall National Bank motor branch, Birmingham Shopping Mart, Paxtons Appliances, Blairs TV Service, River's Seed Bin, McKay's Furniture Co., City Finance So., and Denney Cleaners. Along W. Austin Street right to left, were Marshall Barber Shop, Mays Studio, the Blalock Building, Joe Woods Radio & TV Service, Stacy Shoe Repair, Blue Bonnet Beauty Shop, Desota Imports-Exports, Austin Furniture Co., McGibbon Watch Repairing, Barkett Shoe Repairing, Parish Taxi Stand, and finally Marshall Public Library at the extreme left side of the picture. The picture likely dates from 1978 or later. The blue Oldsmobile vehicle on the left is a 1978 model.
[Downtown Street Scene, Marshall]
Marshall's N. Wellington Street (center) intersects with Houston (foreground), then crosses W. Austin Street on its way north. Businesses shown on N. Wellington during the late 1960s included Tip Top Cleaners, Blair's TV Service, Marshall National Bank Motor Branch, Rives Seed Bin, McKay's Furniture Co., City Finance Co., and Denney Cleaners. From right to left on W. Austin, one can see Marshall Barber Shop, Mays Studio, Blue Bonnet Beauty Shop, Joe Woods Radio & TV Service and Stacy Shoe Repair Shop.
[Dr. A. F. Veau, Marshall Public Library Supporter]
Dr. A. F. Veau was a member of the executive board of the Friends of a Public Library in Marshall, Texas. In 1978 he was installed as the president of the Friends group. He had also been active in promoting the new library building, which opened in 1973. For many years he kept scrapbooks that detailed the history of the establishment and progress of the library as well as the Friends.
[Dr. Bill Burns and Friend]
Dr. Bill Burns discusses matters with an unidentified man.
[Dr. C. W. Kerry, Marshall]
Dr. C. W. Kerry was featured in this newsletter or program. He came to Marshall to address a Pemberton group. The date and other identification are unknown.
[Dr. Ernest S. Rambo, Community Leader]
Dr. Ernest S. Rambo was featured in this article from the Marshall News Messenger newspaper.
[Dr. Everett H. Leach, Harrison County Physician]
Dr. Everett H. Leach, early African-American physician, was born in Marshall in 1879 or 1881 (tombstone date). He entered Bishop College at age twelve. He received his medical degree from Flynt Medical College in New Orleans. Later he studied at Illinois Post-Graduate School in Chicago. He settled in the rural Leigh community east of Marshall, where he built a practice, erected a drug store and office, and owned two farms. Later he moved to Marshall and commuted to Leigh by automobile. According to his tombstone, he died March 31, 1946, and was buried in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997, Marshall.
[Dr. Everett H. Leach, Harrison County Physician]
Dr. Everett H. Leach, African-American physician, was born in Marshall in 1879 or 1881 (tombstone date). He entered Bishop College at age twelve. He received his medical degree from Flynt Medical College in New Orleans. Later he studied at Illinois Post-Graduate School in Chicago. He settled in the rural Leigh community east of Marshall, where he built a practice, erected a drug store and office, and owned two farms. Later he moved to Marshall and commuted to Leigh by automobile. According to his tombstone, he died March 31, 1946. He was interred in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in north Marshall.
[Dr. Everett H. Leach, Harrison County Physician]
Dr. Everett H. Leach, African-American physician, was born in Marshall in 1879 or 1881 (tombstone date). He entered Bishop College at age twelve. He received his medical degree from Flynt Medical College in New Orleans. Later he studied at Illinois Post-Graduate School in Chicago. He settled in the rural Leigh community east of Marshall, where he built a practice, erected a drug store and office, and owned two farms. Later he moved to Marshall and commuted to Leigh by automobile. According to his tombstone, he died March 31, 1946. He was buried in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in north Marshall.
[Dr. G. T. Coleman Home in Marshall]
This bungalow in Marshall, possibly Craftsman in its original form, has several later additions. It is located at 606 Sanford Street in the "New Town Neighborhood," a historic African-American community that developed around Wiley College from 1910-1950. The home was the residence of Dr. George T. Coleman. The physician also had a structure across the street at 607 Sanford that he used as a hospital for his patients. Some of his patients went to the Sheppard-Watts Sanitarium on S. Carter Street. Dr. Coleman's office was located first on W. Houston and later on S. Wellington. According to Dr. Coleman's obituary, he was born in Ft. Worth to Mr. and Mrs. P. Coleman. He received his early education in El Paso. He completed his college and professional training in Illiinois. In 1910 he moved to Marshall and began a practice that lasted 53 years. He performed numerous professional, church and civic duties; but notable was his involvement in establishing the first tuberculosis hospital in Kerrville. His first wife, Edith, died in 1949. He later married Willia, a union which lasted until his passing on June 10, 1963. He is presumed to be buried in the Powder Mill Cemetery, in a plot with a Coleman family marker having no individual names or dates.
[Dr. H. D. Bruce, Educator and Library Supporter]
Dr. H. D. Bruce of East Texas Baptist College was a supporter of the drive to build a new public library in Marshall, as this article explains. The new building was completed in 1973.
[Dr. James R. Sheppard, Marshall Physician]
Dr. James R. Sheppard was an African-American physician who established a hospital in Marshall in 1925. It was located at 606 S. Carter St. in the historic New Town Neighborhood in the western part of the city. It was called the Sheppard Sanitarium on the Sanborn Maps. Later the hospital was purchased by Dr. Williams Watts and renamed the Sheppard-Watts Hospital. Nothing more is known about Dr. Sheppard.
[Dr. Joseph J. Rhoads, President of Bishop College]
Dr. Joseph J. Rhoads was an educator, administrator, and advocate for civil rights in education who completed his career as the first African-American president of Bishop College in Marshall. He was born in 1890 in Marshall, and was educated there. He received his first degree from Bishop College; his second degree from the University of Michigan; and a Lit. D. degree from Bishop College. He also did graduate work at Yale University, receiving a scholarship there. He held numerous positions as teacher and school administrator from Texas to Alabama before being appointed to the presidency of Bishop in 1929. He led Bishop to its first accreditation by the Texas Dept. of Education and other major accrediting associations. During his tenure, Dr. Rhoads discontinued Bishop's high school department, opened a junior college campus in Dallas, and affiliated with the United Negro College Fund. He also organized the Lacy Kirk Williams Ministers' Institute, a short-term training center for inservice ministers and laity. He consistently advocated for racial equality in education through the offices he held in numerous organizations. Dr. Rhoads died in 1951, and was buried in the McJohnson Cemetery in Marshall.
[Dr. M. W. Dogan, Wiley College President]
Close-up portrait of Dr. Matthew Winfred Dogan, showing only his face and part of his collar. Dogan was president of Wiley University (now Wiley College) in 1896.
[Dr. Nolan H. Anderson, Marshall Physician]
Dr. Nolan Hamilton Anderson was a physician in Marshall who established the University Medical Clinic on University Ave. in Marshall. He was also one of the founders of the Harrison County Nursing Home. Born Nov. 8, 1910, he died in August, 1977.
[Early Audio Equipment at Marshall Public Library]
A view of the audio equipment which was current when Marshall Public Library was built in 1973.
[Early Grave in Harrison County]
An old tombstone in Harrison County is engraved "Mother Bessie." A cherub's head with wings adorns the stone. The cemetery is unidentified.
[East Texas Oil Museum, Kilgore]
An oil derrick stands in front of the East Texas Oil Museum. Located on the Kilgore College campus at Hwy 259 and Ross St, it commemorates the discovery of oil in East Texas in 1930.