Marshall Public Library - Browse

ABOUT BROWSE FEED
[Friend of the Library, Marshall]
A friend of the library, unidentified, was photographed in the library director's office at Marshall Public Library.
[Friends Award First Membership Card]
In this newspaper file photo, the Friends of a Public Library in Marshall, Texas award their first membership card. From left to right are Ken Duggins,City Manager, Tony Bridge, the first president of Friends, and Audrey Kariel, Friends Executive Board member.
[Friends Examine Library Book]
Members of the Friends of a Public Library organization in Marshall, Texas examine a new library reference book in this publicity photo. Seated, left to right, are Fenn Lewis, Nancy Brown Conwell, and Jim Ivey. Standing, left to right, are Tony Bridge and Dick Brassell.
[Friends Host Reception]
Three Friends or volunteers stand by a reception table at Marshall Public Library.
[Friends of a Public Library Gives Bookmobile to the City of Marshall]
Marshall, Texas, Mayor William Huffman (center) accepts the keys to the new bookmobile from Dr. A. F. Veau, (right), president of the Friends of a Public Library as City Manager Ray Jackson (left) looks on. In the background, W.C. Wallace, bookmobile driver, supervises a tour of the vehicle. Caption and photo from the Marshall News Messenger newspaper, Wednesday, April 12, 1978.
[Friends of the Library Inspect the New Bookmobile]
Lou Gaw, left, and Audrey Kariel, right, inspect the Marshall Public Library's new bookmobile. The Friends of a Public Library group acquired a motor home for the purpose. It was refurbished and re-constructed inside for library books. It was ready for use by April, 1978. According to the caption, Hallsville was the first stop on the schedule.
[Friends President Motivates Library Supporters]
Mrs. Charles McKenzie, president of the Gladewater Friends of a Public Library, came to Marshall to speak to local Friends about beginning the drive for a new Marshall public library building.
[Full Gospel Holy Temple Church of Marshall]
The Full Gospel Holy Temple Church of Marshall is located at 3949 W. Pinecrest Dr. It is traditionally an African-American congregation.
[G.A. Rosborough Home, Marshall]
The home of G.A. Rosborough, principal of Pemberton Senior High School in Marshall. Mr. Rosborough was principal there from 1944 to 1972, during the school's African-American period. He died in 1978 and his widow moved to another address. The house is located at 1802 University Ave. The location puts it within the historic African-American area of west Marshall known as the "New Town Neighborhood." The house as shown in the picture is a one-story ranch type with brick facing, large front windows covered with guards, and a roof style that could be called a modified "gambrel."
[Galilee Baptist Church in Harrison County]
Galilee Baptist Church is located in the community of Hallsville in Harrison County. It is a traditionally African-American congregation.
[Galilee Baptist Church, Marshall]
Galilee Baptist Church in Marshall is a congregation with traditional African-American roots.
[Gathering of Leaders, Marshall]
Three men gather at a podium in Marshall. One man reads a sheet of paper while another looks on. The third man is Dr. Theophilus Caviness. With his right hand raised, he appears to be reciting an oath. Microphones in the picture suggest a large meeting room. The date, place and purpose of this solemn event are unknown.
[General Store, Harrison County]
This general store is located in Jonesville, Harrison County. Jonesville was a crossroads and short-line railroad terminal during the county's early history. The store is still in existence. It carried a multitude of items for the home and farm, as this interior photo shows. The building was not modernized beyond electricity, and so has kept its nineteenth century flavor.
[Geneva A. Brown, Harrison County Educator]
Mrs. Geneva A. Brown, Harrison County educator and civic volunteer, posed in front of the curtained windows of the library director's office at Marshall Public Library. Born about 1909 in Gregg County, Mrs. Brown came from a family of educators. She was schooled at Bishop College, the University of Wisconsin, PennState University, North Texas State University, and Prairie View A & M College. She was married to Mr. F. M. Brown. She taught high school English and Latin in Oklahoma before teaching in the one-room schools of Harrison County. In 1948 she was teaching at New Town School when Marshall ISD acquired it. Later she was at Pemberton Senior High School where she taught social studies before becoming director of testing and counselor, a position she held for 24 years. Upon retirement in 1974, her total teaching career spanned 47 years. She was also active in church and civic organizations in Marshall.
[Geneva A. Brown, Harrison County Educator]
Mrs. Geneva A. Brown taught for forty-seven years, forty-two of them in Harrison County. She was born in Texas in 1909 into a teaching family. Her collegiate career included Bishop College, the University of Wisconsin, Penn State, North Texas State, and Prairie View. After brief periods at Idabel, Oklahoma and Mt. Pleasant, she began to teach in a one-room school in Harrison County. When the county schools were consolidated, she was teaching at the New Town School in Marshall. Later she transferred to Pemberton High School, and finally finished her career as a director of testing and counselor. Her picture is from a Pemberton High School yearbook, probably from 1950-1953. Although she was a wife and mother, she participated in numerous civic and church activities.
[George Foreman, Harrison County Celebrity]
In this March 7, 1978 interview, George Foreman announced his return to the boxing ring just eleven days before the first anniversary of his retirement. The ex-heavyweight champion previously boxed with Jimmy Young in Puerto Rico. Following that fight, Foreman experienced a religious conversion which prompted his retirement. He declared that he felt led to return to the ring as a witness to his beliefs. 29 years old at the time of this interview, George Foreman has maintained a ranch south of Marshall in Harrison County for many years. The ranch has training facilities which he used to prepare for several bouts.
[Gertrude E. Ausbrooks, Marshall Educator]
Mrs. G. E. Ausbrooks taught social studies courses at Pemberton High School in Marshall. This picture is a yearbook photo. Mrs. Ausbrooks was the daughter of Charlie and Maggie Fields Buffin. She received her elementary education from Harrison County schools and finished at Central High School in Shreveport. She graduated from Bishop College in Marshall; and followed with work at Texas Southern and Prairie View College. She was a member of professional, civic, and church organizations. She survived J. B. McLin in marriage and was survived by two daughters, Mrs. Gladys James and Mrs. Bennie McClenton. She died on Thursday, July 31, 1969 and was interred in Rose Hill Garden cemetery near Marshall.
[Gertrude. E. Ausbrooks, Marshall Educator]
Mrs. Gertrude E. Ausbrooks taught social studies courses at Pemberton High School in Marshall. In this photo, she receives an award from an unidentified person. She was the daughter of Charlie and Maggie Fields Buffin. She received her elementary education from Harrison County schools and finished at Central High School in Shreveport. She graduated from Bishop College in Marshall; and followed with work at Texas Southern and Prairie View College. She was a member of professional, civic, and church organizations. She survived J. B. McLin in marriage and was survived by two daughters, Mrs. Gladys James and Mrs. Bennie F. McClenton. She died on Thursday, July 31, 1969 and was interred in Rose Hill Garden cemetery near Marshall.
[The Ginocchio Hotel and Restaurant]
The Ginocchio Hotel and Restaurant is located at 700 North Washington Ave., across the tracks from the train depot in Marshall. Local entrepreneur Charles Ginocchio hired architect C. G. Lancaster to design the hotel and oversee its construction, which was completed in 1896. The structure is noted for the interior paneling and staircase of rare curly pine and other rare innovations. The hotel has undergone restoration and various uses since the heyday of railroad travel. The small brick building in the foreground is the AMTRAK ticket office. Passengers descend through a tunnel under the tracks to reach the depot and platform, which are out of sight in the picture. At the left of the picture, beyond the hotel, one can glimpse several victorian homes which add to the historic importance of the entire North Washington area.
[Ginocchop-Cook-Pedison House, Marshall]
The Ginocchio-Cook-Pedison house is located at 615 N. Washington Ave. in Marshall's Historic District. It has a Texas Historical Medallion and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Charles Ginocchio built the house in 1886 in the Victorian plan with Italianate detailing. He built the Ginocchio Hotel next door in 1896 to serve the passenger traffic on the nearby Texas and Pacific Railway line. Charles' estate sold the house to Behn and Eudora Cook. The Cook heirs sold the house to a Greek immigrant, Anthony Pedison, who with his brother James had bought the hotel in 1924. Anthony Pedison and his wife lived in the house from 1934 until recent times.
[Girls Basketball Team of Pemberton High School]
The girls basketball team of Pemberton High School in Marshall is featured in this yearbook photo, year unknown. Eighteen students in uniform are shown with two adults. The adult at right is coach. The school gym is the location of the picture.
[Grand Avenue West, Marshall]
Marshall 's W. Grand Avenue (Hwy 80) at intersection with Grove St. The highway has been widened from two lanes to six since the early days. At one time, stately Victorian homes lined the avenue; only a few remain, and now it is primarily commercial. Turning right on Grove will put the driver on FM 1997 north, as the sign indicates.
