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Runnels County Courthouse, plaque

Description: "Runnels County Courthouse, constructed here 1888-89, after hotly-contested battle with Runnels City for County Seat. (County had been organized 1880.) Structures stands on one of the largest courthouse squares in Texas - 2 city blocks. Plot set aside prior to town lot sale by Sante Fe Railroad, June 29, 1886. In 1941, extensive remodeling modernized building. Two wings were added and old quarry (South of town on Colorado River) was opened to provide matching stone. Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 1967."
Date: August 1, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Charles H. Noyes Monument, Runnels County, plaque

Description: Photograph of the Charles H. Noyes monument plaque, located on the Runnels County Courthouse grounds. It says, "Charles H. Noyes (1896-1917). Charles H. Noyes, 21, died when his horse fell while rounding up cattle on the Noyes Ranch. His father and mother, Gus and Lula Noyes, erected monument in 1919 as a tribute to their son and all Texas cowboys. Pompeo Coppin of Chicago studied horses two years before sculpting statue."
Date: August 1, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

[Strickling Town Post in Front of Fenced Grassy Area]

Description: Slide of a signpost demarcating the site of Strickling, Texas. The post is on the far left, in front of a wire and wood fence that has been placed among tall, unkempt grasses. Small yellow inflections of color from the foliage can be seen behind it, with trees of varying heights in the very back. On the actual signpost, a line of text follows an emblem of the state of Texas, and it reads: "Site of town of Strickling -- Once a busy rural community. Named for Mrs. Martha (Webster) Strickling, who settled here in 1853 with husband Marmaduke. As child, she survived killing of some 30 settlers in infamous Webster massacre near Leander, and months of indian captivity. Post office opened here, 1857. And Strickling became a mail terminal and stage stop. Tons of lumber and buffalo hides were hauled through here. The town had a school, churches, a doctor's office, and stores. Strickling gradually declined when bypassed by the railroad, 1882. Only the cemetery remains. (1970)"
Date: 1970~
Partner: Burnet County Historical Commission

[Bell, Plaque, and Flower Vases on Stone Construction]

Description: Slide of a medium-sized plaque placed within a type of stone altar. Mounted on top is a black bell with a supporting structure holding it upright. Two pots flank either side, both of which have a register of decorative schema running along their width. "Elephant ear" plants have been placed inside them. The actual plaque has an inscription of text in golden relief. It reads: "This property has been placed on the National Register of Historical Places by the United States Department of the Interior."
Date: unknown
Partner: Burnet County Historical Commission

[Black's Fort Stone Slab in Grassy Field]

Description: Slide of a pointed stone slab placed in the middle of an unkempt field of grass, amidst red and yellow flowers. An aged wooden fence can be seen in the back, creating a boundary between the stone and a larger field in the background. The slab bears an inscription just beneath a small relief of a five-pointed slab within a wreath. It reads: "Black's Fort - Built as a defense against the Indians in 1855 by William Black - 1815 - - 1907 - on land owned by him. In the stockade, constructed of cedar logs, sentries were kept on guard on moonlight nights * Guns and ammunition for public use were kept here * Abandoned in 1868."
Date: unknown
Partner: Burnet County Historical Commission

Historic Plaque, Balinger

Description: Photograph of a historic plaque. It reads: "Ballinger originally called Hutchins City. Promoted by Sante Fe Rwy. Named for Judge William Pitt Ballinger (1825-1888), railroad attorney and townsite official. Distinguished Texas Statesman, Veteran of the Mexican War. In the Civil War helped establish defenses of Galveston, served as Confederate receiver of enemy aliens' property, was sent to negotiate peace for Texas. Ballinger is County Seat, and farm-ranch center. INdustries include dairying, meat products, leather goods manufacturing. Has annual rodeo, livestock and quarterhorse shows. (1965)"
Date: August 1, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

[Stone Slab Near Water]

Description: Color slide of a stone slab on a grassy hill, a short distance away from a body of water. The slab is center right, and bears an inscription just below a high relief wreath enclosing a five-pointed star. The inscription reads: "Site of A settlement made in 1851 by 20 Mormon families under the leadership of Lyman Wight 1796-1858 * * Here they built homes, lumber mills, and shops for the manufacture of furniture * Abandoned in 1853" A smaller line of text below reads: "Erected by the State of Texas 1936" Accompanying information names the settlement Mormon Mill.
Date: 1936/..
Partner: Burnet County Historical Commission

SHSC Historical Marker Central National Road 1844

Description: Photograph of an SHSC (State Historical Survey Committee) marker commemorating the Central National Road started by the Republic of Texas in 1844. The road beagan at the mouth of the Elm Fork of the Trinity River, passed through Milam County and downtown Paris, Texas, where this marker is placed at Union Station west of the downtown area. Text of the marker reads: "Central National Road of the Republic of Texas. Designed as a military highway, intended to make linkage with United States military road built to the north of the Red River in the 1820's. This was part of the national effort of Republic of Texas to open a good road system. Congress in 1839 passed a bill for a road east from Washington-on-the-Brazos to the Sabine River; 1841 legislation called for a road from the Nueces to the Red River and another from Austin to Santa Fe, New Mexico. The Central National Road was created in 1844, to reach from mouth of the Elm Fork on the Trinity to Kiomatia Crossing on the Red. It went down a main street in Paris, which was founded in 1844; near its south end was the 1841 John Neely Bryan home, around which the city of Dallas originated. Major George W. Stell surveyed the 130-mile route. Plans called for a road 30 feet wide and a clear of tree stumps over 12 inches high. For each mile of road built (including bridges), grants of 160 acres of public lands were offered. Commissioners were Roland W. Box, Harrison county; James Bradshaw, Nacogdoches County; William M. Williams and Jason Wilson, Lamar County; John Yeary, Fannin County. The route is roughly followed by later roads. (1968)"
Date: November 13, 2008
Creator: Bell, Jim
Partner: Private Collection of Jim Bell

[Mount Horeb Lodge]

Description: Slide of a long, presumably two-story, structure known as Mount Horeb Lodge. An inclined, metal roofing sits atop the blue-tinted stone structure with multiple, sequential double-hung windows. On the far right, a garage-type entry can be seen, fully opened. A narrow, dirt path leads up to a door on the far left of the structure. The State Historical Survey Committee has placed its name on the signpost in the foreground, inscribed in small print around the circle surrounding an image of the state of Texas. The line of text that follows reads: "Mount Horeb Lodge - Chartered Jan. 21, 1854; met in log schoolhouse. Erected own lodge hall 1856 on land given by grand master Sam Mather and B. K. Stewart, first floor used as church and school. A fire in 1915 razed hall. Lodge rebuilt here 1916 on land given by G. T. and W. J. Williams. (1967)"
Date: unknown
Partner: Burnet County Historical Commission

[Photograph of XXI Club]

Description: Photograph of XXI Club in Denison, Texas. There is a short, brick fence behind the historical marker. In the background, there are residential houses.
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[Photograph of Miller's Spring]

Description: Photograph of Miller's Spring to Denison, Texas. The spring can be partially seen in the right of the picture with a decorative rock wall along the edge of the spring. Trees and houses can be seen in the background.
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[Bill Mack with a woman]

Description: Photograph of Bill Mack and a woman standing in front of a plaque outside. The plaque tells the history of WBAP-TV Channel 5. The woman is wearing a short dress with a jacket. Mack is wearing slacks, a button-down shirt, a vest, and a bandana. In the background are trees, cars, a parking lot, a sidewalk, and rocks.
Date: 1971
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Photograph of Old Bass Home]

Description: Photograph of Old Bass Home in Denison, Texas. The two-story building is white with a balcony above the front door. The windows are tall and narrow and there are short shrubs along the front of the house.
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[Photograph of Home of Thomas V. Munson]

Description: Photograph of the home of Thomas V. Munson to Denison, Texas. The two-story house has narrow windows with shutters. There is a fence around the yard and a paved path leading to the entrance and around the house. There a sign out front that reads: Vinita 1887. Thomas Volney Munson historic home.
Date: 2011-12/2012-03
Creator: West, Carolyn Effie
Partner: Private Collection of Carolyn West

[Glenfawn Cemetery historical marker]

Description: Photograph of a historical marker at the Glenfawn Cemetery. It reads "Glenfawn Cemetery; Cemetery was begun after the death of Julien Sidney Devereux (1805-56), with the remains of his father, John W. Devereux (1769-1847), and an infant son reinterred soon after. Called Devereux and sand field, the plot served nearby Forest Hill community (1 mile N), site of academy founded by Devereux in 1805. Name was changed to Glenfawn in 1972 when post office opened with Charles Nunnally, postmaster. The settlement had several stores, two blacksmiths, school, church and masonic lodge building. The old Methodist - Baptist church was located east of cemetery. (1973)".
Date: November 24, 2018
Creator: Texas Society Sons of the American Revolution, Arlington Chapter 7
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
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