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[An Aerial View of Downtown Mineral Wells in 1954]

Description: This is a picture of an aerial view of downtown Mineral Wells (taken from the Ft. Worth Star-Telegram, January 1954)at about South Oak Avenue, and looking north-northeast. Some of the buildings identifiable in the picture no longer exist. The Damron Hotel, at the middle left of the picture, burned in 1975. The Oxford Hotel/First National Bank building, one block east [right] of the Damron, near the center of the picture, burned in 1983. It has been replaced by Lynch Plaza. The Hexagon Hotel, in the upper left corner of the picture, (north and above the Crazy) was demolished in 1959. The Convention Center behind the Hexagon was demolished in 1976. Landmarks still standing are: The 13-story (including a Roof Garden) Baker Hotel, dominating the upper right of the picture; The Crazy Hotel (now [2003] a retirement home) at the upper left of the picture; and the old Post Office in the upper middle of the picture (between the Baker and Crazy Hotels), which now [2003] houses the Woman's Club. The building across the street and to the south (this side of the Baker) was demolished to make room for the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, which in turn was replaced by The First State Bank.
Date: 1954
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

"Where the Famous Crystals Are Made"

Description: This is a photograph of a building with a sign that says, "Famous Mineral Wells Crystal Plant." There is a hill, covered in trees, behind the building. Writing at the bottom of the image reads: "Where Famous Crystals Are Made." Ed Dismuke, a druggist from Waco, came to Mineral Wells for his health after his family physician told him he only had a "short time" to live. After miraculously regaining his health, which he credited to the mineral waters of his new hometown, he sold water by the drink at the Damron Hotel, later opening his own company, The Famous Water Company. He also opened The Famous Mineral Crystal Plant on the east side of Lake Pinto in partnership with local banker Cicero Smith. The two also organized The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway with its two gasoline-powered "dinky cars" named "Esther" and "Susie" after Smith's daughters. This is a picture of the plant where Famous Crystals, labeled "Pronto Lax" were made. Dismuke had outlived the doctors who had told him he only had a short time to live when he died at the age of ninety-four.
Date: 1905?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells

Description: Photograph of the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells, built 1929 by architects Wyatt C. Hendrick and Co. Architects. It has been vacant since 1972. The building is at least twelve stories tall.
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Location Info:
Partner: UNT Libraries

[An Old Map of Mineral Wells]

Description: An early cadastral map of Mineral Wells with the original street names, it also shows the unusual topography of the surrounding mountains. The streets were paved in 1914, and the street names were changed January 1,1920.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]

Description: This photograph shows a celebrity car in the "Time Was" Bicentennial (celebrating the United States Bicentennial) parade, held April 4, 1976. The passengers riding in the back seat of the 1976 Cadillac El Dorado convertible are The Mayor of Mineral Wells, Ellis White, and his wife, Janie. The picture was taken at the intersection of Oak Street (Highway 281) and Hubbard Avenue (Highway 180) in downtown Mineral Wells. The car is moving south on Oak Street, with the Baker Hotel one block east in background. The camera that took the picture is facing east-northeast.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Bicentennial Parade in Mineral Wells]

Description: The Rotary Club featured a float during "Time Was" Bicentennial (celebrating the United States Bi-Centennial) parade in downtown Mineral Wells, on April 4, 1976. It is moving south on Oak Avenue at the intersection of Oak and Hubbard Streets. Riders on the float depict "flappers" and a golfer of the "Roaring Twenties", dancing to jazz music.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Casino

Description: A (gambling) Casino at Elmhurst Park was located in southwest Mineral Wells, Texas, at the turn of the twentieth century. The structure was a large stucco building facing Elmhurst Lake (created by a dam on Pollard Creek) in the foreground. The lake was sometimes referred to as "Pollard Lake." Elmhurst Park was served by the Mineral Wells Electric Railroad (Street Car), with whom it seemed to have had a symbiotic relationship; both came into existence about 1903, and both went out of business about 1913.
Date: 1907/1913?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[A Parade in Mineral Wells on North Oak Avenue]

Description: The Chamber of Commerce float, with the Parade Princess, greets visitors in the 1936 Centennial Parade in Mineral Wells,Texas. It is shown proceeding along the 200 block of North Oak Avenue. Businesses in photograph include, (bunting-festooned) Perry Brothers 5-10-and 25-cent store, City Bakery, and (to the left) part of Duke & Ayers 5-& 10-cent store. Angle-parked automobiles and spectators line the street.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[A View of Mineral Wells] 1886

Description: An oval inset of Mineral Wells as it appeared in 1886. The photograph on which it is overlaid was made in approximately 1925. Above, and right of the overlay, is the Lamar Bath House and Hotel complex, the current site of the Baker Hotel. An incomplete text under the picture compares Mineral Wells to other worldwide mineral water resort cities.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[Downtown Mineral Wells, Texas : January 11, 1919]

