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Old Lincoln County Courthouse

Description: Photograph of two individuals identified as George W. Coe and Nan Hillary Harrison standing by the old Lincoln County courthouse, which was turned into a museum. Several handwritten notes on the back read: "Old Lincoln County [C]ourt House Recentl[y] [R]estored as a Museum [by] the Pioneers of Linco[ln C]ounty", "Billy the Kid", "Georgia Redfield", and "Lincoln Co. Courthse. made into museum."
Date: unknown
Partner: Cattle Raisers Museum

[Third Anderson County Courthouse]

Description: In 1885, Palestine, like most of the country, was in the midst of a depression, complicated by a series of railroad strikes, so there was little new construction. However, Anderson County had to have a new courthouse because the old one was literally falling down. And they were determined to have the finest and most up-to-date building that could be constructed. The Architect that was hired was William C. Dodson of Waco and building commenced in June of 1885 after demolition was completed on the old building. It was completed in May 1886 at a cost of $40,000 and was indeed impressive looking with it's tall three story dome and clocktower. The life of the building was cut short when a couple of incendiaries set fire to it on the night of January 6, 1913, in order to destroy evidence against one of them. The plan failed because the actual court records were housed in fireproof rooms, which were not damaged.
Date: 1885~
Partner: Palestine Public Library

[Third Anderson County Courthouse]

Description: In 1885, Palestine, like most of the country, was in the midst of a depression, complicated by a series of railroad strikes, so there was little new construction. However, Anderson County had to have a new courthouse because the old one was literally falling down. And they were determined to have the finest and most up-to-date building that could be constructed. The Architect that was hired was William C. Dodson of Waco and building commenced in June of 1885 after demolition was completed on the old building. It was completed in May 1886 at a cost of $40,000 and was indeed impressive looking with it's tall three story dome and clocktower. The life of the building was cut short when a couple of incendiaries set fire to it on the night of January 6, 1913, in order to destroy evidence against one of them. The plan failed because the actual court records were housed in fireproof rooms, which were not damaged.
Date: unknown
Partner: Anderson County Historical Commission

[Third Anderson County Courthouse]

Description: In 1885, Palestine, like most of the country, was in the midst of a depression, complicated by a series of railroad strikes, so there was little new construction. However, Anderson County had to have a new courthouse because the old one was literally falling down. And they were determined to have the finest and most up-to-date building that could be constructed. The Architect that was hired was William C. Dodson of Waco and building commenced in June of 1885 after demolition was completed on the old building. It was completed in May 1886 at a cost of $40,000 and was indeed impressive looking with it's tall three story dome and clocktower. The life of the building was cut short when a couple of incendiaries set fire to it on the night of January 6, 1913, in order to destroy evidence against one of them. The plan failed because the actual court records were housed in fireproof rooms, which were not damaged.
Date: [1885..1916]
Partner: Palestine Public Library

Old Cora Courthouse, Historic Plaque

Description: Old Cora Courthouse. Soon after the creation of Comanche County in 1856, the town of Cora (10 Mi. SE) was platted to serve as the county seat. The courthouse in Cora, typical of many early Texas Courthouses, was a 12'7" x 12'10", one room, squared log structure. It served the county until the seat of government was moved to Comanche in 1859. The "Old Cora" courthouse was incorporated into a house built about 1880 and has been moved several times over the years. It stands as a reminder of the now-extinct town of Cora and of early Texas Courthouse architecure.
Date: August 1, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries