Marshall Public Library - 742 Matching Results

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[Antioch Baptist Church in Harrison County]

Description: Antioch Baptist Church is in the rural Leigh community of Harrison County. The location is the intersection of FM 1999 and FM 134. It was formally organized in 1866 by an African-American congregation. It began as a brush arbor. The first church, built in the 1880's, burned. The second building replaced it in 1921. This red brick building has air conditioning units enclosed in fencing on each side. The front gabled roof has a small gable above the entrance.
Date: unknown

[Art Prints at the Public Library]

Description: An art collection was on display at Marshall Public Library, date unknown. The works all have a western theme. Also visible are the library's card catalog at left, storage cabinets at right, and a reading table with red chairs in the foreground. The presence of a card catalog dates the display event between 1973-1990.
Date: unknown

[Audrey Kariel and Charles Spangler Celebrate Opening of Marshall Public Library]

Description: Mrs. Audrey D. Kariel, Project Coordinator, and Martin Spangler, Chairman, celebrate the new Marshall Public Library at the formal reception on October 20, 1973. Mrs. Kariel relates "Martin was an inspirational leader. Every agenda carried a quote with motivation. My favorite was 'Your ship cannot come in unless you send some out.' We had to send out many ships to build the new MPL."
Date: 1973

[Barber and Beauty School]

Description: Valerie Hurd's Barber and Beauty School, located at 304 Noland St. in Marshall, Texas, was a long-time business, c1955-c2001. It was first located on Park School St. and relocated to this address c1959. The building burned about 2001. This picture may date from early 1960's.
Date: unknown

[Bethesda Baptist Church, Marshall]

Description: An old photograph, date unknown but likely prior to 1897, depicts Bethesda Baptist Church of Marshall. Originally known as "Colored Baptist Church," the members renamed it about 1887 and then added the word "Missionary" during the 1980's to make the official name "Bethesda Missionary Baptist Church." Bethesda is one of the oldest African-American congregations in Harrison County, being founded in 1867 by 450 souls led by Rev. William Massey with the assistance of Rev. A. E. Clemmons, the pastor of the white First Baptist Church. The members met in Rev. Massey's home at 601 Massey St. until the construction of this one-story wooden structure, probably between 1867 and 1875. The plan included a veranda leading to the vestibule, three aisles, and colored glass in the arched Gothic windows. There was an organ, the first in Marshall, and a belfry. Outside facilities included a baptistry and a well. During 1897-1901, this structure was razed and replaced by a larger brick structure of Gothic style which later burned and was itself replaced. However the front facade of the wooden structure was incorporated into the new buildings as a link with the past. The site at 801 W. Grand (Hwy 80) has been owned continuously by this congregation since the deed was acquired in 1867. It is now listed on the "Buard History Trail" as a site significant to Marshall's African-American heritage.
Date: unknown

[Bethesda Missionary Baptist Church, Marshall]

Description: Bethesda Missionary Baptist Church is a historic African-American congregation. It is located at 801 W. Grand Ave (Hwy 80) in Marshall. The church was established in 1867, making it one of the oldest surviving congregations in Harrison County. It was founded by Rev. A. E. Clemmons, pastor of the white First Baptist Church, and Rev. William Massey, a black religious leader who led 450 persons to form the congregation. Throughout its history, Bethesda's membership has included pastors and members notable not only in Marshall but far beyond. Among the founders was David Abner, who was Harrison County treasurer, state legislator, and delegate to the 1875 Constitutional Convention. Another was Andrew Gross, father of Frederick Gross who became president of Houston College. The congregation also had a leading role in the founding of Bishop College, which was an African-American Baptist institution located in Marshall from 1881-1961. In its beginning the congregation was known simply as "Colored Baptist Church," the name on the deed. When the name was changed, the members chose "Bethesda" to identify with the healing pool of Biblical Jerusalem. During the 1980's, the word "Missionary" was added to reflect denominational affiliation. Bethesda's first dedicated church building was a one-story wooden structure constructed at the present location. A picture of it can be seen in the portal. During 1897-1901, the wooden building was razed for construction of a larger Gothic-style brick building. That one burned in 1953 and was replaced by the nearly identical structure shown in the picture at left. However the original wood facade was retained within the brick facades of both later buildings, creating a physical link with the past. Another link with the past was renewed during the 1980's, when Bethesda began to join with First Baptist Church for occasional worship services and fellowships. Recently the ...
Date: unknown

[Bethesda Missionary Baptist Church, Marshall]

Description: Bethesda Missionary Baptist Church is located at 801 W. Grand Ave. (Hwy 80) in Marshall. A historic African-American congregation, it was founded in 1867 at a time when many newly-emancipated blacks were leaving white churches to establish their own. 450 members founded the first congregation, led by Rev. William Massey, a black religious leader, with the assistance of Rev. A. E. Clemmons, pastor of the white First Baptist Church. The first meetings were held in Rev. Massey's house until the first dedicated building, a one-story wooden structure, was erected at the present location. That structure has an entry in the Texas History Portal. It served until the period 1897-1901, when it was razed and replaced with an enlarged brick building of Gothic style. That one burned in 1953 and was replaced with the nearly identical building which is shown at left. The facade faces south and contains the old wooden facade as a link with the past. In the beginning, the congregation was known simply as "Colored Baptist Church," which was the name on the deed. Later the members changed the name to identify with the healing pool of Bethesda in Biblical Jerusalem. During the 1980's the word "Missionary" was added to reflect denominational affiliation. Throughout its history, the congregation has nurtured pastors and members noted not only in Marshall but also far beyond her borders. A founding member was David Abner, the Harrison County treasurer, House of Representatives member in the Fourteenth Legislature, and delegate to the 1875 Constitutional Convention. Another was Andrew Gross, father of Frederick Gross who became a president of Houston College. Bethesda was also involved in the founding of Bishop College, the black Baptist institution that was located in Marshall from 1881-1961. In 2008 Bethesda was added to the "Buard History Trail" which recognizes historic ...
Date: unknown