Description: Downtown Mineral Wells, Texas is shown here, as taken on January 11, 1919. The first Crazy Hotel is the prominent building in the right middle portion of the picture. The first Roman Catholic Church can be seen on the side of West Mountain in the upper middle of the picture and the old High School, the "Little Rock School", and the West Ward School are at the base of West Mountain in the far upper left part of the picture. The Dr. A.W. Thompson home is at the foot of East Mountain in the lower middle foreground of the picture. The wide street in the left middle of the picture is NW 2nd Street, looking west. The First Presbyterian Church is the domed building on the right of 2nd Street at NW 4th Avenue, near the far end of NW 2nd Street.
Date: January 11, 1919
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 3 of 3: The East Side of the Construction]

Description: This series of photographs of the construction of Mineral Wells Savings and Loan was taken in 1975. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975, to make room for the Savings and Loan. D.M. Howard was the first of five brothers to arrive from North Carolina. He later sent for his other brothers to establish the Howard Brothers Department Stores complex in the early 1900's. The Baker Hotel, directly across E. Hubbard north of the Savings and Loan, is seen to the left of the picture. Across SE 1st Street, to the south, were the Piggly Wiggly Grocery store (at the site of Mineral Wells' first Post Office) and the S & H Green Stamp store. The First State Bank now [2012] occupies this entire city block.
Date: 1975
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Construction Site of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, 2 of 3: A Piggy Wiggly Is in the Background]

Description: The construction of the Mineral Wells Savings and Loan, at 101 SE 1st Avenue in 1975, was documented in this series of photographs. The Howard Building, the first of the complex of Howard Brothers Department Stores, had been built on this location in the early 1900's. Demolition of the Howard Building began March 17, 1975, to make room for the Savings and Loan. The Piggly Wiggly Grocery Store (at the site of Mineral Wells' first Post Office) and the Green Stamp Store are visible across SE 1st Avenue, south of the Savings and Loan. The new First State State currently covers the entire city block at this location.
Date: 1975
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

View of Mineral Wells From East Mountain Showing Crazy Hotel & Nazareth Hospital

Description: A view of Mineral Wells from East Mountain, looking West-Northwest is shown here. The Crazy Hotel is visible in the near-left part of the picture, and the Nazareth Hospital in the middle-left, a block Northwest of the Crazy The Norwood Clinic (with its stately white columns), a block northeast of the Nazareth, is located near the center of the picture.
Date: 1930?/1939?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

"Welcome to Crazy Park"

Description: The Gibson Well Company purchased the Sangura-Sprudel property in 1908 for the sum of $30,000. It was to be operated as the Gibson Well property thereafter. An unnamed company shipped twenty-five carloads of water to an equally anonymous firm in Chicago in March of that year. The Gibson Well, Pavilion, and Park property covered the entire block, bordered by NW 2nd and 3rd Avenues and NW 6th and 7th Streets. The Gibson Well buildings were on the north side of the block, and the Crazy Water Well Company Bottling Plant was across NW 2nd Avenue--to the east. The Crazy Well Company maintained ambitions to build a large plant to the north of the Gibson Block, at 300 NW 7th Street, in 1921. Two buildings remained of the Gibson Well property in the 1920's, but the land was still used as a park. 1927 saw the operation of the Crazy Hotel (It was reputed to be the "Center of Everything in Mineral Wells") with its park at 300 NW 6th Street. Hence, the name of the park in the title. The property now [2008] belongs to, and is occupied by, the First Christian Church.
Date: 1938
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[Dr. J.H. McCracken Home, 3 of 3: Different View]

Description: The Dr. J.H. McCracken home, built in 1904 at 516 West Hubbard, and restored by Gil Hull. Joseph Hill McCracken was born on a farm near Springtown, Texas, October 1, 1867. He graduated from the University of Tennessee Medical School in 1891, and returned to Texas. He married Marie Sue Wilson, the daughter of Oliver Loving's youngest daughter, Margaret on October 15, 1895. He was elected President of the Texas Medical Association in 1911 and practiced medicine in Mineral Wells for over fifty years. He frequently laughed about having "delivered babies of babies of babies." Dr. McCracken died in March of 1954, and his wife died in November of 1955. Both are buried in Mineral Wells' Woodland Park Cemetery. Professor John N. McCracken, who established the Mineral Wells College directly across the street west of the McCracken home, is believed to be Dr. McCracken's father. [For details of the Mineral Wells College, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School, Texas"]
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[Photograph of House]

Description: Photograph of a house, believed to be in Mineral Wells, Texas. The mat features the type: "A Photographic Souvenir from Mineral Wells, the Great Health and Pleasure Resort of Texas." Someone can be seen standing on the porch.
Date: unknown
Partner: Private Collection of T. B. Willis

Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells, detail of doorway

Description: Photograph of the doorway to the Baker Hotel in Mineral Wells, Texas. There are double doors in white with glass windows. The door on the left has a sign warning against trespassing. The hotel was built in 1929 by architects Wyatt C. Hendrick and Co. Architects. It has been vacant since 1972.
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Location Info:
Partner: UNT Libraries