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[600 Block S. May - Dilley's Iron Foundry]

Description: Illinois-native George Mansfield Dilley, the prominent railroad-building contractor who played an instrumental role in the expansion of railroads throughout Texas and the South, established this foundry in 1873, one year after the railroad arrived in Palestine. The George M. Dilley & Son Foundry, located adjacent to the I&GN tracks, at one time contained more than ten buildings. The enterprise manufactured some farm equipment and machinery, but its primary output was gray iron and brass castings for Texas railroads. The elder Dilley moved to Dallas in the 1880s, but the foundry continued to be run by his son, George Edward Dilley – one of Palestine’s most prominent citizens of the late 19th century. G.E. Dilley continued operations at the foundry until his death in 1932; his son Clarence V. Dilley then took over until his own death five years later. In the mid-1930s, the plant had an average payroll of about twenty thousand dollars, for a workforce of twenty to twenty-five men. The foundry ceased operations in the late 1930s. All that remains today are the frame office building, the nearby brick brass furnace building, and a lengthy iron fence which borders the property and faces May Street (which local historians believe was named after G.M. Dilley’s infant daughter, Edna May Dilley, who died in 1872).
Date: 1875~
Item Type: Photograph

[600 Block S. May - Dilley's Iron Foundry]

Description: Illinois-native George Mansfield Dilley, the prominent railroad-building contractor who played an instrumental role in the expansion of railroads throughout Texas and the South, established this foundry in 1873, one year after the railroad arrived in Palestine. The George M. Dilley & Son Foundry, located adjacent to the I&GN tracks, at one time contained more than ten buildings. The enterprise manufactured some farm equipment and machinery, but its primary output was gray iron and brass castings for Texas railroads. The elder Dilley moved to Dallas in the 1880s, but the foundry continued to be run by his son, George Edward Dilley – one of Palestine’s most prominent citizens of the late 19th century. G.E. Dilley continued operations at the foundry until his death in 1932; his son Clarence V. Dilley then took over until his own death five years later. In the mid-1930s, the plant had an average payroll of about twenty thousand dollars, for a workforce of twenty to twenty-five men. The foundry ceased operations in the late 1930s. All that remains today are the frame office building, the nearby brick brass furnace building, and a lengthy iron fence which borders the property and faces May Street (which local historians believe was named after G.M. Dilley’s infant daughter, Edna May Dilley, who died in 1872).
Date: 1875~
Item Type: Photograph

[Palestine Building - Corner of Spring Str & N. Sycamore]

Description: Photograph of a two-story building complex at the corner of Spring and N. Sycamore streets in Palestine, Texas. There is a two-story wrap-around porch on the corner; the suites on the left side of the building have entrances only on the first floor. This building was occupied by Durr's Book Store, Kolstad's Jewelry Store and A.W. Gregg's Law Office was in the front of the second floor. You can see the steeple of the St. Phillips church in the background. There are people standing in the street and around the entrances.
Date: 1880~
Item Type: Photograph
Location Info:

[Spring Street - Palestine]

Description: Photo of an Spring Street (once Front Street) in Palestine, Texas. Railroad tracks are visible, as well as the original wooden depot.
Date: 1880~
Item Type: Photograph

[Third Anderson County Courthouse]

Description: In 1885, Palestine, like most of the country, was in the midst of a depression, complicated by a series of railroad strikes, so there was little new construction. However, Anderson County had to have a new courthouse because the old one was literally falling down. And they were determined to have the finest and most up-to-date building that could be constructed. The Architect that was hired was William C. Dodson of Waco and building commenced in June of 1885 after demolition was completed on the old building. It was completed in May 1886 at a cost of $40,000 and was indeed impressive looking with it's tall three story dome and clocktower. The life of the building was cut short when a couple of incendiaries set fire to it on the night of January 6, 1913, in order to destroy evidence against one of them. The plan failed because the actual court records were housed in fireproof rooms, which were not damaged.
Date: 1885 - 1916
Item Type: Photograph

[Third Anderson County Courthouse]

Description: Photograph of the third Anderson County Courthouse in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story brick building with stone accents and a taller tower on one corner. There are saddled horses along the fence in the foreground.
Date: 1885~
Item Type: Photograph

[Third Anderson County Courthouse]

Description: Photograph of the third Anderson County Courthouse in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story brick building with stone accents and a taller tower on one corner. There are saddled horses along the fence in the foreground.
Date: 1885~
Item Type: Photograph

[Third Anderson County Courthouse]

