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Farmer's Cotton Gin

Description: Photograph of large metal building with water tower to the right and a wind mill to the rear. Bales of cotton are on the loading deck with men two men standing behind the bales. Label on photo states: "Farmers Cotton Gin, Poth , Texas - 1911, The first bales of cotton ginned".
Date: 1911
Partner: Wilson County Historical Society

Farmers Cotton Gin

Description: Photograph of large gin building. Baling equipment and three men are in the front of loading dock. Several men are standing on the loading dock. A water tower can be seen on the right side of the building and a windmill is visible in the background.
Date: [1911]
Creator: A. F. Manak
Partner: Wilson County Historical Society

[Wagons of cotton and James Alley]

Description: Postcard showing wagons of cotton and James Alley. Wagon on left has three men sitting on top of cotton. Two men standing in front of second wagon (from left). One man wearing suit and hat, the other dark pants, white shirt, suspenders, tie, and dark hat. BARNES BROS. building in background. Addressed to Mr. R.E. Duncan, Eagle Baker, Texas from Effie.
Date: May 14, 1912
Partner: Fort Bend Museum

[Men in cotton field]

Description: Black and white photograph (faded) of three men in cotton field, unidentified. Carruth Studio, Denton. Taken and collected by H.F.Browder, former county agent, Denton County.
Date: 1920~
Creator: Browder, H. F.
Partner: Courthouse-on-the-Square Museum

Santos Jaramillo in a Cotton Field 1940s

Description: Photograph of Santos Jaramillo standing in a cotton field in the 1940's.. In 1937, Santos Jaramillo started his Jaramillo Cattle hauling with a bob-tailed truck. He soon had a fleet of big cattle trailers, taking cattle to market from ranches all over South Texas, and even by ferry from St. Joseph Island. After WWII, the railroad’s agricultural customers began to see the advantages of shipping by truck. While shipping by rail was less expensive, trucking was faster. Without the regulations of having to stop to feed and water the cattle, the truckers took cattle from the ranch to market in half the
Date: unknown
Partner: Bee County Historical Commission