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[600 Block S. May - Dilley's Iron Foundry]

Description: Illinois-native George Mansfield Dilley, the prominent railroad-building contractor who played an instrumental role in the expansion of railroads throughout Texas and the South, established this foundry in 1873, one year after the railroad arrived in Palestine. The George M. Dilley & Son Foundry, located adjacent to the I&GN tracks, at one time contained more than ten buildings. The enterprise manufactured some farm equipment and machinery, but its primary output was gray iron and brass castings for Texas railroads. The elder Dilley moved to Dallas in the 1880s, but the foundry continued to be run by his son, George Edward Dilley – one of Palestine’s most prominent citizens of the late 19th century. G.E. Dilley continued operations at the foundry until his death in 1932; his son Clarence V. Dilley then took over until his own death five years later. In the mid-1930s, the plant had an average payroll of about twenty thousand dollars, for a workforce of twenty to twenty-five men. The foundry ceased operations in the late 1930s. All that remains today are the frame office building, the nearby brick brass furnace building, and a lengthy iron fence which borders the property and faces May Street (which local historians believe was named after G.M. Dilley’s infant daughter, Edna May Dilley, who died in 1872).
Date: 1875~
Partner: Palestine Public Library

[Three Men in Front of a Shop]

Description: Photograph of three men gathered together in front of a shop, which is displaying guitars, watches, and jewelry in the window behind them. The sign above the window says "Loans at 3%," and the sign below the window has the word "Bargains" in it.
Date: 19uu
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[The Crazy Hotel Lobby]

Description: This picture shows the First Crazy Hotel Lobby in 1913. The first Crazy Hotel was built in two sections; the first section, which contained this lobby, was built in 1912. The second section was added in 1914, and joined to the first with the two sections sharing this same sky-lighted lobby. A fire on March 15, 1925 destroyed the first Crazy Hotel along with all the other businesses in this block. The second Crazy Hotel, covering the entire city block, opened in 1927. It is now [2008] a retirement home. It was shut down--after much contention--in 2010.
Date: 1913
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[O'Neill Hotel - 313 Spring Street]

Description: Photo of the O'Neill Hotel and Coffee Shop, which was located at 313 Spring Street, Palestine. It was actually the third hotel to sit on the site. In 1873, following the coming of the railroad to town, the Laclede Hotel was built there, but was destroyed by fire in 1876. The following year, a Dr. Manning of Oakwood erected a brick building known as the International Hotel on that location. It was purchased in 1882 by Col. George Burkitt who turned over operations to Mrs. Emma Nolen. During her tenure, the property was known as the Nolen Hotel, but when she moved to St. Louis, Col. Burkitt himself took over the management. That building was razed in 1922 and the "new" O'Neill, maiden surname of Burkitt's Irish born mother, was constructed on the site. The O'Neill boasted not only hot and cold running water in its guest rooms, it was also equipped with an electric Otis elevator and a radio receiving set on the mezzanine for entertainment of the hotel's guests. When Texas Gov. Ross Sterling declared martial law in the East Texas Oil Fields and ordered the National Guard to take it over and shut-in all wells, the O'Neill became the staging center where the command cadre spent its first night "in the field." During the oil boom, the hotel was a favorite meeting place for oil operators, lease hounds and geologists. Among the famous early day oil men who slept under its roof and conducted business out of its rooms were H.L. Hunt, Harold Byrd, Jack Frost and other wildcatters. Those were the "glory days" of the venerable hotel, but not the end. The hotel was sold a number of times, and despite halfhearted attempts to restore it, the condition of the building went downhill. It was demolished ...
Date: 1960~
Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission

[Temple Opera House]

Description: Photo of the Temple Opera House which was located on the corner of Avenue A and Oak Street in downtown Palestine. As per the 1898-1899 city directory, the manager was a man named W.E. Swift. The building has since been destroyed.
Date: 1900~
Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission

[Temple Opera House]

Description: Photo of the Temple Opera House which was located on the corner of Avenue A and Oak Street in downtown Palestine. As per the 1898-1899 city directory, the manager was a man named W.E. Swift. The building has since been destroyed.
Date: 1900~
Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission