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[Bell County Ex Confederate Association Ledger]

Description: A ledger that chronicles Confederate veterans who settled in Bell County, Texas, after the Civil War. The ledger lists members by the state they enlisted in, and often includes notes on where a particular person fought, and may note a date of death.
Date: 1888
Creator: Bell County Ex Confederate Association
Partner: Lena Armstrong Public Library

[Dominic and Anna (Marek) Kramr family]

Description: Photograph of Dominic and Anna (Marek) Kramr family in Fayette Co., TX, ca. 1887-1890. Top row: Joe, Francis, John, Dominic Jr., Annie. Bottom row: Mary, Anna (mother), Rudolf, Dominic (father), Frank, Louie. The Kramr family moved to Texas from Moravia in 1887. All of the people are wearing dark clothing. There is a porch with wood and wire railing of a house in the background. See accession file for supporting documents.
Date: 1888
Partner: Fort Bend Museum

[Large two story home identified on back in Red pen as "Ryon Home".]

Description: Photograph of large two story home identified on back in Red pen as "Ryon Home." Identified by Michael Moore as J.H.P. Davis House before it was renovated in 1889. Home was located at site of present day Polly Ryon Hospital until it was moved to the George Ranch Historical Park (1977?). Yard is enclosed by a white picket fence with arched entryway. There are many young trees in the area outside the yard. Windmill is visible over the roof of the house. See 1972.093.117 for another view of the home. Image is mounted on a tan cardboard matte. Upper left corner of matte is broken off.
Date: 1888
Partner: Fort Bend Museum

[House identified on back in red pen as "Ryon House."]

Description: Photograph of house identified on back in red pen as "Ryon House." Identified by Michael Moore as the J.H.P. Davis House before renovations in 1889. Large two story wooden house. Unidentified man and woman are standing on the upper porch. Three women grouped together on lower porch in front of main door. Man and woman sitting on sills of bay window on first floor at right. African American man is standing behind a hedge in front of the right side entrance to the house. Image is mounted on a tan cardboard substrate. Image has a vertical break which begins 6 cm from the upper left corner and extends all the way through the image. There is a diagonal bend extending across the upper right corner beginning 9.5 cm from the upper right corner.
Date: 1888
Partner: Fort Bend Museum

[Bust image of J.H.P. Davis]

Description: Bust photograph (appears to be painted image) of J.H.P. Davis. He is wearing a dark coat, dark tie and a white shirt. His dark hair is parted on his left side. He has a mustache and short hairs under his lower lip. He is glancing to the left. Attached to a cardboard substrate. Looks as if it used to be in an oval frame.
Date: 1888
Partner: George Ranch Historical Park

[Bust portrait of Mary Moore "Polly" Ryon wearing a dark dress]

Description: Bust portrait of Mary Moore "Polly" Ryon taken by Justus Zahn, Galveston, Texas. Ryon's graying hair is parted down the center and is pulled back into a bun at the nape of her neck. She is wearing a dark dress that is shirred down the front. The high necked collar has two tiers of dark lace and is accented with a wide ribbon tied at center. The portrait is mounted on a tan cardboard substrate with gold trim around the edges. Back of photograph in pencil: "15911".
Date: [1888..1896]
Partner: George Ranch Historical Park

[Letter from C.I. Scofield to Judge David H. Scott, January 25, 1888]

Description: Letter from C.I. Scofield to D.H. Scott, dated January 5, 1888. On the letterhead of the Central American Mission. He discusses the Paris church's idea of merging with the Southern Presbyterian Church in Paris. Scofield says, "the Southern Presbyterian Church is the deadest, most thoroughly, hopelessly fossilized religious organization on this earth today."
Date: January 25, 1888
Creator: Scofield, C. I. (Cyrus Ingerson), 1843-1921.
Partner: Private Collection of Caroline R. Scrivner Richards