Description: Copy negative of the third Anderson County Courthouse in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story brick building with stone accents and a taller tower on one corner. It is viewed from the other side of a dirt road.
Date: 1885~
Item Type: Photograph

[Third Anderson County Courthouse]

Description: Photograph of the third Anderson County Courthouse in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story brick building with stone accents and a taller tower on one corner. There are saddled horses along the fence in the foreground.
Date: [1885..1916]
Item Type: Photograph

[Third Anderson County Courthouse]

Description: Copy negative of the third Anderson County Courthouse in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story brick building with stone accents and a taller tower on one corner. A gazebo is visible on the grounds, to the right, and several unidentified people are standing near one corner of the building.
Date: [1885..1916]
Item Type: Photograph

[Temple Opera House - Palestine, Texas]

Description: Photo of the Temple Opera House which was located on the corner of Avenue A and Oak Street in downtown Palestine. As per the 1898-1899 city directory, the manager was a man named W.E. Swift. The building has since been destroyed.
Date: 1890 - 1905
Item Type: Photograph

[210 Crawford - J.H. Silliman Home]

Description: Photo of the J.H. Silliman Home, located at 210 Crawford. A Mississippi native, J.H. Silliman was the proprietor of Silliman and Company – a Palestine business founded in 1871, and one of the largest hardware stores in the region. Silliman married Laura Brook, the architect’James Frith Brook's, daughter, in 1920. The family later moved to 638 S. Magnolia.
Date: 1898~
Item Type: Photograph

[American Home Bakery]

Description: Photograph of a group of people posing outside the American Home Bakery, located at the corner of John and Oak streets in Palestine, Texas. There are two horse-drawn delivery wagons outside the building and the horses are being held by boys; several other people, most wearing aprons, are posed outside the entrance behind them.
Date: 1899~
Item Type: Photograph
Location Info:

[407 E. Kolstad - Mallard Alexander House]

Description: One of the oldest homes in Palestine, this house was built using slave labor in 1848 by Judge John B. Mallard. Surrounded by stately oak and cedar trees, it continues to be on its original foundation of one and one-half foot cedar logs and has been repaired and remodeled by later owners. Marked by the State of Texas n 1952, it has been the home of the Forrest Bradberrys since 1957. Judge Mallard and his wife, the former Susan S. Scott, came to Texas from Mississippi in 1845 and settled at Old Fort Houston. In February 1846, he moved to Palestine, the new county seat of Anderson County which had been organized that same year, and purchased ten acres, known as the Mallard Block. This acreage was located just north of the then city limits which is now in Old Town Palestine. The Mallards had seven children including Mrs. Bettie Oder, a beloved teacher in Palestine for forty-six years. Mrs. Oder was born at this home in 1849 and died in Houston in 1940. Also born here was Mrs. Barbara Alexander Eppner. The first census of early Palestine was compiled n 1848 by Mrs. John Mallard, and included the families living in the original town site, a total of 148 whites and 31 negro slaves. Judge Mallard, the first lawyer to practice in Palestine, served as a member of the Fifth Texas Legislature, and was the second Chief Justice of Anderson County. In 1852, he formed a law partnership with Judge William Alexander and Judge John H. Reagan. In 1854, Judge Mallard died and on March 8, 1857, his widow married Judge Alexander. Judge William Alexander, born in Scotland on September 10, 1814, came to Galveston in 1850 and on to Palestine. In 1860, shortly before the outbreak of the ...
Date: 1900~
Item Type: Photograph

[410 Avenue A - First Presbyterian Church]

Description: Copy negative of the front of the First Presbyterian Church, located at 410 Avenue A in Palestine, Texas. It is a red-brick building with white stone accents that has a Gothic architecture design including leaded stained glass and Tiffany memorial windows. There is a tall silver spire above the tower on the left side of the building. A smaller building is visible to the left.
Date: 1900~
Item Type: Photograph
Location Info:

[412 S. Royall - Royall House]

Description: Copy negative of the front of a two-story house located at 416 S. Royall in Palestine, Texas. There are people on the porch and in the front yard.
Date: 1900~
Item Type: Photograph
Location Info:

[Bowers Mansion - 301 S. Magnolia]

Description: Photograph of the north and east sides of the "Bowers Mansion" located at 301 S. Magnolia in Palestine, Texas. It is a two-story house that has Victorian Italiante-style architectural elements (including a small cupola with bracketed eaves and narrow, paired windows), and a two-tiered porch with Queen Anne-style turned- and jigsawn- wood trim. This photo was taken from the corner of south Magnolia and west Bowers streets.
Date: 1900~
Item Type: Photograph
Location Info: