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Sacred Heart Academy Music Hall

Description: Photograph of Sacred Heart Academy Music Hall. The building is three stories high and has three windows on each level. On the third floor middle window is a statue of a man. There is a porch on the first and second level. In the foreground is a wrought iron fence. Behind the fence there are plants and other shrubbery. On the bottom of the photograph, "Sacred Heart Academy Hallettsville Texas" is written.
Date: unknown
Partner: Friench Simpson Memorial Library

Sacred Heart Academy

Description: Photograph of Sacred Heart Academy. The building is three stories tall and has trees surrounding it on all sides. In the foreground is a road that has a wooden fence on both sides. There are three windows on each level of the house facing the road.
Date: unknown
Partner: Friench Simpson Memorial Library

Live Oak School

Description: Portrait of Live Oak School. The building has windows on both sides of the entrance and is made of brick. In the foreground is a dirt road.
Date: unknown
Creator: Studer Photo
Partner: Friench Simpson Memorial Library

[Central High School, Marshall]

Description: Central High School was located on a hill at the conjunction of Railroad Ave. (now Alamo), Border St. (now Travis), and Fannin St in Marshall. It was built by Prof. H. B. Pemberton, using his own funds which were repaid by donations. It was the first public school for African-Americans in the city. In the beginning all grade levels were there. When elementary schools were built, those grades moved and Central became a high school. Later the high school moved to a new campus on Wiley Ave. (Rosborough Springs Rd.) The old building was torn down and the hill leveled. Today a historic marker stands on the site.
Date: unknown
Partner: Marshall Public Library

[Park School, Marshall]

Description: Park School was an early elementary school for African-American children in Marshall. It was located at 600 Park Street. In 1902, local educator J. H. Moore was authorized by the school board to organize an elementary school for northwest Marshall. Classes began in the Odd Fellows Hall on West Grand Ave. They moved to the brick building on Park St. on Jan. 5, 1903. Moore was principal there for 22 years and was succeeded by L. E. Thompson. During Thompson's leadership, two additional classrooms, an auditorium, and four more rooms were added. P. E. Moon became the third principal in 1950, remaining there until the school was closed in 1954. A new campus named for J. H. Moore replaced Park Elementary, and the old campus no longer exists.
Date: unknown
Partner: Marshall Public Library

[Marshall University, Marshall]

Description: Marshall University was one of Marshall's earliest schools. It was authorized by Sam Houston in 1842. In 1843 Peter Whetstone, founder of Marshall, gave ten acres of land for educational purposes. The plot is located on the corner of W. Houston and College St., where Marshall Junior High School stands today. The building shown in the picture was contracted in 1851. It served the community until 1910, when it closed its doors. The school was never a true university. It served educational needs of more youthful boys and girls. A historical marker on the campus recognizes the school's history and contributions.
Date: unknown
Partner: Marshall Public Library

[Pemberton High School, Marshall]

Description: Students are gathered in the courtyard in front of Pemberton High School in Marshall. The school was traditionally African-American before integration. In 1970 MISD merged grades 10-12 with Marshall High School. Pemberton then housed the ninth grade until 1988, when the ninth grade went to Marshall High School. The campus was then sold to Wiley College. This photo is from the 1964-65 yearbook.
Date: unknown
Partner: Marshall Public Library

[Central School, Marshall]

Description: Central School was the first public school in Harrison County for African-American children. It was located on a hill bounded by Railroad Ave. (now Alamo), Border St. (now Travis), and Fannin St. Founded by H. B. Pemberton, who was also its first principal, the school was later named for him. In early years the campus housed all grades; but when elementary schools were built, Central/Pemberton became a high school. When the school moved across town to a new site, the old buildings were razed and the hill levelled. A historical marker now commemorates the school.
Date: unknown
Partner: Marshall Public Library

[Marshall University, Marshall]

Description: Marshall University was one of Marshall's earliest schools. It was authorized by Sam Houston in 1842. In 1843 Peter Whetstone, founder of Marshall, gave ten acres of land for educational purposes. The plot is located on the corner of W. Houston and College St. where Marshall Junior High School stands today. The building shown in the picture was contracted in 1851. It served the community until 1910, when it closed its doors. The school was never a true university. It served educational needs of more youthful boys and girls. A historical marker on the campus recognizes the school's history and contributions.
Date: unknown
Partner: Marshall Public Library