[Grant Aids New Library Building]
In September, 1971, a challenge grant from the Andrew Norman Foundation was offered to the Friends of a Public Library in Marshall, Texas for the purpose of building a new library. The $150,000 offer was to be matched by funds raised in Marshall and Harrison County. Following a successful fund drive, the photo shows George Fenn Lewis, president of the Friends, endorsing a balance payment check for $110,000 before presenting it to Dick Brassell, secretary-treasurer of the Friends.
[Grave in Harrison County]
Unidentified grave in Harrison County. The stone has the head of a cherub in the top portion. The word "May" is in the date. Below is "Age 64." The cemetery is unknown.
[Grave in Harrison County]
Photograph of an illegible grave in Harrison County that remains unidentified. A cherub's head is at the top of the stone. A slab covers the grave. The cemetery is also unknown. It appears to be in a wooded area.
[Grave in Marshall]
The grave of Jessie E. Copeland is located in the old Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall. The cemetery has gravesites associated with the early African-American history of Harrison County. A more recent grave, Jessie E. Copeland's stone relates his service during World War II as a private in 1999 QM Truck Co. His vital dates are March 18, 1900 to April 14, 1961.
[Grave, Marshall]
The words and dates on a headstone of blue granite have become illegible. The cemetery is unknown. The decorative flower urns against cutwork are still clear.
[Grave of Amos C. Brown, Marshall]
The grave of Amos C. Brown is located in Nichols (Old Sudduth) Cemetery in east Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. Brown's dates are 1858-1911.
[Grave of Annie Mae Powell, Marshall]
The grave of Annie Mae Powell is in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates on this headstone are Dec. 11 1885 - May 19 1916. The name Powell is in large raised block letters on the middle of the stone. Scroll lines decorate the top edge. Other graves are visible nearby.
[Grave of Ardelia A. Lee, Marshall]
The grave of Ardelia A. Lee is in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997, Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates on the stone are 1868-1932. Other words are "Wife of J. R. E. Lee Good Mother and a Faithful Wife for 50...Years." Stylized flowers decorate the top of the stone. Ardelia A. Lee was the wife of John Robert Edward Lee whose monument is nearby. There is an entry about him in the Texas History Portal.
[Grave of Bro. Monroe Singleton, Harrison County]
Photograph of the grave of Bro. Monroe Singleton in an unidentified, wooded cemetery. The dates for Singleton are Jan. 17 1891 - Jan. 7 1970.
[Grave of Bro. Walter S. Brown, Marshall]
The grave of Bro. Walter S. Brown is in the Nichols (Old Sudduth) Cemetery on Merrill St. in east Marshall. Nichols is a traditionally African-American cemetery. The dates on the stone are 1899 and Jan. 5, 1966, accompanied by the words, "In Memory Of." Another stone is at the distant right. Behind a cyclone fence which encloses the site, a ranch house is visible. The cemetery was once rural. A subdivision has grown around it.
[Grave of Celia Boyd in Marshall]
The grave of Celia Boyd is located in Nichols (Old Sudduth) Cemetery on Merrill St. in east Marshall. Nichols is traditionally an African-American cemetery. The dates on the stone are March 6, 1885-April 15, 1925.
[Grave of Charlie Powell, Marshall]
The grave of Charlie Powell is located in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates on the stone are 1879-1947. Potted flowers stand to the right of the grave. At the rear are a brick border and a cyclone fence.
[Grave of Clarence Edwards, Marshall]
The grave of Clarence Edwards in Marshall is in the Powder Mill Cemetery. At its base are the words, "Precious one from me is gone; A voice I loved is Still; A place is vacant in my heart; Which never can be filled."
[Grave of Clarence Edwards, Marshall]
The grave of Clarence Edwards is located in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates on the stone are Dec. 12, 1968-Dec. 23, 1899. At the base of the stone words of sentiment are engraved..
[Grave of Claudia V. Lias, Marshall]
The grave of Claudia V. Lias is in Nichols Cemetery, Marshall. The name is engraved on both the larger stone and the smaller stone at top. Also engraved on the larger stone are the dates 1922-1947; and the words "U.S. Army" and "World War II." A floral arrangement stands behind. The cemetery, also known as "Old Sudduth," is located on Merrill Street in the eastern half of the city in the middle of a modern residential neighborhood. The acreage along Merrill was once a farm owned by the Merril family. The cemetery is primarily an African-American site. It is enclosed by a cyclone fence.
[Grave of David E. Hawkins Jr, Marshall]
The grave of David E. Hawkins is in Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates on the stone are May 28 1930 - July 6 1953. The words "Texas" and "US Air Force" are also engraved. There is a plain encircled cross at the top. The stone sits on a block base and that on a slab. A flower arrangement sits to the left. Some refined plants are mixed with weeds around the site and there is a stone border showing behind the grave. Another grave is nearby.
[Grave of Edwin F. Davis, Marshall]
The grave of Edwin F. Davis lies in the Powder Mill Cemetery in Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. Dates on the stone are 1905-1934.
[Grave of Eva Lee Jones, Marshall]
The grave of Eva Lee Jones is in Powder Mill Cemetery, Marshall. The cemetery is located on FM 1997 in the north city area. It is a traditionally African-American cemetery. Her date of death was Mar. 21, 1938. These words are engraved: "Asleep in Jesus Blessed Sleep From Which None Ever Wake to Weep."
[Grave of Father and Son Leach, Marshall]
The graves of Matthew Leach, Sr. and Matthew Leach, Jr. are in the Powder Mill Cemetery in Marshall. The cemetery, located on FM 1997 in Marshall, is traditionally African-American. Dates of Matthew Leach, Sr. are 1882-1952. Dates of Matthew Leach, Jr. are 1910-1968. Stalks of flowers are engraved into the top of the single stone which touches two slabs. A vase of flowers rests on the slab at left. Another grave is visible to the left also. Behind the scene is an iron fence.
[Grave of Frank C. White, Marshall]
The grave of Frank C. White is in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997, Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates on the stone are March 1 1889 - Feb 14 1956. Other information on the stone is "TEXAS PVT STU ARMY TNG CORPS WORLD WAR I." A plain encircled cross adorns the top.
[Grave of Henry C. Clark, Marshall]
The grave of Henry C. Clark is located in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates on the stony are Nov. 14, 1894-Oct. 16, 1958. Other engravings are "Louisiana 1st SGT CO D 306 SVC BN QMC World War 1."
[Grave of Henry Campbell, Marshall]
The grave of Henry Campbell is in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997, Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates on the stone are "BORN 7-2-1899 DIED 2-9-1976." The engraving is plain as though hand-hewn. The stone rests on a slab.
[Grave of J. W. Sanders, Marshall]
This headstone is located in Nichols (aka Old Sudduth) Cemetery in Marshall. It is on the grave of J. W. Sanders. The dates are Nov. 25, 1851 - Nov. 14, 1928. Some faint design appears above the lettering; and there also may be a different style of engraving below. Tangles of vines and other vegetation surrounds the old stone. Nichols Cemetery is located at the end of Merrill St. in the eastern part of the city. Long ago this was part of rural property that has been developed into modern subdivisions. This rather small cemetery is traditionally used and maintained by the African-American community. However it may contain the graves of some whites due to its beginning as a burial ground for the white family that originally owned the acreage.
[Grave of James Bell, Marshall]
The grave of James Bell is in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. Dates on the stone are 1879-1951, followed by the words "Age 72" and "At Rest." At the top of the stone is a flying bird.
[Grave of James Thomas, Marshall]
The grave of James Thomas is located in Nichols (Old Sudduth) Cemetery on Merrill St. in east Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American, although there may be graves of Caucasions there. The stone rests at the corner of a large slab. Dates engraved on it are 1882-1974. Another stone and marker are in the foreground. An empty urn shows at the left center. Fresh funeral flowers are in the distance at left. A shed or house corner is at the center background.
[Grave of Jennie Knighten, Marshall]
The grave of Jennie Knighten is located in Nichols (Old Sudduth) Cemetery on Merrill St. in east Marshall. The site is traditionally African-American. The dates on the stone are Born 1877 and Died Jun 29 1937. The cemetery is enclosed by a cyclone fence seen in the background and surrounded by a subdivision. A ranch house is visible beyond the fence.
[Grave of Jessie E. Copeland, Marshall]
The grave of Jessie E. Copeland is located in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997 in Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates are March 18, 1900-April 14, 1961. Other engravings are "Texas PVT 1999 QM Truck Co World War II."
[Grave of John L. A. Baltimore, Marshall]
The grave of John L. A. Baltimore is in the Powder Mill Cemetery on FM 1997, Marshall. The cemetery is traditionally African-American. The dates on the stone are Feb 5 1914 and Oct 17 1956. Other information is "TEXAS CK2 USNR World War II." There is a simple encircled cross at the top. The stone is attached to a larger slab. A pot of flowers sits above.