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[Anderson Campground - Brushy Creek Arbor]

Description: This is a photo of the Anderson County Campground. There is a Texas Historical Commission Marker at the site, which was dedicated on September 6, 1981. That same day a National Register of Historic Places designation was also given to the site. Commonly called the Brushy Creek Arbor, Anderson Campground has a long and well known history. During the 1850's, the nearby area was settled with families, most of whom had come from a place called Brushy Creek, which was in Anderson County, South Carolina. By the 1870's a religious campground was constructed, with water provided from a nearby Artesian spring. Families came and stayed for days, bringing their own food, bedding, and supplies. Sermons were preached several times a day. Religious camp meetings were popular in the late 1800's and early 1900's, although there are few visible signs remaining. This arbor is one of the few that has survived intact for over 130 years. Both the church associated with it, Brushy Creek United Methodist, and the arbor itself have changed very little. The total area covers 5.6 acres. Although the last camp meetings were held in the 1930's, the arbor continued to be used for weeklong summer revivals into the 1950's. On the first Sunday of each September, a large homecoming of descendants of the early Brushy Creek families is held at the arbor. A program, business meeting, and meal are part of the agenda, plus a guest speaker and recognition of families. the annual homecoming is a popular, well-attended event. Many descendants still live in the county.
Date: 1950~
Partner: Palestine Public Library

[Rectory at Freeport]

Description: (back of photo) The Rectory at Freeport. The Church which was torn down was on the vacant lot next to it. The concrete box like house in the rear is the town calaboose. Photo is from the William Blackshear collection, which was donated to the Palestine Public Library.
Date: unknown
Partner: Palestine Public Library

First Christian Church, Richardson, Texas

Description: Wooden frame church, white clapboard siding. The middle section of the front (gable end) entends forward to form an entrance and upward to form a [bell?] tower. The double entrance door is covered with a decorative braced awning with a closed dormer. A sign over the door reads "First Christian Church." The roof is shingled, maybe wooden. A signpost is at the right edge of the picture, with the name of the church and the pastor's name. To the left of the main building is a lower building/annex with multiple doors and a side porch supported by posts. Trees are to the right and left of the mail building. Both buildings are surrounded by shrubs or low plants. The area is front of the building is paved. This photograph was probably taken at the location at Greenville Ave. and Polk St., Richardson, Texas. The church relocated to 601 E Main in April, 1958.
Date: 1940/1958
Partner: Richardson Public Library

[Centenary Methodist Church - Palestine]

Description: The Centenary Methodist Church is one of 13 historic religious buildings identified in the survey. With its pointed, arched openings and corner towers, this institutional building is one of the city’s best examples of the Gothic Revival style, especially as interpreted on ecclesiastical buildings. The construction of massive additions on the north side have somewhat compromised the historic character but the building retains sufficient integrity to be recognizable to its period of significance. There has been an active Methodist presence in Palestine since about 1850. At that time the only local congregation met in Bascom’s Chapel, an extant building located at 812 N. Mallard, which has since been converted into a private residence. During the early 20th century the original congregation split, with some members establishing this church, the Centenary Methodist Church, and some founding Grace United Methodist Church, located just north of downtown. Locally prominent contractor John H. Gaught constructed the sanctuary of this church in 1910-11. It was renamed the First Methodist Episcopal church by the mid-1920s, and today is known as the First United Methodist church. This photo was taken when the windows could be swiveled open to catch air during the warm months of the year.
Date: 1900~
Partner: Palestine Public Library

[Congregational Church - Palestine]

Description: The Centenary Methodist Church is one of 13 historic religious buildings identified in the survey. With its pointed, arched openings and corner towers, this institutional building is one of the city’s best examples of the Gothic Revival style, especially as interpreted on ecclesiastical buildings. The construction of massive additions on the north side have somewhat compromised the historic character but the building retains sufficient integrity to be recognizable to its period of significance. There has been an active Methodist presence in Palestine since about 1850. At that time the only local congregation met in Bascom’s Chapel, an extant building located at 812 N. Mallard, which has since been converted into a private residence. During the early 20th century the original congregation split, with some members establishing this church, the Centenary Methodist Church, and some founding Grace United Methodist Church, located just north of downtown. Locally prominent contractor John H. Gaught constructed the sanctuary of this church in 1910-11. It was renamed the First Methodist Episcopal church by the mid-1920s, and today is known as the First United Methodist church.
Date: 1912~
Partner: Palestine Public Library