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[An Early View of Mesquite Street]

Description: This picture shows the D.M. Howard Block, on the lower end of Mesquite Street [2011], the intersection of Hubbard and SE 1st streets), facing west. The principal D.M. Howard building (farthest to the left in the photograph) survived to house various furniture establishments until 1975, when it was demolished. The three subsidiary buildings had been removed earlier. A legend on the base of the original photograph reads: "LOWER END OF MESQUITE STREET--Photo by McClure". Please note the absence of automobiles, the complete lack of paving, and the large traveling-bonnet worn by the lady in the foreground. The telegraph pole in the foreground appears to have been hand-hewn. The unpaved road supplies corroborating evidence that the photograph was taken before 1914. The identity of McClure, however, remains unknown. This picture appears in A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...." on page 122.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Mineral Wells Hardware

Description: The sign painted on the side of the store proclaims that this building is the Mineral Wells Hardware Company. Located at 212 SE 1st Avenue, it was owned by Mssrs. Smith & Frost. It was later bought by L.E. Seaman. In 1975, it became the location of Widlake Motor Supply. The picture appears on page 126 of A. F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells...."
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[Construction of the Malsby Dairy]

Description: Construction of the Malsby Dairy is shown here, going on apace. Steel girders are being put in place, presumably to support a future roof. It was located at 300 SE 1st Street. Construction began (it is conjectured) in the late 1940's. The building once housed a newspaper (in the 1960's) called "The Advance", and then the "Mineral Wells Index." The "Index" still [2007] occupies the building. Please note that only half of the men in the picture are shown wearing hard hats. Please note also the derrick mounted on the back of a truck. A hand-written legend on the photograph reads: "Malsby Creamery"
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Hubbard Street: About 1925

Description: A picture of Hubbard Street, looking northwards to Oak Street is illustrated here. In the distance, the Crazy Hotel is being built. The photograph dates after 1925. It appears on page 135 of A.F. Weaver's "TIME WAS in Mineral Wells..."
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[An Engraving of a Crowd of Men]

Description: We have here what appears to be an illustration taken from a larger page with printing on it. From its quality, it appears to be a steel engraving, made to look like an early 19th-century illustration. It portrays several men (no women are shown being present) gathered around what appears to be a well. An anonymous building, and two young trees, are directly behind them; and another wall in the distance bears a legend that vaguely announces groceries. The man on the extreme right-hand side is missing most of his left leg. Another man to his right is balancing a keg on his thigh. It is a puzzle what the men are doing, because the remains of the matter surrounding the picture appear to discuss the subject of printing.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The Daily Index

Description: Shown here is the front page of the Mineral Wells "Index", featuring a picture of Judge Alvin Lynch, astride a mule and holding a large bottle of the Mineral Wells water. The picture is not sufficiently in focus to read a reliable date to the newspaper, except perhaps to discern that the issue comes from "Volume VIII". We are accustomed to having a newspaper printed with the help of electricity. However, the "Index" of 1940 states that such was not always the case. "Employees of the Index", is said, "Can remember back in the old days when the electric service was rather questionable, especially at night--and it was the custom to put the press boy up on the feeder of the newspaper press, tie an electric cord around his neck,and let him go to sleep. When the power came on the bulb would get hot and wake him up--then he would round up the printers and they would get back to work." All this was in keeping with electricity that consisted of "[A] single drop cord in each room and on the end of it a 32 candle power light globe."
Date: 1902?-05-(06)?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

The Carlsbad of America

Description: Shown here is the battered title page of a pamphlet about Mineral Wells, calling it "The Carlsbad of America." It gives the property valuation (ending in 1905), and the population of the city (also ending in 1905). A colophon at the bottom of the pamphlet remarks "Texas An Empire---A nation within a Nation." The pamphlet reports itself as the work of the Index Printing Company.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Birch McClendon Food Store]

Description: The only information about this picture comes from a legend on the back of it: Mrs. Vernon Hill father & n of [sic] Chester Claywell Mr. Lord. grocery [illegible] Specialty Shop [written vertically] DW Griffith It is featured in "Time was in Mineral Wells" on page 128 as "Birch McClendon Food Store, located at 211 Southeast 1st Street." The pointed light-bulb (and the collar of the clerk) suggests that it was photographed at the turn of the twentieth century.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

"Where the Famous Crystals Are Made"

Description: This is a photograph of a building with a sign that says, "Famous Mineral Wells Crystal Plant." There is a hill, covered in trees, behind the building. Writing at the bottom of the image reads: "Where Famous Crystals Are Made." Ed Dismuke, a druggist from Waco, came to Mineral Wells for his health after his family physician told him he only had a "short time" to live. After miraculously regaining his health, which he credited to the mineral waters of his new hometown, he sold water by the drink at the Damron Hotel, later opening his own company, The Famous Water Company. He also opened The Famous Mineral Crystal Plant on the east side of Lake Pinto in partnership with local banker Cicero Smith. The two also organized The Mineral Wells Lakewood Park Scenic Railway with its two gasoline-powered "dinky cars" named "Esther" and "Susie" after Smith's daughters. This is a picture of the plant where Famous Crystals, labeled "Pronto Lax" were made. Dismuke had outlived the doctors who had told him he only had a short time to live when he died at the age of ninety-four.
Date: 1905?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Souvenir Views of Mineral Wells, Texas

Description: Shown here is a bottle-shaped souvenir of Mineral Wells. It consists of fourteen folios, showing various views of the attractions found in Mineral Wells. The clothing of the people photographed suggests a date of the early twentieth century.
Date: unknown
Creator: Yeager Drug Co.
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[Fishing at Lake Mineral Wells]

Description: Fishermen stand below a cataract of the spillway of Lake Mineral Wells. The photograph was taken in 1938. On the reverse of the picture is the and-written legend: Picture taken by A. F. Weaver. This picture is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells...." on page 112.
Date: 1938
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[Photograph of Lake Mineral Wells]

Description: Photograph of the Civic League Island at Lake Mineral Wells, four miles east of Mineral Wells, Texas, with a rustic bridge connecting the two small islands, picnic tables, and grilles. In the foreground, there are two small boats with canopies, carrying passengers on the water of the lake. A forested shoreline is visible in the background of the image.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[Penitentiary Hollow]

Description: Three ladies (bearing bouquets), a man and a boy perch among the angular boulders of Penitentiary Hollow on the east side of Lake Mineral Wells. Their identities are unknown. This picture is probably a souvenir photograph, taken at some time during the late 1910's or early 1920's. The area gets its name from the widespread belief that cattle thieves were thought to be accustomed to cache their booty here, in preparation to driving it on to market. Therefore, anybody detected in this place (who could no give a good account of himself--it was usually a "he") was likely to find lodging in the nearest penitentiary.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Paving Brick Plant

Description: Shown here is a photograph of the Paving Brick Plant. In the lower right-hand corner is the legend: Young Studio Mineral Wells, Tex." It was established in 1921; electrified in 1925-1926; the company was sold in 1927, re-named "Reliance Brick Company." It is featured in "Time Was in Mineral Wells on page 162. Electrification was accomplished when the Texas Power and Light Company furnished an abandoned 500 h.p. stream-power plant for the job. It was fed natural gas by means of the Upham Gas Company's line. In 1927, the plant was the largest of its kind west of the Mississippi River. It confined its production exclusively to vitrified shale material. The manager in 1927 has been identified as A. E. Eaton, who was also instrumental in locating the plant in Mineral Wells.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[A Photographic Miscellany of Mineral Wells]

Description: Shown here is a possible composite picture of the attractions about Mineral Wells. It features a panorama of Camp Wolters, dated 1941; A scenic drive, Mineral Wells; the hospital & headquarters Areas; Regimental Areas 4 & 5, Camp Wolters. Several small towns(e.g. Salesville, Graford, and Santo) are shown as existing--but nothing more.
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Crazy Water Well--1974]

Description: What is said to be the original Crazy Woman's Well is preserved under the sidewalk at the northwest corner of the Crazy Hotel. This is supposed to be the well the mentally-challenged (or the once-designated "Crazy woman") drank from that "Cured" her dementia. Stories are in conflict about how many women there were--and whether the water actually cured any of them of epilepsy. Subsequent analysis of the water refuted a rumor that there was any Lithium was in it. Cutter's "Guide to Mineral Wells" (first published in 1893, re-printed in 2007) suggests that the first well was "[N]ear the center of one of the business blocks of the city, back of the hardware store of L. B . Kidwell. It is now out of use and, we learned, to be filled up." Although not used for years, this well probably only requires a pump to resume production. Printed on the back of this picture is "The Crazy Well as today", and stamped "Mar. 21, 1974."
Date: March 24, 1974
Creator: Weaver, A. F.
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[The Second Crazy Water Well Drinking Pavilion]

Description: The small building seen at the right of this picture was the First Crazy Well Drinking Pavilion. The large structure in the center of the picture is an early view of the second Pavilion, which was built in 1900. This picture was taken before its first two floors were enclosed. The Carlsbad pavilion, which was built around 1895 (across NW 1st Avenue and west of the Crazy) also appears in several pictures of the area around this time. Its absence in this photograph is probably the result of a combination of perspective, angle of picture, and depth-of-view of the camera. The Second Pavilion (shown in this photograph) was replaced in 1909 by the Crazy Flats, which burned in the fire of 1925. The current Crazy Hotel opened in 1927, and occupies the entire city block. It is now [2003] a retirement home.
Date: 1900?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

Oak Street, Looking South

Description: This picture shows the 100 block of what is now N. Oak Avenue, looking south. The "Palace Saloon" sign is still visible in 2008. The Palo Pinto County Courthouse Annex currently [2010] occupies the building that once housed Poston's Dry Goods (just down the street from the Palace Saloon). Please note the absence of trolley tracks--or the festoon of wires required to keep its power-line in place. The unpaved street dates the photograph prior to 1914, and probably prior to the previous picture.
Date: 1914?
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library

[Dr. J.H. McCracken Home, 3 of 3: Different View]

Description: The Dr. J.H. McCracken home, built in 1904 at 516 West Hubbard, and restored by Gil Hull. Joseph Hill McCracken was born on a farm near Springtown, Texas, October 1, 1867. He graduated from the University of Tennessee Medical School in 1891, and returned to Texas. He married Marie Sue Wilson, the daughter of Oliver Loving's youngest daughter, Margaret on October 15, 1895. He was elected President of the Texas Medical Association in 1911 and practiced medicine in Mineral Wells for over fifty years. He frequently laughed about having "delivered babies of babies of babies." Dr. McCracken died in March of 1954, and his wife died in November of 1955. Both are buried in Mineral Wells' Woodland Park Cemetery. Professor John N. McCracken, who established the Mineral Wells College directly across the street west of the McCracken home, is believed to be Dr. McCracken's father. [For details of the Mineral Wells College, please see the picture "Mineral Wells School, Texas"]
Date: unknown
Partner: Boyce Ditto Public Library