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[Poem]

Description: Handwritten patriotic poem from H. K. Redway's personal papers.
Date: unknown
Creator: Redway, H. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Poem by Grace Dupree Ridings

Description: Print of a bird on a fence with a poem by Grace Dupree Ridings. The poem, "Have You?", is as follows: "Have you ever / Seen new violets, / Have you heard / A robin sing, / When you can / Keep from thinking / It is Spring... / It is Spring?"
Date: unknown
Creator: Ridings, Grace Dupree
Partner: Sam Rayburn House State Historical Site

"In the Matter of Friendship" poem by Harry B. Hawes

Description: Print of a poem by Harry B. Hawes. Poem title: "In the Matter of Friendship." Printed on ivory colored paper in black ink. A facsimile of Hawe's signature is at the lower right of the printed poem. Hawes was a democrat from Missouri who served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1921-1926. He served in the U.S. Senate from 1926-1933.
Date: 1869/1947
Creator: Harry B. Hawes
Partner: Sam Rayburn House State Historical Site

Closing Lines from the Novel, "Eben Holden"

Description: Document with the closing lines from the book "Eben Holden" by Irving Bacheller, published in 1900. A handwritten note is at the bottom of the document with the words, "To Sam Rayburn, with deep affection--Gene Worley 10/17/49 Washington, D.C." Francis Eugene Worley was a democratic U.S. Representative from Texas who served in the House of Representatives from 1941 to 1950. Sam Rayburn "saw himself" in these closing lines from the book "Eben Holden." The text is black, printed on cream colored paper.
Date: 1941/1950
Creator: Bacheller, Irving
Partner: Sam Rayburn House State Historical Site

O. Henry

Description: Poem in honor of O Henry's death, first published by Mr. Christopher Morley in the "New York Evening Post", June 5, 1915.
Date: unknown
Creator: Morley, Christopher
Partner: Austin History Center, Austin Public Library

Poetic verse

Description: Poetic verse.
Date: unknown
Partner: The Dolph Briscoe Center for American History

[Der liefe Drud von Deiner hand]

Description: Poem by an unknown author regarding the joys of love and marriage. Poem is printed on a torn piece of paper.
Date: unknown
Partner: The Dolph Briscoe Center for American History

[Recueil de Chansons Nationales]

Description: Lyric sheet for "The Flag of Austerlitz and Arcole" to the tune of "La Sentinelle" and "La Parisienne," the national march, by Casimir DeLavigne.
Date: unknown
Partner: The Dolph Briscoe Center for American History

[Be Careful What You Say.]

Description: Clipping with a poem advising against speaking ill of others written by Sergeant Major Joseph A Hess. Fragment of a drawing and article on the reverse side.
Date: unknown
Creator: Sergeant Major Joseph A Hess
Partner: The Dolph Briscoe Center for American History

[Poem by Charles B. Moore]

Description: A poem by Charles Moore about soldiering during the Mexican-American War.
Date: unknown
Creator: Moore, Charles B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Poem of Texas Frontier]

Description: The author is on the Texas frontier alone, without his wife?, he enjoys the landscape and his neighbors. He speaks of the things he sees on a horse ride: herds of cattle, horses, eating steak and enjoying the rising moon and coming home.
Date: uuuu-10-11
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Poem of Legends]

Description: The poem mentions stabbing or shooting someone's wife, the husband feeling justified in his actions. The husband is charged with the crime and says the he did it, but he did not exaggerate it. On the other side, it talks of a legend and how it affects the people there. He talks of spurs. On October 12, a tree fell down and they tried to move it. He mentions a year ago on the 12th he was going through Memphis.
Date: uuuu-10-09
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Poem on Health]

Description: The author's health has returned. He mentions how fair the girls are, the members of church and how they hate each other. Brother Will was blaming Sister Sober because he didn't like her. On the flip side, he says that he has been there for a month, and he ate some bad wheat and then he got a fever. Afterwards he got better because his landlord took care of him. But he owes the doctor eight dollars. The author mentions hunting for deer to make new clothes: pants, a vest, and a coat. And with these clothes he will be able to handle any cold weather in Texas. He then goes to Paris and wants to meet up with Henry Moore and John. On the other side he mentions that he has gained weight and looks like a bear. His friend Browning's brother got a fever.
Date: unknown
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Kit Carson's Wife

Description: A poem about a "Kit Carson's Wife" who takes her horse and goes for a wild ride after her husband is killed.
Date: unknown
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Poem on Matrimony]

Description: Poem about matrimony, congratulating a new bride and her husband.
Date: unknown
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Sal is Dead]

Description: Poem of how Sal is dead and therefore people don't have to worry anymore.
Date: unknown
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Poem, c.1899]

Description: Poem from the C. B. Moore Collection. The poem is about a cat. The writer describes their companion and how they feel when coming home to their feline friend.
Date: January 1899
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Poem, undated]

Description: This is a poem from the Charles B. Moore Collection. The poem's subject is Bill Weaver who does not practice religion. The poet used the verses to discuss the gravity of sin on the human soul and how repentance would be a blessing for those who do not believe. It is undated and the poet is unidentified.
Date: unknown
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Poem]

Description: This is a document from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is an undated poem. The author is unidentified, but the handwriting appears to belong to Charles B. Moore. In this poem, the poet details his deep-seated affection for living in the prairie lands of Texas, but realizes he has given up much of his ties to family and friends because of his home in the country. He describes what he and his family would see as they traveled the prairie together; all the flora and fauna of the Texas pastureland.
Date: unknown
Creator: Moore, Charles B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

The History of Wonder

Description: A poem about a dog named Wonder who had an insatiable appetite and was killed for stealing food. The poem has twelve stanzas, each consisting of six lines.
Date: unknown
Creator: Sampson, Neal; Hornsby, Nat & George, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Poem and Notes by C. B. Moore, 1901]

Description: An envelope containing handwritten notes as well as a short poem by C. B. Moore. The envelope contains a label reading, "Moore jan01 Chambersville Tex".
Date: 1901
Creator: Moore, Charles B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
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