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Palmito Hill Battlefield Memorial

Description: Southward facing panoramic photograph of Palmito Hill Battlefield, the last land battle of the American Civil War on May 12-13, 1865. As viewed from the interpretive platform of the Historic Landmark near Boca Chica Blvd. and Palmito Hill Rd.
Date: June 27, 2018
Creator: Hicks, William
Location Info:

Historical Marker: Battle of Palmito Ranch

Description: Photograph of historical marker entitled: "Battle of Palmito Ranch." Text reads: "The last land engagement of the Civil War was fought near this site on May 12-13, 1865, thirty-four days after Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox. Col. Theodore H. Barrett commanded Federal troops on Brazos Island 12 miles to the east. The Confederates occupied Fort Brown 12 miles to the west, commanded by Gen. James E. Slaughter and Col. John S. (Rip) Ford, whose troops had captured Fort Brown from the Federals in 1864. Ordered to recapture the fort, Lt. Col. David Branson and 300 men advanced from Brazos Island. They won a skirmish with Confederate pickets on May 12. Barrett reinforced Branson's troops with 200 men on May 13 and renewed the march to Fort Brown. Confederate cavalry held the Federals in check until Ford arrived with reinforcements that afternoon. Ford's artillery advanced and fired on the northern end of the Federal line while the cavalry charged. The Confederate right charged the southern end of the Federal line and captured part of the Union infantry. Barrett ordered a retreat toward the U.S. position on Brazos Island. While the Confederates reported no fatalities in the Battle of Palmito Ranch, the Union forces reported four officers and 111 men killed, wounded or missing." Dated: 1966, 1990.
Date: June 24, 2018
Creator: Hicks, William
Location Info:

Historical Marker: Last Battle of the Civil War

Description: Photograph of a historical marker commemorating the last battle of the Civil War. The text reads: "At This Site -- The Last Battle of the Civil War, Known as Palmito Hill, was Fought by Confederate Troops Under Colonel John S. (Rip) Ford and Union Forces on May 13, 1865, 34 Days After Lee's Surrender at Appomatox -- Erected by the State of Texas -- 1936"
Date: June 24, 2018
Creator: Hicks, William
Location Info:

Historical Marker: Site of Camp Belknap

Description: Photograph of Historical Marker entitled: "Site of Camp Belknap." Text reads: "In May 1846 when war was declared against Mexico, the U.S. Congress authorized the raising of 50,000 volunteer troops to supplement the regular U.S. Army. General Zachary Taylor was quickly inundated with volunteer soldiers arriving at Brazos Santiago, and was forced to place them in temporary encampments. Camp Belknap, located on this site, was established in the summer of 1846. The camp was located on a long narrow rise of land, measuring about 2 miles in length and one-half mile at its widest point. It was the first high ground encountered after leaving the Gulf Coast. Thought to be the largest encampment for volunteer soldiers, troop estimates total 7,000-8,000 men including several regiments from eight states. Soldiers suffered exposure to the elements, unsanitary living conditions, overcrowding, biting insects, thorny plants, and disease. Many died a premature death, often resulting in one two two funerals daily. No enemy attacks took place despite one false alarm. During August and September most of the volunteers were moved upriver either to camps nearer Matamoros, or further to Camargo. The camp was completely empty by December 1846." Marker is dated 1996 in the lower-right corner.
Date: June 24, 2018
Creator: Hicks, William
Location Info:

Point Isabel Coast Guard Building on South Padre Island

Description: Southward facing photograph of the 1923 Point Isabel Coast Guard Building located on South Padre Island. A small historical marker on the opposite side reads: "The Federal Government has operated a coastal installation at Point Isabel since 1852. This structure is the third permanent building erected here, one of a line of nine stations established along the Gulf of Mexico from Florida to the Texas-Mexico border. Originally consisting of a main floor, attic, and lookout tower, all elevated off the ground on wood and concrete pilings, the structure served as barracks and headquarters for the U.S. Coast Guard unit that patrolled the coastline and conducted sea rescues. (1988)"
Date: June 24, 2018
Creator: Hicks, William
Location Info:

Historical Marker: El Paso Salt War

Description: Photograph of state historical marker located near the salt flats of Hudspeth County. The marker has several gunshot markings and reads: "Resentment over private control of the salt lakes in this region, often called Guadalupe Lakes, led to the El Paso Salt War. - Erected by the State of Texas 1936."
Date: June 8, 2018
Creator: Hicks, William
Location Info:

Guadalupe Peak Historical Marker

Description: Photograph of Texas Historical Commission Marker entitled "Guadalupe Peak". Text Reads: "Guadalupe Peak, Texas' highest mountain at 8,751 feet, dominates one of the most scenic and least-known hinterlands of the old frontier. It lies behind and to the right of 8,078-foot El Capitan, the sheer cliff that rises more than 3,000 feet above this spot to mark the south end of the Guadalupe range. Starkness of the mountainside belies the lushness which the Guadalupes conceal. Tucked away in their inner folds are watered canyons shaded by towering ponderosa pine, douglas fir, juniper and quaking aspen. McKittrick Canyon, scene of a four-mile trout stream, is also the habitat of the state's only herd of wild elk. Seer and turkeys abound. Stories of hidden gold go back to Spanish days. The conquistadors who rode north from Mexico wrote about fabulous deposits. Geronimo, the Apache chief, said the richest gold mines in the western world lay hidden in the Guadalupes. Legend holds that Ben Sublett, a colorful prospector of the 1880s, slipped off at night to a cave and returned with bags of nuggets. Probably less is known about the archeology of the Guadalupes than of any other area in the Southwest. Excavators have found spearheads, pictographs and human remains together with bones of long-extinct bison, dire wolf and musk ox in cliff caves. At hermit cave in last chance canyon, carbon-14 dating indicates occupancy 12,000 years ago. Geologically, the Guadalupes present a spectacular exposure of the famous capitan prehistoric barrier reef, said to be the most extensive fossil organic reef known."
Date: June 7, 2018
Creator: Hicks, William
Location Info: