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Milam County Calaboose sign

Description: Photograph of a sign outside the Milam County Calaboose. It reads: "Calaboose. May 16, 1892. A bid to build the calaboose was accepted by the Cameron City Council from a company called Westmoreland and Mullinax for $262.50. Calaboose was to be accepted by Major A.J. Lewis and City Marshall R. L. Batte. Mayor Lewis later became Sheriff of Milam County. The Calaboose is twenty feet long, ten feet wide and twelve feet high. Thick wooden walls are formed by the placement of two-by-four-inch timbers flat on top of each other. The floor is of similar construction. The two-by-fours are placed edgewise forming a four-inch wall. There is a door at each end and two windows, one on each side of the building in both cells. The windows have two sets of iron bars - a rounded set of twelve that is built into the facing and a flat set of nine attached on the inside. To keep out the rain and also to help keep prisoners in, wooden shutters were put on the outside. There are iron bars on each shutter which served as a lock."
Date: October 8, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Historic plaque, Milam County Jail of 1895

Description: Photograph of a historic plaque in Cameron, Texas. It reads: "Milam County Jail of 1895. When the 1875 Milam County Jailhouse grew too crowded in the 1890s, it was removed to make room for larger facilities. In March 1895, the Milam County Commissioners awarded a contract to the Pauly Jail Building and Manufacturing Company of St. Louis, Missouri, for the construction of a larger prison. The company furnished all supplies, including St. Louis pressed bricks. County Judge Sam Streetman, who later served on the Texas Supreme Court, approved the contract, although he had preferred the use of local building materials. This structure, designed with Romanesque revival features and stone detailing above the windows, had three main floors and a "hanging tower" equipped with a trap door. The tower was never used for executions because most hangings took place outdoors. The first floor had ten rooms, three for storage and the remainder serving as a residence for the sheriff and his family. The second and third stories consisted of cell blocks for prisoners. In 1975 a new county jail was constructed, and the Commissioners Court turned this facility over to the Milam County Historical Commission. After renovation, it was opened as a museum in 1978. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1978"
Date: October 8, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Ben Milam statue, Milam County Courthouse grounds

Description: Photograph of the base of a statue of Ben Milam on the grounds of the Milam County Courthouse. It says, "Who will follow Old Ben Milam into San Antonio. Erected by the state of Texas 1936 with funds appropriated by the Federal Government to commemorate one hundred years of Texas independence."
Date: October 8, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Ben Milam statue, Milam County Courthouse grounds

Description: Photograph of a statue of Ben Milam on the grounds of the Milam County Courthouse, viewed from the side. He raises his hat in his right hand. The base of the statue reads, "Benjamin Rush Milam participated in the capture of Goliad October ninth, 1835, was killed in San Antonio, December seventh 1835 while commanding the Texas forces which later captured the town."
Date: October 8, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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