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[Building at Oxford University]

Description: Postcard of Oxford University. Wm. S. Blackshear was taking work under Dr. Kirsock Lake, the great English Professor of New Testament Greek (but his Eng. Course in N. Testament History) 1922-23 Photo is from the William Blackshear collection, which was donated to the Palestine Public Library.
Date: 1923
Partner: Palestine Public Library

[President's Home at Bishop College, Marshall]

Description: The president's home at Bishop College in Marshall was formerly an antebellum plantation mansion called Wyalucing, located on a hilltop at the western end of Burleson Street. Constructed c1850, it was the home of the Holcombe family that moved to Marshall from Tennessee. A daughter, Lucy Petway Holcombe (1832-1899), married Col. Francis Wilkinson Pickens in the house. A lawyer and secessionist, he first became United States Ambassador to Russia and later the Confederate governor of South Carolina. Also a staunch supportor of the Southern cause, Mrs. Pickens was called "Lady Lucy, Queen of the Confederacy." Her likeness appears on certain Confederate currency, the only woman's image to do so. A historic marker at the corner of Hwy 80 and Bishop St. recognizes her. Wyalucing became the original building and centerpiece of Bishop College, which was established in 1881. Bishop relocated to Dallas in 1961. The house was razed during the 1970's to make way for a federal housing project.
Date: unknown
Partner: Marshall Public Library

Men Working at Clifton Lutheran College

Description: 10 workers in front of Clifton College, some holding tools and some resting on lumber. The men standing in front of the building are, left to right, Ole Knudson, Frederick Hogeroll, Aslak O Seljos, Torger T Hogeroll, Dan Nelson, N Jacob Nelson and Hendrick Dahl.
Date: 1900
Partner: Bosque County Historical Commission

[BishopCollege Dormitory, Marshall]

Description: Marston Hall, located on the historic Bishop College campus in Marshall, was a dormitory for college men. It was built between 1909 and 1915 on the site of an older dormitory, also called Marston Hall. The campus no longer exists. It was a Baptist college for African-Americans. In the picture, a reservoir is in the foreground. To the left of the building is a small bell tower.
Date: unknown
Partner: Marshall Public Library

[Dr. Joseph J. Rhoads, President of Bishop College]

Description: Dr. Joseph J. Rhoads was an educator, administrator, and advocate for civil rights in education who completed his career as the first African-American president of Bishop College in Marshall. He was born in 1890 in Marshall, and was educated there. He received his first degree from Bishop College; his second degree from the University of Michigan; and a Lit. D. degree from Bishop College. He also did graduate work at Yale University, receiving a scholarship there. He held numerous positions as teacher and school administrator from Texas to Alabama before being appointed to the presidency of Bishop in 1929. He led Bishop to its first accreditation by the Texas Dept. of Education and other major accrediting associations. During his tenure, Dr. Rhoads discontinued Bishop's high school department, opened a junior college campus in Dallas, and affiliated with the United Negro College Fund. He also organized the Lacy Kirk Williams Ministers' Institute, a short-term training center for inservice ministers and laity. He consistently advocated for racial equality in education through the offices he held in numerous organizations. Dr. Rhoads died in 1951, and was buried in the McJohnson Cemetery in Marshall.
Date: unknown
Partner: Marshall Public Library

[C. H. and Mrs. Maxon, Bishop College, Marshall]

Description: C. H. Maxon was the fifth president of Bishop College in Marshall during the early years of the twentieth century. He is pictured with Mrs. Maxon. He was appointed by the American Baptist Home Missionary Society that founded the college. As all of the first presidents, he was a white man administering a school for African-American students. Bishop College received its first African-American president in 1929 with the appointment of Dr. J. J. Rhoads.
Date: unknown
Partner: Marshall Public Library

[Bishop College Teachers' Cottage, Marshall]

Description: A bungalow at Bishop College, Marshall, provided housing for instructors in the early years of the school's history. A historic Baptist college for African-Americans, Bishop was established in 1881. In 1961 it was relocated to Dallas. Falling upon hard times, the college closed in 1988. None of the original buildings of the Marshall campus remain.
Date: unknown
Partner: Marshall Public Library

[Bishop College Classroom Building, Marshall]

Description: This was a temporary classroom building in the early years of Bishop College in Marshall. The college was established as a Baptist institution for African-Americans in 1881. The campus relocated to Dallas in 1961. Bishop closed in 1988. None of the original Marshall campus remains.
Date: unknown
Partner: Marshall Public Library

[Bishop College Dormitory, Marshall]

Description: Marston Hall, located on the historic Bishop College campus in Marshall, was a dormitory for college men. It was built between 1909 and 1915 on the site of an older dormitory, also called Marston Hall. The campus buildings no longer exist. Bishop was established in 1881 as a Baptist college for African-Americans. In 1961 the campus relocated to Dallas. Eventually Bishop fell upon hard times and closed in 1988. The large building at right shows the entrance toward the campus. A reservoir surrounded by planting beds is at center. To the left is a small bell tower. In the distance is a small frame building used as a schoolroom.
Date: unknown
Partner: Marshall Public Library