TCU Mary Couts Burnett Library - 538 Matching Results

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Baylor at TCU football game

Description: This film captures highlights from a football game between the Baylor University Bears and the Texas Christian University Horned Frogs. (TCU players are wearing white jerseys.) The Southwest Conference rivalry game was played on October 29, 1938, at Amon G. Carter Stadium in Fort Worth.While Baylor scored an early touchdown, TCU ran away with the game, ultimately winning 39-7. TCU finished the season with an undefeated 11-0 record, outscoring their opponents 269-60. The AP Poll crowned the Horned Frogs the national champions after they defeated Carnegie Tech in the Sugar Bowl on January 2, 1939. TCU’s quarterback, Davey O’Brien, also won the Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award, and Walter Camp Award—the first player in history to win all three in a single season. O’Brien was also the first Heisman winner from not only TCU but also the Southwest Conference.
Date: October 29, 1938

The Changing Congress: The Rules of the Game

Description: Produced by the National Education Radio and Television Center, The Changing Congress is a nine-part television series looking at the issues confronting federal legislators. Part 3, entitled “The Rules of the Game,” focuses on the long and sometimes informal process of passing legislation through the houses of Congress. To do so, the broadcast follows Congressman Jim Wright as he attempts to push a bill on water pollution. Wright meets with other members of the House Committee on Public Works and hosts a dinner at his home in Washington, D.C., before finally getting his bill to be put to a vote on the House floor.
Date: 1965
Creator: National Education Radio and Television Center

A Day in the Life of a United States Senator

Description: This 1958 television documentary overviews a typical day on Capitol Hill for Senator Ralph Yarborough of Texas. (Yarborough was seeking reelection at the time.) After eating breakfast with his wife and conferring with his staff, Yarborough attends a hearing of the Post Office and Civil Service Committee and sits in on a session. All the while, he makes time for Texans visiting the national capital.
Date: 1958

Fort Worth Flooding and Evacuation

Description: Shot by the staff of Congressman Jim Wright, this footage captures the aftermath of a flood in Fort Worth, most likely from 1957. In May of that year, after weeks of torrential rains across Texas, more than 4,000 people were evacuated from unprotected lowlands along local creeks and the West Fork of the Trinity River in Fort Worth. In the film, residents combat severe floodwaters, salvaging property out of their homes and evacuating by boat to higher ground. Wright also appears to survey the damage and help in relief efforts.
Date: 1957
Creator: Congressional office of Jim Wright

Forum Five

Description: Presented by the Public Affairs Department of Fort Worth’s WBAP News, this episode of “Forum Five” looks at the educational opportunities afforded by and local importance of Texas Christian University. WBAP reporters Lowell Duncan and Bruce Neal first overview some of the university’s leading academic programs, such as the TCU Research Foundation. They also outline how the university contributes to Fort Worth and Tarrant County, from the many workers it employs to the leaders it shapes to the cultural activities it supports. TCU Chancellor James Maddox Moudy and Professor of English Jim Corder also speak.
Date: 1969
Creator: Public Affairs Department of Fort Worth WBAP News

Hubert Humphrey Campaign Rallies

Description: In 1968, then-Vice President Hubert Humphrey won the Democratic Party’s nomination for president and embarked upon a national tour to build support for his candidacy. Included amongst the many stops he made were visits to Fort Worth and Dallas, captured in this footage. After landing at Carswell Field, Humphrey visits with several Texas politicians, including Governor of Texas John Connally and United States Congressman Jim Wright of Fort Worth. He then delivers speeches at a public rally and a campaign dinner. Next, Humphrey flies to Dallas, where he speaks at another campaign rally. First Lady Lady Bird Johnson also makes an appearance.
Date: 1968

Jim Wright Campaign Rally in Fort Worth

Description: Following the 1960 presidential election, a special election was held to fill the United States Senate seat vacated by then Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson. This live telecast from March 1961 captures a rally for candidate Jim Wright at the Will Rogers Memorial Center in Fort Worth. (Wright was then serving in the United States House of Representatives from Texas’ 12th congressional district.) The election drew a field of 71 contenders, with Republican John G. Tower narrowly defeating interim appointee and Democrat William Blakely in a runoff election. (As a result, Tower became the first Republican senator from Texas since Reconstruction.) Wright finished in third place.
Date: March 1961
Creator: Jim Wright Campaign

Jim Wright for U.S. Senate

Description: Following the 1960 presidential election, a special election was held to fill the United States Senate seat vacated by then Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson. This telecast from May 1961 promotes the candidacy of Jim Wright, who was then serving in the United States House of Representatives from Texas’ 12th congressional district. The election drew a field of 71 potential candidates, with Republican John G. Tower narrowly defeating interim appointee and Democrat William Blakely in a runoff election. (As a result, Tower became the first Republican senator from Texas since Reconstruction.) Wright finished in third place.
Date: May 1961
Creator: Jim Wright Campaign

Meet Your Congressman

Description: This educational film starring Representative Jim Wright of Fort Worth encourages American citizens to “drop in and say hello” to sitting congressmen when visiting Washington, D.C. In the staged interaction, a group of young people visit with Wright in his office, learning about the unique role of Congress and what they might expect to see on the House floor. After their conversation, Wright sends the teens on a guided tour of the Supreme Court.
Date: 1960~/1969~

Oral History Interview with A.C. Jaime, July 2, 2015

Description: Interview with A.C. Jaime, an accountant from McAllen, Texas. Jaime was the first Mexican-American mayor of Pharr, Texas. In his interview, Jaime discusses his early life, education, political and professional career, the riots in Pharr, and race relations in the Rio Grande Valley
Date: July 2, 2015
Creator: Jaime, A. C.; Enriquez, Sandra & Robles, David

Oral History Interview with Abel Bosquez, June 8, 2016

Description: Basquez was raised in the Panhandle and joined the Marines as a young man. Upon returning, the settled in Amarillo and eventually obtained a job at Pantex. At Pantex, he became invovled with Union organizating and evetnually became an organizer lobbying in Washington DC. From there, he began joining other ogranizations such as LULAC to raise scolarship money as well as to promote voter regestration. He ran for State Representative in Amarillo three times.
Date: June 8, 2016
Creator: Bosquez, Abel; Wisely, Karen & Zapata, Joel

Oral History Interview with Addie Walker, July 29, 2016

Description: Ms. Walker grew up Raywood, Texas which is a unincorporated town of a few hundred people. She was born in 1943 in Liberty County. Walker discussed the Black neighborhood she grew up in and changes in Raywood over time. Walker described her experiences attending segregated schools including the quality of resources and instruction. Walker also discussed the role of colorism in the community. Walker described a divide between some Black children and Creole children based on color. Walker left Raywood to attend Prairie View and returned to Raywood. Walker has taught in Raywood schools for 52 years. Walker also discusses how segregation operated in such a small town. She described a more positive Black-White relations during segregation in comparison to how others described race relations in surrounding areas.
Date: July 29, 2016
Creator: Howard, Jasmin & Walker, Addie

Oral History Interview with Adela Vasquez, July 16, 2016

Description: Adela Vasquez was born (1949) and raised in Odessa, Texas. Her family was able to move to the Anglo area of West Odessa when she was a child. Vasquez attended the predominantly Anglo School, Zavala Elementary. She later went to Ector High School, where she graduated in 1967. Vasquez attended Odessa College, where she met her husband Gilbert Vasquez, and then attended Texas Tech University. Vasquez also obtained an MA degree in psychology at Texas Tech University. Vasquez held various leadership positions in Ector County ISD and Region 18.
Date: July 16, 2016
Creator: Wisely, Karen; Zapata, Joel & Vasquez, Adela

Oral History Interview with Agustin Loredo, July 15, 2016

Description: Agustin Loredo was born in Baytown, Texas in 1974 and comes from a family with long ties to the area. In the 1930s, several family members, including his father, were repatriated even though they were U.S. citizens. Loredo grew up with stories (that he later researched as a college student at UH) about the vibrant Mexican American community in Baytown, including stories of fiestas patrias and Guadalupe Church, the hub for the community. In 1996, he attended the University of Houston, where he enrolled in courses taught by the Center for Mexican American Studies (CMAS). These courses sparked his interest in the culture, history, and eventually encouraged his community involvement. After he spent some time in Austin, he returned to Baytown in the early 2000s. After the Luis Alfonso Torres police incident in 2002, Loredo met Fred Aguilar, and became involved in the marches and protests that followed. Loredo witnessed the coalition of African Americans and Latinos to help the youth of Baytown. He then became a member of the West Baytown Homeowners Association and a board member for the Promise Center (led by Aguilar). A teacher at South Houston High School, he is an advocate for Mexican American Studies not only in his school but also across the state of Texas. Loredo also joined the Librotraficante Caravan to Tucson in (2012 or 2013). He currently serves as a board member for the Goose Creek Independent School District, where he is an advocate for the Latino student population and has led several efforts, including the naming of schools after community heroes and the institution of ethnic studies classes.
Date: July 15, 2016
Creator: Enriquez, Sandra; Rodriguez, Samantha & Loredo, Agustin

Oral History Interview with Alcadio Zamudio, July 1, 2015

Description: Interview with Alcadio Zamudio, from Weslaco, Texas. In his interview, Mr. Zamudio discusses his background, attending the University of Wisconsin, organizing in Wisconsin among migrant workers, La Raza Unida in Wisconsin, the Pharr, Texas riot, and other topics related to Chicano rights and political activity.
Date: July 1, 2015
Creator: Enriquez, Sandra; Robles, David & Zamudio, Alcadio

Oral History Interview with Alejandro Perez, July 14, 2016

Description: Perez talked about his life as a migrant worker and working in a cannery. Supporting the walkouts in Uvalde was his first political march. He also participated in voter registration drives at Texas A&I. Mr. Perez also discusses his time working with the La Raza Unida Party in Crystal City.
Date: July 14, 2016
Creator: Sinta, Vinicio; Arionus, Steve & Perez, Alejandro

Oral History Interview with Alford Littleton, July 9, 2016

Description: Alford Littleton was born in Corvell County, Texas. His family briefly moved to California then returned to Texas when moving to Odessa during the 1950s. Littleton attended segregated schools while in Odessa and graduated valedictorian from Blackshear High School. Littleton attended the University of Texas at Austin for two years, but he returned to Odessa to work and raise a family. In Odessa, Littleton became the first African American to work within Shell’s refinery lab. He later started his own engineering testing company in Dallas, Texas—the first such company in Dallas owned by an African American.
Date: July 9, 2016
Creator: Wisely, Karen; Zapata, Joel & Littleton, Alford

Oral History Interview with Alfredo Santos on July 4, 2016.

Description: Alfredo Santos was born in southern California; after spending the first years of his life attending schools there, he moved to Uvalde and started attending schools there. While he had some awareness of disparities and the strains in relations between Anglos and Mexican Americans, he became politicized while attending high school. He joined the local chapter of MAYO, led by Amaro Cardona and Rogelio Muñoz, and was involved in their early direct action activities, including protests against police brutality and their efforts to instill ethnic pride among Mexican American students. While he was no longer attending school, he supported the 1970 walkout. Santos later moved to California and went to college there, majoring in economics at UCLA. While in California, his activism turned to farm workers' struggle (and in the interview he suggested this was his main interest). The next decades, Santos worked in a variety of jobs in different places; upon returning to Texas, he created a network of bilingual publications named La Voz -- one of which was based in Uvalde. Santos currently runs La Voz in Austin and is highly involved in Chicano politics across Texas.
Date: July 4, 2016
Creator: Sinta, Vinicio & Santos, Alfredo

Oral History Interview with Alice Valdez, June 14, 2016

Description: Alice E. Valdez was born in El Paso, and grew up in a middle class, Anglo and Mexican American community. She discusses her father's WWII experience to detail. Ms. Valdez was involved in the arts from an early age through church groups and in school activities. She attended the University of Texas at El Paso where she was part of the band and graduated with a degree in music. She recalled the 1966 Texas Western College (name prior to UTEP) NCAA Basketball Championship during her college experience. Upon graduation, Ms. Valdez moved with her husband to Atlanta for his military service. She moved to Houston in 1971. Due to her arts background, she became involved in creating arts programs for children and subsequently founded the Multicultural Education Counseling through the Arts Center, (MECA).
Date: June 14, 2016
Creator: Enriquez, Sandra; Rodriguez, Samantha & Valdez, Alice

Oral History Interview with Alicia Chacon, July 25, 2016

Description: Interview with Alicia Chacon, the first Mexican-American woman to be elected as a city council representative from El Paso, Texas. She was also elected to the school board and as county clerk. Chacon discusses her community involvement and political career, including working in the Jimmy Carter administration.
Date: July 25, 2015
Creator: Chacon, Alicia; Enriquez, Sandra & Robles, David